Vacancies

Academic postions

Currently no vacancies available 

Postdoctoral postions

Rankin-Sneddon Research Fellow

The University of Glasgow, established in 1451, is a member of the UK's Russell Group of leading universities. The University is committed to enhancing its position as one of the world's great broad-based research-intensive universities. In REF 2014, the School was ranked 8th in the UK for research intensity in the mathematical sciences.

The School of Mathematics and Statistics invites applications for a 3-year Rankin-Sneddon Research Fellowship in the School of Mathematics and Statistics. More than one appointment may be made. The candidates will undertake independent research in a field of mathematics (pure or applied) that complements or reinforces the existing research strengths within the School.

While primarily a research position, this fellowship will carry a light teaching load, which will normally mean lecturing one 20-credit course, or two 10-credit courses, with associated tutorials, each academic year. This will typically translate into approximately 4 contact hours per week in each of two 11-week semesters per year, the distribution of which may be flexible. Research fellows will also have the opportunity to supervise Honours and/or Masters Projects in their area of interest.

Interviews: week commencing 16th March 2020

Information about the School and all its research groups is available from the School website at www.gla.ac.uk/schools/mathematicsstatistics/

Informal enquiries may be directed to Deputy Head of Mathematics, Prof Michael Wemyss, michael.wemyss@glasgow.ac.uk

For full details and application, visit https://my.corehr.com/pls/uogrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=032681

Salary will be on the University's Research and Teaching Grade, level 7, £35,845 - £40,322 per annum.

Funding is available for up to three years in the first instance

Professional, Administrative and Support opportunities

Currently no vacancies available

Funded Ph.D opportunities

Iapetus PhD studentships

* Glasgow: (Teed, Simitev)

The force balance in Earth's core and its implication for the geodynamo http://www.iapetus.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/IAP-17-23-Teed-Glasgow.pdf

* Newcastle: (Guervilly, Simitev, Teed)

Formation and Dynamics of a Stably Stratified Layer below the Core-Mantle Boundary http://www.iapetus.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/IAP-17-98-Guervilly-Newcastle.pdf

The Generation of the Earthʼs Magnetic Field: The Strong-Field Regime http://www.iapetus.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/IAP-17-99-Guervilly-Newcastle.pdf

Also see http://www.iapetus.ac.uk/studentships.

 

Theoretical modelling of cell response to external cues (PhD)

Supervisors: Peter Stewart
Relevant research groups: Continuum Mechanics - Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics, Continuum Mechanics - Modelling and Analysis of Material Systems, Mathematical Biology

Cells and tissues respond to mechanotransductive and biochemical cues. These external cues interact with protein signaling pathways within the cell and can trigger changes in size, structure, binding and differentiation. This project will use theoretical modelling to examine the response of an array of cells to various external mechanical and biochemical cues, considering how these cues can be tailored to optimize a particular outcome. The model will couple the mechanical components of the cell (nucleus, cytoskeleton,…) to internal protein expression pathways (Myosin II, MLCK,…) and the properties of the external stimuli. The model will take the form of coupled differential equations which will be solved using both analytical and numerical methods.

This model will be validated against experimental data in two main ways, including examining the response of the array to small amplitude mechanical vibration (‘nanokicking’) to predict its influence on the behavior of the array over long timescales. The model will also be used to understand growth factor delivery using PODS® technology developed by Cell Guidance Systems to predict the optimal spatial arrangement of PODS® relative to the array and the resulting temporal and spatial profiles of both the growth factor and the cell growth and proliferation.

This project is part of the LifETIME Centre for Doctoral Training

https://lifetime-cdt.org/projects-2/

and involves collaboration with Prof Matt Dalby (Institute of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology) and industrial partner Cell Guidance Systems. Applicants must apply to the CDT (details on the website) to be considered for this project.

 

Electrophysiological modelling of hearts with diseases (PhD)

Supervisors: Radostin Simitev, Hao Gao
Relevant research groups: Continuum Mechanics - Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics, Continuum Mechanics - Modelling and Analysis of Material Systems, Mathematical Biology

SofTMechMP is a new International Centre to Centre Collaboration between the SofTMech Centre for Multiscale Soft Tissue Mechanics (www.softmech.org) and  two world-leading research centres, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA and Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) in Italy, funded by the EPSRC. Its exciting programme of research will address important new mathematical challenges driven by clinical needs, such as tissue damage and healing, by developing multiscale soft tissue models that are reproducible and testable against experiments.

Heart disease has a strong negative impact on society. In the United Kingdom alone, there are about 1.5 million people living with the burden of a heart attack. In developing countries, too, heart disease is becoming an increasing problem. Unfortunately, the exact mechanisms by which heart failure occurs are poorly understood. On a more optimistic note, a revolution is underway in healthcare and medicine - numerical simulations are increasingly being used to help diagnose and treat heart disease and devise patient-specific therapies. This approach depends on three key enablers acting in accord. First, mathematical models describing the biophysical changes of biological tissue in disease must be formulated for any predictive computation to be possible at all. Second, statistical techniques for uncertainty quantification and parameter inference must be developed to link these models to patient-specific clinical measurements. Third, efficient numerical algorithms and codes need to be designed to ensure that the models can be simulated in real time so they can be used in the clinic for prediction and prevention.

The goals of this project include designing more efficient algorithms for numerical simulation of the electrical behaviour of hearts with diseases on cell, tissue and on whole-organ levels. The most accurate tools we have, at present, are so called monolithic models where the differential equations describing constituent processes are assembled in a single large system and simultaneously solved, While accurate, the monolithic approaches are  expensive as a huge disparity in spatial and temporal scales between relatively slow mechanical and much faster electrical processes exists and must be resolved. However, not all electrical behaviour is fast so the project will exploit advances in cardiac asymptotics to develop a reduced kinematic description of propagating electrical signals. These reduced models will be fully coupled to the original partial-differential equations for spatio-temporal evolution of the slow nonlinear dynamic fields. This will allow significantly larger spatial and time steps to be used in monolithic numerical schemes and pave the way for clinical applications, particularly coronary perfusion post infarction. The models thus developed will be applied to specific problems of interest, including

(1) coupling among myocyte-fibroblast-collagen scar;

(2) shape analysis of scar tissue and their effects on electric signal propagation;

(3) personalized 3D heart models using human data.

 The project will require and will develop knowledge of mathematical modelling, asymptotic and numerical methods for PDEs and software development and some basic knowledge of physiology.  Upon completion you will be a mature researcher with broad interdisciplinary education. You will not only be prepared for an independent scientific career, but will be much sought after by both academia and industry for the rare combination of mathematical and numerical skills. 

 

Arterial dissection (PhD)

Supervisors: Nicholas A Hill, Steven Roper, Xiaoyu Luo
Relevant research groups: Mathematical Biology, Continuum Mechanics - Modelling and Analysis of Material Systems, Continuum Mechanics - Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics

Location:

School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK,

Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano.Supervisors:

Prof Nicholas HIll   (lead, UofG, Mathematics),

Dr Steven Roper   (UofG, Mathematics),

Prof Xiaoyu Luo   (UofG, Mathematics),

Prof Anna Pandolfi   (Structural Mechanics, Politecnico di Milano)

 

 

Scholarship details:

 

Eligibility: A three-and-a-half year, fully-funded PhD scholarship open to UK/EU applicants

 

 

Project Description:

 

 

SofTMechMP is a new International Centre to Centre Collaboration between the SofTMech Centre for Multiscale Soft Tissue Mechanics (www.softmech.org) and  two world-leading research centres, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA and Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) in Italy, funded by the EPSRC. Its exciting programme of research will address important new mathematical challenges driven by clinical needs, such as tissue damage and healing, by developing multiscale soft tissue models that are reproducible and testable against experiments.

This PhD project will focus on the application of our new theories of tissue damage to arterial dissection, using mathematical and computational modelling. Arterial dissection is a tear along the length of an artery that fills with high pressure blood and often re-enters the lumen. In the case of the aorta, this is life-threatening, as the dissection often propagates upstream and compromises the aortic valve. The objectives of the project are to predict the propagation and arrest of the dissection in patient-specific geometries, and to help to assess the benefits and risks of treatments including the placement of stents.

 

The student will develop expertise in multiscale hyperelastic continuum models, and in the numerical methods to solve the governing equations in physiological geometries. The student will have the opportunity to visit and work with our collaborators at MIT and POLIMI, and with our clinical and industrial partners, and will be part of a large dynamic group of researchers at the University of Glasgow.

 

Upon completion you will be a mature researcher with broad interdisciplinary education. You will not only be prepared for an independent scientific career, but will be much sought after by both academia and industry for the rare combination of mathematical and numerical skills. 

 

Application will be through the University of Glasgow Postgraduate Admissions:

 

 

https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/

For further information please contact:

Professor Nicholas A Hill FIMA

Executive Director - SofTMech

Senate Assessor on Court

School of Mathematics & Statistics

Tel: 0141 330 4258

Nicholas.Hill@glasgow.ac.uk

 

 

Optimisation of stent devices to treat dissected aorta (PhD)

Supervisors: Nicholas A Hill
Relevant research groups: Mathematical Biology, Continuum Mechanics - Modelling and Analysis of Material Systems, Continuum Mechanics - Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics

Location:

 

School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK,

 

Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano,

 

Terumo Aortic, Newmains Ave, Inchinnan, Glasgow

 

Supervisors:

Prof Nicholas Hill (lead, UofG, Mathematics),

Dr Robbie Brodie (Terumo Aortic),

Dr Sean McGinty (UofG, Biomedical Engineering),

Prof Francesco Migliavacca,   (Industrial Bioengineering, Politecnico di Milano)

 

 

Scholarship details:

Eligibility: A three-and-a-half year, fully-funded PhD scholarship open to UK/EU applicants

Project Description: 

SofTMechMP is a new International Centre to Centre Collaboration between the SofTMech Centre for Multiscale Soft Tissue Mechanics (www.softmech.org) and  two world-leading research centres, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the USA and Politecnico di Milano (POLIMI) in Italy, funded by the EPSRC. Its exciting programme of research will address important new mathematical challenges driven by clinical needs, such as tissue damage and healing, by developing multiscale soft tissue models that are reproducible and testable against experiments.

This PhD project will focus on the application of our new theories of tissue damage and growth and remodelling to the design of stents by Terumo Aortic to treat aortic dissection, using mathematical and computational modelling. An aortic dissection is a tear along the length of vessel that fills with high pressure blood and often re-enters the lumen. This is life-threatening, as the dissection often propagates upstream and compromises the aortic valve. The objectives of the project are to help to develop and optimise the next generation of stents by predicting their performance in patient-specific geometries, and to minimise the medium- to long-term risks due to remodelling of the arterial wall.

The student will develop expertise in multiscale hyperelastic continuum models, and in advanced numerical methods to solve the governing equations in physiological geometries. The student will have the opportunity to visit and work with our collaborators at MIT and POLIMI, and with our clinical partners, and will be part of a large dynamic group of researchers at the University of Glasgow and Terumo Aortic, a world-leading company in the design and manufacture of medical devices.

Upon completion you will be a mature researcher with broad interdisciplinary education. You will not only be prepared for an independent scientific career, but will be much sought after by both academia and industry for the rare combination of mathematical and numerical skills. 

 

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Application will be through the University of Glasgow Postgraduate Admissions:

 

https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/

 

For further information please contact:

 

Professor Nicholas A Hill FIMA

Executive Director - SofTMech

Senate Assessor on Court

School of Mathematics & Statistics

Tel: 0141 330 4258

Nicholas.Hill@glasgow.ac.uk

 

 

Mathematical modelling of the heart and the circulation (PhD)

Supervisors: Nicholas A Hill, Xiaoyu Luo
Relevant research groups: Mathematical Biology, Continuum Mechanics - Modelling and Analysis of Material Systems, Continuum Mechanics - Fluid Dynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics

 

Location:

 

School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK,

 

Supervisors:  Xiaoyu Luo and Nick Hill

 

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disability and death in the UK and worldwide. The British Heart Foundation (BHF) estimates it has a £19B annual economic impact.Structural impairment such as mitral regurgitation and myocardial infarction are heart diseases that, even when treated in time, can lead to diastolic heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, for which there is no recommended treatment options.   Mathematical modelling of the heart can advance our understanding of heart function, and promises to support diagnosis and develop new treatments.

This PhD project will focus on developing mathematical descriptions of the whole heart and its interactions with the circulation, using a combination of one-dimensional and lumped parameter models.  State-of-the-art structured-tree models will be used for systemic, pulmonary and coronary circulations.  The objectives of the project are to identify how the heart functions under different pathological diseases and what treatment options may be effective.  The student will develop expertise in fluid and solid mechanics modelling, as well as insights into mathematically-guided clinical translation.   The project will be performed in the research environment of SofTMech (www.softmech.org) where extensive collaborations with clinicians and international research groups are forged.  The student will have the opportunity to visit and work with our collaborators, including our clinical and industrial partners, and will be part of a large dynamic group of researchers at the University of Glasgow. 

Upon completion you will be a mature researcher with broad interdisciplinary education. You will not only be prepared for an independent scientific career, but will be much sought after by both academia and industry for the rare combination of mathematical and numerical skills.   

 

Application will be through the University of Glasgow Postgraduate Admissions: 

 

https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/

 

 

 

For further information please contact:

 

 

 

Professor Nicholas A Hill FIMA

 

Executive Director - SofTMech

 

Senate Assessor on Court

 

School of Mathematics & Statistics

 

Tel: 0141 330 4258

 

Nicholas.Hill@glasgow.ac.uk