Postgraduate research opportunities 

Information Studies

Information Studies has a vibrant research culture with a growing number of doctoral and masters students, exploring a range of topics in the fields of information studies, museology, digital culture and digital humanities.

Overview

Information Studies has a vibrant research culture that investigates a range of topics in the fields of information studies and digital culture, and digital humanities. Rapid technological change, massive volumes of digital information of increasing complexity, that is both global and mobile pose significant challenges to us individually and collectively. Fundamental concepts such as identity, memory, authenticity, trust, transparency, accountability, representation, engagement, preservation of cultural heritage and access are just some of the issues that the transition to the digital age brings into focus. These concerns demand a fresh theoretical approach, a deeper understanding of the nature of information and innovative solutions that connect theory with practice, people with information and technology with humanity. 

Information Studies research focuses on five main areas:

Theoretical approaches to information

Issues of post-modernism, relativism, cognition and consciousness, with a particular emphasis on machine consciousness, enkinaesthesia, and information processing in both computational and post-computational frameworks.

Staff: Susan Stuart

Management, Curation and Evaluation of Digital Assets

Information Studies has major research strengths in digital preservation, curation and data management with a particular emphasis on collaborative, translational research in national and international projects. Our research considers the complex questions that surround our ICT-enabled audit and compliance cultures, and particularly the relationship with such facilities as automation, the semantic web, social networking and mobile devices.

Staff: Joy Davidson, Yunhyong Kim, Sarah Jones, Ann Gow, Ian G Anderson

Archive, Records and (Personal) Information Management

Information Studies delivers strong research and teaching in archive, records and (personal) information management (RIM) research, through projects including the European Electronic Resource Preservation and Access Network (ERPANET) and the NTCIR Lifelogging evaluation task. Information Studies has pioneered a risk-based approach to research and learning in this area that distances us from the existing literature, and crucially places ARIM at a strategic level within organisations.

Staff: Adele Redhead, Alistair Tough, Ian G Anderson, Lorna Hughes, Frank Hopfgartner

Digital Heritage, Digital Museology & Digital Humanities

Information Studies staff have been engaged in a number of innovative projects to create digital access to cultural heritage assets, conduct research on all aspects of the construction and use of knowledge in a digital age. Information Studies research has a particular focus on the design and presentation of interactive and participatory online resources, and the use of digital collections for research, teaching, and public engagement.

Staff: Ann Gow, Ian G Anderson, Matthew Barr, Maria Economou, Lorna Hughes, Frank Hopfgartner

Entertainment and information access systems

Information Studies staff focus on multidisciplinary aspects of information access and entertainment systems. This includes research on entertainment systems’ (e.g., video games, serious games, or gamified information systems) place in academia and teaching. Moreover, it includes research on personalised information systems (e.g., recommender systems, information retrieval systems, multimedia tools and applications).  

Staff: Frank Hopfgartner, Matthew Barr

Information Studies places great emphasis on the relationship of theory and practice in the information society drawing on a range of disciplinary perspectives and experience from different parts of the globe. Research students are expected to join the departmental research seminars and contribute to discussion and publications. Members of the department are delighted to discuss research proposals and ideas with prospective students on the above five areas. Topics of particular interest within these areas include:

  • Digital media in cultural heritage (ranging from behind the scenes collection information systems to social media and mobile apps for interpretation)
  • Visitor studies and evaluation of information use
  • Citizen science and crowdsourcing
  • Digital manuscripts and advanced imaging
  • Interactive information access systems (incorporating Information retrieval, artificial intelligence and recommender systems)
  • Game studies    
  • Personal Informatics
  • Multimedia Tools and Applications (ranging from video analysis to lifelogging)
  • Record keeping, archives, and accountability
  • Gamification in heritage settings and beyond
  • Digital collections: use, value and impact
  • The transformation of archival practice

 

Study options

PhD

Duration: 3 years full-time / 5 years part-time

A Doctor of Philosophy may be awarded to a student whose thesis is an original work making a significant contribution to knowledge in, or understanding of, a field of study and normally containing material worthy of publication.

Thesis Length:70,000-100,000 words, including references, bibliography and appendices (other than documentary appendices).

If undertaking a practice-based doctorate the thesis will consist of a shorter word length, to be negotiated with your supervisor, but not normally under 40,000 words, in addition to a substantive piece, or pieces, of practice.

MLitt (Research)

Duration: 2 years full-time / 3 years part-time

Our Degree of Master of Letters (Research) requires you to undertake a postgraduate course of special study and research that represents a distinct contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 40,000-70,000 words (including references, bibliography and appendices)

MPhil (Research)

Duration: 1 year full-time / 2years part-time

A Master of Philosophy (Research)requires you to undertake a postgraduate course of special study and research that represents a distinct contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 30,000-40,000 words (including references and bibliography)

MRes (Master of Research)

Duration: 1 year full-time / 2 years part-time

Our MRes includes both taught and research elements.  You will be required to undertake 60 to 90 credits worth of taught courses as well as independent study which represents some contribution to knowledge.

Thesis length: 18,000-30,000 words (including references, bibliography and appendices)

Supervisors

All our postgraduate research students are allocated a supervisor who acts as the main source of academic support and research mentoring.

You may want to identify a potential supervisor and contact them to discuss your research proposal before you apply.

Entry requirements

Our regular standard of admission is at least an Upper Second Class Honours degree (2:1), although candidates will usually also have completed or be undertaking a Masters qualification.

Research proposal

Candidates are required to provide a single page outline of the research subject proposed (approximately 1000 words). This need not be a final thesis proposal but should include:

  • a straightforward, descriptive, and informative title
  • the question that your research will address
  • an account of why this question is important and worth investigating
  • an assessment of how your own research will engage with recent study in the subject
  • a brief account of the methodology and approach you will take
  • a discussion of the primary sources that your research will draw upon, including printed books, manuscripts, archives, libraries, or museums
  • an indicative bibliography of secondary sources that you have already consulted and/or are planning to consult

Your application, including your references and research proposal, will be passed to members of staff whose expertise and research interests most closely match the area of your proposed study.

English Language requirements for applicants whose first language is not English.

Fees and funding

Fees

2016/17

  • £4,121 UK/EU
  • £15,250 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £440
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £890
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £140
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £250
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

2017/18

  • £4,195 UK/EU*
  • £16,000 outside EU

Prices are based on the annual fee for full-time study. Fees for part-time study are half the full-time fee.

* We expect that tuition fees for EU students entering in 2017 will continue to be set at the same level as that for UK students.  However, future funding arrangements for EU students will be determined as part of the UK’s discussions on its future relationship.  If you are thinking of applying for 2017 entry, we would encourage you to do so in the usual way. For further information, please see the Research Councils UK statement on international collaboration and Universities UK Brexit FAQs for universities and students.

Additional fees for all students:

  • Submission by a research student £460
  • Submission for a higher degree by published work £1,000
  • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed £200
  • Submission by staff in receipt of staff scholarship £680
  • Research students registered as non-supervised Thesis Pending students (50% refund will be granted if the student completes thesis within the first six months of the period) £260
  • General Council fee £50
  • Depending on the nature of the research project, some students will be expected to pay a bench fee to cover additional costs. The exact amount will be provided in the offer letter.

Alumni discount

A 10% discount is available to University of Glasgow alumni. This includes graduates and those who have completed a Junior Year Abroad, Exchange programme or International Summer School at the University of Glasgow. The discount is applied at registration for students who are not in receipt of another discount or scholarship funded by the University. No additional application is required.

Funding

AHRC Doctoral Training Programme Scotland 2018/19

Funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) to support postgraduate studentships and training in the Arts and Humanities in Scotland.

College of Arts PhD scholarship competition 2018/19

We offer a number of scholarships for students undertaking a doctoral programme in the College of Arts Graduate School. These scholarships will include around four hours per week of internship duties.

Support

Resources

Teaching and research in the Arts and Humanities is supported by the outstanding resources of our University Library with its special collections and our on-campus Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Our close links and partnerships with Glasgow Life, and the city’s many museums, art galleries, performing arts and music venues, international festivals and creative industry organisations make the University of Glasgow the ideal place for postgraduate study of the arts.

Graduate School

Our College of Arts Graduate School creates a productive and interdisciplinary collegiate environment for all of our research students. We offer a range of services, courses and skills development opportunities for research students.

The College of Arts is home to a vibrant and diverse community of students enrolled on taught masters and research programmes within a stimulating intellectual and cultural environment. Across every school and subject area the college is home to world-leading and agenda-setting research.

Find out more about what is happening in the community by following us: 

You will also be part of the wider Scottish Graduate School for Arts and Humanities, the world's first national graduate school in the Arts & Humanities. Membership includes 16 Scottish universities, four art schools & the national conservatoire, with support from the arts, culture, creative & heritage sectors. 

How to apply