Computing Technologies for Healthcare

The School of Computing Science undertakes research across a broad spectrum of healthcare technologies. These range from building models to help understand the chemistry of life and disease (computational biology and -omics technologies), to the analysis and detection of mental and psychiatric issues (attachment in children, dementia, autism, depression, etc.), passing through the development of computing technologies supporting the activity of doctors and medical personnel (kidney donors matching and analysis of medical documents) and of prosthetic technologies (Brain Computer Interfaces).

Theme Lead: Dr Simon Rogers

Kidney exchange - cycles

Track record - staff

The theme brings together researchers from across the School who are involved in projects relevant to healthcare, from the chemistry of life (computational biology and polyomics), to the analysis and detection of mental and psychiatric issues (attachment in children, dementia, autism, depression, etc.), passing through the development of computing technologies supporting the activity of doctors and medical personnel (kidney donors matching and analysis of medical documents) and of prosthetic technologies (Brain Computer Interfaces). Academic staff active in this area include: Professor Stephen Brewster, Dr Jeff Dalton, Dr Mary Ellen Foster, Dr David Manlove, Professor Rod Murray-Smith, Professor Iadh Ounis, Dr Craig Macdonald, Dr Paul Siebert, Professor Alessandro Vinciarelli, Dr John Williamson, Dr Bjørn Jensen, Dr Ke Yuan, and Dr Jeff Dalton. Our staff members include an ex member of the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute (Yuan), and an ex member of Google Health (Dalton).

Examples of the activities in this area include:

GIST (Brewster, Vinciarelli, Foster)

  • The EPSRC funded School Attachment Monitor project (in collaboration with the Adverse Childhood Experiences Centre, Brewster and Vinciarelli
  • The EPSRC funded Socially Competent Robotics project (in collaboration with the Scottish Autism Centre), in which the goal is to teach social skills to autistic adults via robots (Vinciarelli and Foster)
  • Participation in the H2020 funded International Training Network “Technology Enabled Mental Health for Young People” (http://www.team-itn.eu), aimed at preventing and treating mental health difficulties in young people (Brewster).

FATA (Manlove)

  • Development of algorithms for matching patients and donors in kidney transplants (funded by various EPSRC and NHS grants) (Manlove).

IDA (Murray-Smith, Ounis, Macdonald, Rogers, Jensen, Yuan, Siebert, Dalton)

  • Development of 3d imaging techniques used in medical problems for example the rendering of CT scans (Siebert; Collaboration with Dimensional Imaging)
  • Use of information retrieval for searching electronic health records and medical literature (Ounis and Macdonald; in collaboration with tripdatabase.com and Trip.com)
  • The application of machine learning to problems in computational metabolomics (Rogers; also affiliate member of Glasgow Polyomics), computational biology applied to cancer treatments (Yuan) and Cancer imaging (Jensen)
  • Involvement in an EU project on the development of Brain Computer Interfaces for people affected by spinal cord injuries http://www.moregrasp.eu (Murray-Smith and Williamson)

The researchers and activities above are part of a network of collaboration with other researchers within the University that include various institutes in MVLS, the College of Science and Engineering, and we are currently involved in the development of a new MSc in Medical Technology.


Projects (active in the last 6 years)