Postgraduate taught 

English Literature MLitt

Pathways

Pathways

English Literature

Build your own English Literature postgraduate degree, drawing on the rich range of optional courses available from English Literature, the School of Critical Studies, and elsewhere in the College of Arts or even beyond.

Core courses:

  • English Literature Research Training 
  • English Literature Dissertation

Optional courses:

  • Of the five further 20 credit courses you take, two must be from any of those offered within the English Literature MLitt programme.
  • The remaining three 20 credit courses may be either from English Literature or, with the convenor’s permission, from elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond, e.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, the School of Education, etc.

English Literature courses may include:

  • The American Counterculture, 1945-75
  • American Fiction of the 1930s
  • Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline)
  • Decadence and The Modern
  • Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900
  • Explaining Change: Science and Literary Culture 1830-1880
  • F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton and Dialogues of American Literary Modernism
  • Fantasy c. 1780 to 1950
  • Fantasy 1950 to the present
  • Fictions of Adultery
  • From Medieval to Early Modern
  • Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature
  • The Mind of the Contemporary American Novel
  • The Modern Everyday
  • Modernist Sexualities
  • Modernities 1: Literature, Culture and Theory 1880-1945
  • Modernities 2: Literature, Culture and Theory 1945 to the present
  • Neo-Victorianism
  • The Novel Now
  • Proust in Theory
  • Victorian 1: Writing the Times
  • Victorian 2: Readers, Writers, Publishers
  • Virginia Woolf Writes Modernity
  • Writing Empire

English Literature: Fantasy

This programme is designed to give you an overview of fantasy literature in English from the era of revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century to the present. As well as charting the history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fiction where this had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to a range of contemporary critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic.

Visiting speakers will be invited, which will give you the opportunity to meet contemporary writers, critics and publishers. There is a Fantasy Film Club and you will also be encouraged to participate reflectively in fantasy-related conventions, conferences and festivals, and to join us on field trips and other events. The Masters in Fantasy is a programme run by enthusiasts for enthusiasts, and we hope this will show.

Core courses:

  • Fantasy 1: c. 1780-1950
  • Fantasy 2: 1950 to the present
  • English Literature Research Training

Optional courses:

You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from:

  • the options listed under the General English Literature pathway 
  • elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more. 

You can find out more about the courses you can take as part of the Fantasy pathway on the Fantasy MLitt page.

English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture

The MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture offers students the opportunity to study one of the most vibrant and intellectually challenging periods of literary history. This is an interdisciplinary programme offering a mixture of compulsory and option courses; students may choose options across the range of postgraduate taught courses on offer across the University.

You will work with a team of internationally renowned experts with an unparalleled range of medieval and early modern interests, and develop your research skills in manuscripts and print culture by working with the rich manuscript and printed collections held at Glasgow University, the Hunterian, and the Kelvin Hall.  You will also have the option to study a language (i.e. Old English or Latin)

Core courses:

  • From Medieval to Early Modern
  • Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature
  • English Literature Research Training

Optional courses:

You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be:

  • Gender and Religion in Medieval English Literature
  • Alternative Continuities: Scottish Literature, 1425-1625
  • Early Modern Mythmaking
  • Seventeenth-Century Women Writers
  • Humour, Opposition, and Literature in Early Modern England

They can also be from:

  • The options listed under the General English Literature pathway
  • elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more. 

English Literature: Modernities

This programme provides the opportunity for advanced study of literary modernism and the avant-garde, and postmodern and contemporary developments in culture and theory. You will investigate the key texts and concepts which shape our understanding of literature and culture across a period of radical change, through an examination of the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of different modern movements; and through an examination of issues in modern writing, particularly those relating to modernity (such as mass culture, revolution, war and empire) and post-modernity (such as simulation, spectacle, performativity and trauma). Throughout, you will study texts in relation to developments in other cultural practices, such as film, theatre and the visual arts.

Core courses:

  • Modernities 1: 1890-1945
  • Modernities 2: 1945 to the present
  • English Literature Research Training

Optional courses:

You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from:

  • the options listed under the General English Literature pathway 
  • elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more. 

You can find out more about the courses you can take as part of the Modernities pathway on the Modernities: Literature, Theory & Culture MLitt page.

English Literature: Victorian Literature

This programme is designed to give you a wide-ranging knowledge of Victorian literature and literary history, introducing you to the period or building on any previous experience of it you may have. You will study a great variety of Victorian writers, genres and forms, and will hone your skills in close reading, historical contextualisation, and use of critical and theoretical sources.  You will also have the opportunity to explore your particular interests in detail, working with staff who are specialists in many aspects of Victorian literature and culture.

Glasgow has outstanding resources for the study of Victorian literature including our Special Collections and library. Glasgow is in many ways a Victorian city and you will be working amid some of the most important and beautiful Victorian architecture and landscapes in the UK.  The programme is designed to help you develop research, writing and professional skills which will be transferable to doctoral study or employment. Previous graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs at Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge, and other universities, and to careers in teaching, journalism, and consultancy, among other areas.

Core courses:

  • Victorian 1: Writing the Times
  • Victorian 2: Readers, Writers, Publishers

Optional courses:

You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from:

  • the options listed under the General English Literature pathway 
  • elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more. 

You can find out more about the courses you can take as part of the Victorian Literature pathway on the Victorian Literature MLitt page.