The Bible in Victorian Glasgow

The Bible in Victorian Glasgow

The nineteenth century saw a vigorous expansion of Bible printing and publishing for a buoyant home and overseas market fuelled by evangelical revival and missionary zeal. Much of this work took place in Glasgow; Blackie & Son (1809), the Glasgow Bible Society (1812), William Collins and Sons (1819) and R.L. Allan & Sons (1863) all produced bibles for these expanding markets.

From 1881 onwards a series of new translations – The English Revised Version, the American Standard Version, and the Revised Standard Version – were published. These revisions, driven by new scholarship and new discoveries of early manuscript material, were intended to take into account new understandings of Hebrew and Greek texts and contemporary understanding of English, while staying fairly close to the Tyndale-King James Bible tradition.

The printing and publishing of the King James Bible in Scotland is regulated by The Bible Board of Scotland, established by Queen Victoria in 1839 to prevent unlicensed editions circulating. The Queen, as sovereign, retains the perpetual copyright to the Authorized Version under Letters Patent for all the UK, including Scotland.

Collins, R.L Allan and the Scottish Bible Society continue to print and publish the Bible in Scotland in different versions and modern translations, many of which trace their origins to the 1611 first edition of the King James Bible.

 

The imperial family Bible containing the Old & New Testaments according to the most approved copies of the Authorized Version, with many thousand critical, explanatory and practical notes. Glasgow, Edinburgh & London, 1847.
The imperial family Bible ... Glasgow, Edinburgh &; London, 1847.
The Holy Bible. Glasgow, 1896 and 1901.
The Holy Bible. Glasgow, 1896 and 1901.
The practical and devotional family Bible. Glasgow, 1869.
The practical and devotional family Bible. Glasgow, 1869.

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