Opportunities to contribute to MBChB Student Education

Opportunities to contribute to MBChB Student Education

The Undergraduate Medical School is looking to recruit enthusiastic educators to the MBChB curriculum.

The Undergraduate Medical School is greatly appreciative of the contributions made by those who assist with the teaching and assessment of our students.

This page outlines a number of excellent opportunities to get involved with MBChB Student Education.

Case Based Learning

Case Based Learning Opportunities

The Medical School recruits clinicians from FY2 onwards to contribute to Case Based Learning (CBL).


When and where is CBL undertaken?

CBL Tutorials take place in Phase 3 (the first 15 weeks of Year 3) at the following venues:

  • The New Lister Building at Glasgow Royal Infirmary
  • The Teaching and Learning Centre at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital
  • The Clinical Skills Suite within the Wolfson Medical School Building

What is CBL?

Case Based Learning (CBL) is a form of small group learning, which incorporates:

  • Group discussion of case scenarios presenting a problem.
  • Working and actively learning in groups.
  • Integration of prior and newly acquired knowledge.
  • Development and improvement of problem solving skills and critical thinking.
  • Use of self-study to consolidate learning that occurred in groups.

The advantage of this process is its ability to model the process of accessing information and solving medical problems which are the core activities of most physicians.

Role of a CBL Tutor

  • Prepare for each meeting by reading the materials compiled by the Week Leads.
  • Attend each session with your designated CBL group at the agreed time.
  • Complete the student attendance form for each meeting.
  • Highlight to the Medical School any students about whom you have academic or other concerns.
  • Work with the student group as a clinical teacher.
  • Facilitate, teach and guide students to reach an understanding of the material addressed.
  • At the end of CBL ensure the group reviews the learning objectives and make sure they have achieved them.
  • Provide formative feedback at the end of the session.

Benefits for a CBL Tutor

  • It is an enjoyable experience.
  • Tutors will receive a certificate confirming their contribution to undergraduate teaching.
  • Tutors who sign up to take a CBL group on four or more dates during the 15-week period will be given the opportunity to obtain individualised feedback. 
  • Certificates and feedback can be uploaded to e-Portfolio.
  • Provides excellent revision for post-graduate exams.
  • Specialty-specific training can be credited to specialty-based tutorials.
  • Teaching can be linked to specialties of interest that would help show 'commitment to specialty' at Core Medical Trainee interview.

Structure of CBL

CBL is led by a clinical tutor and takes place in small groups of approximately 10 students. 

The focus of CBL is on a clinical case history, the format of which is identical to that used in clinical practice, and the investigations appropriate to that case.

Each topic has a Week Lead, who is responsible for preparing the CBL materials, all materials will be emailed out to tutors one week in advance of their CBL Session.

Group Processes which occur during CBL

The following group processes occur during CBL:

  • Students work together as a group.
  • The group attempts to solve problems using critical thinking.
  • The discussion is student centred but tutor lead.
  • The discussion allows the students to integrate knowledge gained while exploring the case.
  • The tutor helps facilitate group discussion.
  • The tutor helps by correcting incorrect statements the students may make and by helping to explain difficult concepts.
  • The tutor does not lecture, dominate discussion or become the focus of group discussion.

Training Materials

The CBL Training Slides should be read prior to undertaking your first CBL session.  These detail what CBL involves, the structure of CBL, the role of the CBL tutor, what should happen before and during the session and possible problems that may arise and solutions to these.

This video is a demonstration of CBL session in action. The case is taken from the cardiovascular week and is based on a patient who had an acute myocardial infarction.  The video is 35 minutes in duration and is provided as an illustration of the type of format of a general CBL session.

Tutor Feedback

Tutors who sign up to take a CBL group on four or more dates during the 15 week period will be given the opportunity to obtain individualised feedback and a constructive review of their teaching.   Tutors will be evaluated on their final CBL session by the students within their CBL group.   Afterwards the evaluation forms will be reviewed by the Year 3 Team and a report will be emailed to you.

Topics, Dates and Venues

CBL Tutorials take place in Phase 3 (the first 15 weeks of Year 3) within Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital and the Wolfson Medical School Building.  You can register your availability here.

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Suzanne McDowall Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8072


Clinical Attachments

Educational Supervisor Opportunities

Students are generally allocated to a Consultant in one ward; sometimes they will delegate clinical teaching to another member of their team - FY1 & FY2 grade doctors and Specialist Training Registrars are well placed to deliver teaching.


When are Clinical Attachments undertaken?

Clinical Attachments are undertaken during Phase 4 of the curriculum (from the middle of year three onwards).

What Clinical Attachments do students undertake?

Child Health 5 weeks
Emergency Medicine 5 weeks
ENT/Ophthalmology 5 weeks
General Practice 5 weeks
Medicine 1 x 10 weeks & 1 x 5 week
Musculoskeletal Medicine 5 weeks
Neurology/Cardiology 5 weeks
Obstetrics & Gynaecology 5 weeks
Psychiatry 5 weeks
Surgery 2 x 5 weeks

Role of an Educational Supervisor

This involves supervising a student/s programme and assessment as follows:

  • Ensuring the clinical attachment has a mini curriculum and learning objectives.
  • Observe the student taking a history and/or examining a patient and doing what they would normally do in that situation (Mini-CEX).
  • Discuss a case in which the student has been involved (Case-based Discussion).
  • Look at and assess the students’ portfolio of clinical cases (Portfolio Cases).
  • Provide formative feedback to the student.
  • Complete an assessment of the student’s attachment, this will take place on the Glasgow Undergraduate Medical ePortfolio (GUMeP).

    View an example of a Mini-CEX form
    View an example of a Case-based Discussion Form
    View an example of a Portfolio Case Evaluation Sheet

Benefits for an Educational Supervisor

  • Ability to engage with senior medical students for the duration of their attachment.
  • Useful for job planning in maintaining or increasing SPA allocation.
  • Useful for formalising ratification in the Recognition of Training process.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School, which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Suzanne McDowall  Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8072


Clinical Skills

Clinical Skills Opportunities

The Medical School recruits clinicians from FY1 onwards to contribute towards Clinical Skills Teaching.

What are Clinical Skills?

Clinical skills begin in year one and continue through to the end of the programme. In the first two years, dedicated clinical skill sessions are conducted in the Clinical Skills Suite within the Wolfson Medical School Building. Specific topics are covered in each year. When students move to serial clinical attachments in Phase 4 of the programme, clinical skills are delivered in the hospital setting.

Students are expected to look at podcasts where relevant (e.g. venepuncture) and relevant teaching materials (in specific Clinical Skills Year handbook), prior to Clinical Skills teaching sessions. Students learn, practice and repeat a procedure several times.

In senior years, further Clinical Skills sessions in specific clinical attachments and simulation sessions provides the opportunity to reproduce a real life setting for educational purposes, learn from mistakes, fine tune techniques and master clinical protocols before undertaking the same scenario on an actual patient. Simulation also provides experience with complex practical procedures requiring teamwork, communication skills and decision making. 

MBChB1-5 Clinical Skills Programme

Resources

Video podcasts and other online resources are available to supplement clinical skills sessions.  The focus in the early years is on clinical assessment, including normal clinical history and examination and clinical procedural skills; with the focus being on pathological findings and diagnosis in the later years of the course.

  • Clinical Skills podcasts (You need to download ITunes to access these)
  • Clinical Skills videos on YouTube
  • E-Bookvia GU library or NHS Lanarkshire, Ayrshire and Arran, and GGC library sites - The Royal Marsden Hospital Manual of Clinical Nursing Procedures Dougherty, L, Lister, S (edits) (2015).  For each specific clinical procedural skill, the specific pages numbers will be listed

Benefits for a Clinical Skills Tutor

  • Tutors will be given a certificate confirming their participation in the teaching session/s.
  • The majority of Royal Colleges recognise contributions to teaching and assessment in their professional development programmes.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

Contact us 

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

med-sch-library@glasgow.ac.uk, Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8022


General Practice

General Practice Teaching Opportunities

General Practice recruits General Practitioners to teach students in the following areas of the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum.


Vocational Studies (Years 1 and 2)

Vocational Studies (VS) is an integral part of first and second year medical student education, covering clinical skills, ethics, professional values, and communication skills.

VS is taught during term times on Tuesdays (am and pm), Wednesdays (am), and Thursdays (am and pm). Most tutors undertake one session a week, primarily in the Wolfson Medical School Building, although some clinical skills sessions and project work are undertaken at GP practices.

It is ideal if prospective tutors are already associated with a practice in the west of Scotland which can be used as a base for teaching clinical skills.

Clinical Practice in the Community (Year 3)

Students attend general practice in groups of two or three for one day every two weeks from October to January. Tutors may choose seven days of teaching (one group of students), 14 days of teaching (two groups attending on alternate weeks) or more, as agreed. The teaching days are either Tuesdays or Thursdays. It is perfectly acceptable for GPs in a practice to share the teaching involvement. The payment for teaching is £1,100 per student. The fee is paid gross by the health board and includes superannuation.

In a typical day, students may observe surgeries, or practice clinics, and will be expected to conduct short consultations under supervision in a ‘student surgery’. During their placement they will make two home visits to two patients, chosen by their GP Tutor, who have chronic and multi-morbid health problems. This will help them gain some insight into living with chronic health problems. Each day, students should have some time to practise their clinical examination skills on real patients under supervision. At the end of the year students are assessed on their CPC experiences with the Longitudinal Portfolio, and their clinical skills are assessed in the Year 3 OSCE. The CPC module is well evaluated. Students really enjoy their general practice placement and the experience they gain from talking to and examining patients.

Students work independently to complete their Longitudinal Portfolio. They compile a referral letter for one of their patients with chronic disease, and also submit reflective work on two ‘acute’ cases they have seen in their student surgery, and on one of their patients with chronic disease. Finally they do an oral presentation to the primary health care team about one of their patients with chronic health care needs.

Communication Skills (Year 3)

This course builds on the communication skills which the students have practised as part of Vocational Studies in Year 1 and Year 2.

Communication Skills tutors work with small groups of seven to eight students and will tackle more demanding scenarios such as: breaking bad news, difficult communication, ethical dilemmas. This third year course is delivered over five sessions on Tuesdays (am), Wednesdays (am) or Thursdays (am) running from September to January. Payment is currently £120 per session and payments are made as personal fees (with tax deducted) by the university.

Ideally, tutors will register for one group of students (i.e. five sessions).   However, if this is not possible, the tutor may opt for fewer sessions, and provide cover, where required, for an existing tutor.   

The course is based in the Medical School and does not require you to be working in a practice.

Clinical Studies General Practice Attachment (Year 4 or 5)

One student is based in your general practice for five continuous weeks as part of the clinical rotation which spans the final two years of the curriculum. The emphasis of the rotation is on student-centred learning, and supervisors will help students to identify learning objectives for the attachment.

Supervisors are asked to spend one hour each week reviewing the student’s progress – helping them to meet their learning objectives, discussing portfolio cases (two required in five weeks) and providing feedback on and assessment of their general performance.

The usual week will also include four ‘teaching surgeries’ (with the supervisor or other partners), where extra time is allowed for discussion and teaching, and a short ‘student surgery’ where the student conducts the consultation and is given constructive feedback. Students are encouraged to lead all, or part of, as many consultations with patients as possible. The remainder of the week is allocated for personal study time or for ‘flexible sessions’, where students may undertake various activities, agreed in consultation with their supervisor. Input to learning is expected from the whole practice team.

There are eight GP blocks during the academic year but practices may offer as many or as few placements as they wish: the average is two to three per year. The fee for each placement is £1,640 and is paid gross by the health board and includes superannuation.

Associate Teaching Practice

Associate Teaching Practices provide the context for students in Years 1 and 2 to explore the role of general practice in the community and provide access to patients for clinical teaching. Through this system students learn how a GP surgery functions by meeting different members of the practice team. They also receive an introduction to other aspects of how the practice works.

Students are always accompanied by their own Vocational Studies tutor who is medically trained and provides the clinical teaching. The tutors are typically salaried GPs who do not have their own practice. There are normally four to eight students on each visit. Much of the time is spent in the patients’ homes although sometimes a room is required in the surgery.

The services of Associate Teaching Practices are normally provided by GP partners who are required to identify appropriate patients and occasionally provide a room suitable for teaching.

Further information

For further information, please visit here.

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest, please email:

gpteachingopps@glasgow.ac.uk


OSCE Examinations

OSCE Examiner Opportunities

The Medical School recruits clinicians from ST1 onwards to examine in the Medical School OSCEs (although, ideally OSCE examiners should be experienced clinicians - Consultants, GPs, Senior Training Grades or Speciality Doctors). 

The involvement of experienced clinicians in our assessment processes is essential for the provision of suitably trained and evaluated medical graduates to the Health Service. 


What are OSCEs?

Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) are a fundamental component of the University of Glasgow’s summative assessment of student's clinical skills throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. 

An OSCE is a performance-based test used to measure candidates’ clinical competence, where components of competence are assessed objectively in a planned and structured way.

Candidates:

  • Are observed and evaluated as they go through a series of stations and perform a variety of clinical tasks.
  • Interview, examine and treat patients or actors/volunteers (simulated patients) who present with a medical problem.

Role of an OSCE Examiner

Examiners play a vital role in the OSCE process in delivering a reliable and fair assessment process and are:

  • Expected to attend OSCE Examiner Training (3-hour session).
  • Required to have up-to-date Equality and Diversity Training.
  • Required to examine half or full day OSCE sessions as agreed.
  • Required to carefully observe all candidates' performances for the duration of the OSCE station.

Benefits for an OSCE Examiner

  • Examiners will be given a certificate confirming their participation in the OSCE.
  • Examiners will receive feedback on their marking.
  • Contributions to the assessment of undergraduate medical students are recognised within appraisal and GMC revalidation processes.
  • The majority of Medical Royal Colleges also recognise contributions to teaching and assessment in their professional development programmes.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

Typical Format of an OSCE

Examiners will be informed at least 6 weeks prior to the examination of the date, time and venue for the OSCE.

On the day of the OSCE a Clinical Lead will be present for briefing examiners, troubleshooting and answering all clinical queries with regards to all stations.  

The 5-minute OSCE examiner briefing will be shown fifteen minutes prior to the start of the OSCE, after this has been shown you will be asked to go to your station.

Examiners are responsible for the running of their station.  All stations should have been prepared accordingly, however prior to the start of the examination examiners are required to check this personally:

  • In history taking or communication-based stations, examiners must run over the narrative with the real or simulated patient.
  • In examination stations examiners must examine the patient to ascertain the negative and positive findings.  
  • If relevant for the station examiners must make sure that the apparatus or components are all present and that disposal and hand washing facilities are adequate.

During the station examiners are required to make an item by item judgement using the criterion marking schedule.  Examiners must give a mark if the task is completed accurately and if a task is not attempted, incomplete or inadequately performed examiners do not award the mark.  Examiners must complete the mark sheet contemporaneously as the candidates are performing their task.  Additional to the criterion mark sheet, all examiners are asked to make an unrelated and separate global judgement of the candidate.  It is absolutely critical for the success of the OSCE that these two separate decisions (item by item judgements and global judgement) represent independent judgements.  Examiners must not use the total score to validate the global judgement.

Examiners should take time at the end of the circuit to evaluate their station. After the OSCE all Speciality Leads will receive a copy of the evaluation forms completed for their station, and are required to take on board all comments, including making necessary improvements to their station for the next diet in which this will run.

Examiner Training

The Medical School recommends that all new examiners attend OSCE Examiner Training comprising a 3-hour session.  Examiner Training takes place twice yearly, in January and May.

Training outlines the role of the examiner in OSCEs, explains how we set standards and gives participants the opportunity to mark stations and discuss variation in marking.

You will receive a certificate confirming your attendance at the training.  The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow award three CPD points for this educational exercise.

OSCE Briefing

The 5-minute OSCE Examiner Briefing: View the OSCE Examiners’ Briefing - is emailed to all examiners one week prior to examining and is also shown to all examiners fifteen minutes before the start of each examination session. If examiners have not viewed the briefing in their own time, it is compulsory for them to sit through the briefing on the day of the OSCE.

The OSCE Examiner Instructions Booklet: Read the OSCE Examiner Instructions - is emailed to all examiners one week prior to examining and is also available to all examiners in each OSCE station on the day of the OSCE.  This advises examiners what they must do to prepare for their station and how their conduct should be throughout the station.

Examiner Feedback

After all OSCEs, examiners receive an individualised statistical analysis report detailing their performance as an examiner.   

The aim of the report is for examiners to reflect on their performance in comparison to fellow examiners.  Some examiners may be more stringent or lenient and it is important for examiners to review this information, and if necessary consider how they may change their practice in future OSCEs.

Each report details:

  • The station/s they marked.
  • The median pass mark of the station/s they marked.
  • The station statistics, including: their mean mark only, the mean mark for each station excluding their marks, the overall station mean mark including their marks and the standard deviation for each of these (calculated -/+ 2 standard deviations of the mean).
  • Station statistics by venue for site comparisons.
  • Station statistics by day for comparison of the marking over a number of days.

Examiners are recommended to attend further OSCE examiner training, if their mean mark is outwith -/+ 2 standard deviations of the mean of the station they examined.

View an example of the Individualised Statistical Analysis Report

OSCE Dates and Venues

Students undertake summative OSCEs in Years 2, 3 and 5 and these take place in the Wolfson Medical School Building and Hospital Sites. 

View the OSCE dates and venues that require cover.

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Suzanne McDowall Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8072


Problem Based Learning

Problem Based Learning Opportunities

The Medical School recruits academic staff, clinicians from FY1 onwards, postdoctoral fellows employed by the College of MVLS at the time training takes place, and current PGR students in the College of MVLS (in Year 2 or beyond) to contribute to Problem Based Learning (PBL).


When and where is PBL undertaken?

PBL is undertaken in Phase 1 (Semester 1 of Year 1) and Phase 2 (Semester 2 of Year 1 and all of Year 2) and takes place within the Wolfson Medical School Building.

What is PBL?

PBL tutorials are small group sessions, with a Facilitator, and are based around clinical scenarios. 

PBL allows students to test their understanding of topics through facilitated discussion, and to integrate material from different disciplines/specialties.  The PBL Facilitator is likely to have expertise in a discipline/specialty relevant to the integrated PBL scenario.

Role of a PBL Facilitator

  • Attend and complete Sessions 1, 2a/b and 3 of the Facilitator Training Programme (8 hours).
  • Meet with your PBL group, twice weekly, for either 1 or 2 hours, for 4 to 6 weeks (total contact time is generally from 8 to 12 hours for different teaching blocks, although the Head, Neck and Neuro block has ~24 hours contact time).
  • Help students to develop self-directed learning skills, rather than act as a direct provider of information.
  • When required, conduct formative assessment interviews with students in facilitated groups (provide feedback on their performance in PBL).
  • Participate in the peer observation programme for quality assurance purposes (one reciprocal observation within a two year period).

Benefits for a PBL Facilitator

  • After training, and facilitation of a full teaching block, all Facilitators are entitled to receive a certificate confirming their contribution to PBL.
  • Facilitators receive feedback by participating in the peer observation programme.
  • Facilitators have access to a Moodle-based (electronic) resource and also to the relevant student Virtual Learning Environment.
  • Facilitators are invited to attend specific staff development sessions (5 or 6 per academic session).
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

PBL Facilitator Training Programme

All PBL Facilitators are required to undertake the Medical School’s PBL Training Programme prior to facilitating.

View a description of the sessions that comprise the Training Programme.

Peer Observation

Participation in this process will give you the opportunity to reflect on the quality of your facilitation in the Medical School.

The aims of peer observation are to:

  • Provide staff with formative feedback about the quality and style of their facilitation.
  • Provide a mechanism for identifying good practice.
  • Increase discussion of facilitation.
  • Reflect on your own practice by observation of peers and reflection on comments of being observed.
  • Learn from observing and being observed.
  • View the Peer Observation Process.

Topics and Dates

PBL takes place within the Wolfson Medical School Building. 

View the topics and dates requiring cover in Session 2018/2019

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Elaine Jamieson Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6499


Student Selected Components

Student Selected Components Opportunities

The Medical School recruits clinicians from ST5 onwards to supervise Student Selected Components (SSCs).


What are Student Selected Components?

Student Selected Components (SSCs) complement the MBChB degree programme by offering students the opportunity to choose subjects they wish to study in depth. This fulfils the GMC requirement which states that a minimum of 10% of the curriculum should be made available for student choice.

It is for each UK medical school to design its own SSC programme to suit its own circumstances. In the University of Glasgow this takes the form of a 5 week dedicated block selected by students from a wide range of options and is undertaken once in each of year 2, 3 and 4. SSCs are delivered across a variety of teaching formats and cover topics such as research projects, the study of core curriculum-related topics in more depth, and topics outside medicine including humanities and languages.

Although programmes vary between medical schools, the GMC provide the following guidance as to what particular skills students should have the opportunity to develop:

  • Learn about and begin to develop and use research skills.
  • Have greater control over their own learning and develop their self-directed learning skills.
  • Study, in depth, topics of particular interest outside the core curriculum.
  • Develop greater confidence in their own skills and abilities.
  • Present the results of their work verbally, visually or in writing.
  • Consider potential career paths.  

Typical SSC Project Titles can be found here.

Role of a SSC Supervisor

  • Provide a written outline for a 5 week module including aims and intended learning outcomes (template provided).  
  • Decide on the delivery method of the SSC.
  • Decide on which block(s) and the number of student places (i.e. 1-2 per block, more if applicable).
  • Set aside time to supervise – this varies according to the nature of the SSC.
  • Consider the most appropriate method for assessing the SSC (at least 60% written format with remainder usually being supervisor’s assessment and/or oral presentation).
  • Encourage the development of a wide and varied range of skills such as curiosity, the ability to critically evaluate evidence, problem-solving and generic skills.

Benefits of an SSC Supervisor

  • Satisfaction from supervising enthusiastic and interested students for an intense 5 week period. 
  • Anonymised student feedback is provided which can be included in job planning and appraisals.
  • Help with clinical governance tasks such as audits, reviews, clinical effectiveness, etc.
  • Increase the potential for future recruitment into your speciality: View footage from a former student
  • Improve staff skills and training such as supervision and assessment expertise.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

How do I find out more?

  • We are always keen to encourage more staff to offer modules and can provide guidance and support.  SSC student, supervisor and assessor guides can be found here.

SSC Dates

SSC Dates (each consisting of a five week block):

 

Session 2019/2020

Session 2020/2021

Year 4

2nd Sept - 4th Oct 2019

7th Oct - 8th Nov 2019

11th Nov - 13th Dec 2019

13th Jan - 14th Feb 2020

31st Aug - 2nd Oct 2020

5th Oct - 6th Nov 2020

9th Nov - 11th Dec 2020

11th Jan - 12th Feb 2021

Year 2

13th Jan - 14th Feb 2020 

11th Jan - 12th Feb 2021

Year 3

24th Feb - 27th Mar 2020

30th Mar - 1st May 2020

4th May - 5th Jun 2020

22nd Feb - 26th Mar 2021

29th Mar - 30th Apr 2021

3rd May - 4th Jun 2021

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please email: 

med-sch-ssc@glasgow.ac.uk


Written Examinations

Written Examination Opportunities

The Medical School recruits academic members of staff and clinicians involved in teaching to contribute to our summative written examinations.

Students undertake summative written examinations in all Years of the MBChB curriculum.  All written assessments are integrated to examine a number of different subjects and specialities. 

See below opportunities to get involved in MBChB written examinations:


Single Best Answer Multiple Choice Question Writing (SBA)

Single Best Answer Multiple Choice Questions (SBAs) are best of 5 multiple choice items. There is an increase in the detail of clinical content in the question lead-in as students’ progress through the course. These are developed to test both knowledge and the application of knowledge.

Involves:

  • Attending an SBA writing workshop to explore the underlying theory and practice of producing SBA questions for the exams (2 hour session).
  • Writing questions to assess learning outcomes (minimum 5 items).
  • Attending an SBA quality assurance workshop to ensure items in the question bank are of a consistent high standard.

Experience required:

  • Teaching experience of one or more aspects of the undergraduate MBChB course.
  • Subject expertise relating to specific course ILOs.

Benefits:

  • The Medical School will provide you with a certificate confirming your contribution to undergraduate assessment.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

Modified Essay and Short Note Questions Writing (MEQ & SN)

Modified Essay Questions (MEQs) use a short answer response format in the context of an unfolding authentic clinical scenario.  These questions integrate all aspects of the curriculum and hence they are not subject specific (although they may be based on a specific system or theme). These test both knowledge and knowledge application.

Short Note Questions (SNs) are short essay type questions and they are usually used to allow students to demonstrate more integrated application of knowledge. They are also used to assess understanding of psychosocial and ethical issues not easily assessed by more objective formats.

Phase 1 and 2 Involves:

  • Liaison with the Year Director on specific exam requirements.
  • Development of scenarios in conjunction with the Examination Team or Teaching Block Team.
  • Writing of questions and marking schemes to fit in with the scenario development.
  • Marking a section of the MEQ related to subject expertise.
  • Writing and marking a Short Note Question on own subject area.

Phase 3 and 4 Involves:

  • Liaison with the Year Director on specific exam requirements.
  • Development of specific MEQs relating to subject specialism.
  • Writing of questions and marking schemes to fit in with the scenario development.
  • Marking an MEQ related to subject expertise.
  • Writing and marking a Short Note question on own subject area.

Experience required:

  • Teaching experience of one or more aspects of the undergraduate MBChB course.
  • Subject expertise relating to specific course ILOs.

Benefits:

  • Marking exam scripts gives feedback on students’ performance in specific subject areas.
  • The Medical School will provide you with a certificate confirming your contribution to undergraduate assessment.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.

Standard Setting

Standard Setting (Modified Angoff Method) is used to set the pass score of all written examinations.  A panel is established to set the Angoff score. This is comprised of between 6-10 academic members of staff who have had a close involvement either with teaching of the specific year group or are involved with the development of the curriculum.  Members of the panel are asked to look at the written papers and individually judge how a borderline, minimally competent student would perform on each question. The panel then meet and discuss their scores and they are allowed to alter their mark in the light of the discussion. The scores for each panel member are then totalled for the paper and the median score for all the markers is used as the pass score.

Although there are no stand-alone summative MCQ exams, the MCQ papers that are part of the written exams are also standard set using the modified Angoff method. The nominal pass score for this paper is added to the written component and an overall pass score is determined.

Involves:

  • Attendance at a Standard Setting Training Workshop to explore the theory of standard setting and the practical application of common standard setting methodologies such as angoff, hoftsee and OSCE borderline methodologies (2 hour session).
  • Attendance at a standard setting angoff panel meeting for a specified year group.

Experience required:

  • Experience of teaching undergraduate MBChB students and awareness of the standard and scope of ILOs for a particular year group.

Benefits:

  • The Medical School will provide you with a certificate confirming your contribution to undergraduate assessment.
  • Promotes interaction with the Medical School which can be formalised by applying for honorary status.            

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact the relevant Curriculum Support Administrator:

Year 1 Curriculum Support Administrator: Ms Elaine Jamieson Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6499
Year 2 Curriculum Support Administrator: Mrs Nicola Cumming Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6241
Year 3 Curriculum Support Administrator: Mrs Hannah MacKay Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8036
Year 4&5 Curriculum Support Administrator: Miss Angela Davie Phone: +44 (0)141 330 2901


Year 1&2 Hospital Visits

Year 1&2 Hospital Teaching Opportunities

Year 1 and 2 hospital visits may be hosted by a Consultant (or Deputy) or Senior Nurse.


Year 1 Hospital Visits

Summary of Year One Hospital Teaching

For the Non-acute Medical Ward and/or Care of the Elderly Ward and Emergency Medicine visits you will host a group of 8-10 students and their Vocational Studies (VS) Tutor. The Tutor is usually a GP and is present to accompany the students rather than deliver the teaching. 

For the Cardiovascular/Respiratory visits you will host a group of 4-5 students.

When will the visits take place?

The visits will take place on a Tuesday morning, Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday morning:

Teaching Day 

Teaching to be offeredNumber of students per group

Number of groups requiring hospital placements

30/31 Oct

Non-acute Medical Ward and/or Care of the Elderly Ward 9-10 15
13/14 Nov Non-acute Medical Ward and/or Care of the Elderly Ward 9-10 15
12/13 March Cardiovascular/Respiratory 4-5 30
19/20 March Cardiovascular/Respiratory 4-5 30
23/24 April Emergency Medicine  9-10 10
30 April/1 May Emergency Medicine  9-10 10

The visits are timed to start at 9.30am for morning visits and 2.30pm for afternoon visits.  The expectation is that visits will last two hours and no longer than two and a half hours. 

Briefing the students

A room for briefing and debriefing will need to be identified beforehand and a secure place to leave coats and bags is essential.

The host is asked to describe the context of hospital/hospice care and to describe the work of members of the multi-disciplinary team.

Activities with the student

  • Identify and consent a minimum of 4 volunteer patients to speak with 2 students for approximately 30 minutes on their experience of being a patient.
  • Assign pairs of students to different members of the team so that the students can find out what the professionals do.
  • At the end of the visit you should join the VS Tutor to debrief the students on the visit.

Confirmation of Teaching

A certificate for teaching that can be used for appraisal purposes can be provided by the Medical School.

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Ms Elaine Jamieson Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6499


Year 2 Hospital Visits

Summary of Year Two Hospital Teaching

You will host a group of 4-5 students.

Students will have six teaching visits. Visits are for clinical bedside teaching of history taking and clinical examinations.

When will the visits take place?

The visits will take place on a Wednesday morning, Thursday morning or Thursday afternoon:

Teaching Day History Taking and Examination System to be TaughtNumber of students per groupNumber of groups requiring hospital placements

31 Oct/1 Nov

Gastrointestinal System/Renal 

4-5

30 (Wed am x 10; Thurs am x 10; Thurs pm x 10)

7/8 Nov

Gastrointestinal System/Renal 

4-5

30 (Wed am x 10; Thurs am x 10; Thurs pm x 10)

27/28 Feb

Musculoskeletal/Neurology

4-5

30 (Wed am x 10; Thurs am x 10; Thurs pm x 10)

6/7 March

Musculoskeletal/Neurology

4-5

30 (Wed am x 10; Thurs am x 10; Thurs pm x 10)

The visits are timed to start at 9.30am for morning visits and 2.30pm for afternoon visits.  The expectation is that visits will last two and a half hours. 

Briefing the students

A room for briefing and debriefing will need to be identified beforehand and a secure place to leave coats and bags is essential.

Activities with the student

  • Identify two to four patients and consent them for teaching.
  • Observe the students taking a history. Alternatively send them in pairs to take a history and after a period join them and ask them to feedback the history. History-taking should focus on symptoms in the presenting complaint, history of presenting complaint and relevant questions relating to the body system. Systematic enquiry is not expected at this stage (as they may not have learned these other systems) though students should be expected to enquire about past medical history, medication, social and personal history, and patient concerns.
  • Observe the students examining a patient. You should try to organise that every student gets an opportunity to do this. Please instruct them and help them to develop their skills. They should have been shown how to examine patients according to the system on the online clinical teaching films. 

Confirmation of Teaching

A certificate for teaching that can be used for appraisal purposes can be provided by the Medical School.

 

Contact us

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact:

Mrs Nicola Cumming Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6241

MBChB1&2 Clinical Skills booklet
MBChB1&2 Hospital Sub Dean Handbook
MBChB1&2 Summarised Briefing Notes


Honorary Status: is awarded in recognition of an individual’s contribution to teaching, research and scholarship in the College.  For further details please visit Honorary Status Appointment Information.

Lectures

Lecture Opportunities

The Medical School recruits academic members of staff and clinicians to undertake large group lectures.

Lectures are the main form of didactic teaching, these typically last up to one hour, and are focussed on specific topics. 

Whilst students are expected to attend lectures, these are streamed on-line and podcast for revision purposes.  Podcast lectures are typically available for two weeks after the lecture, in the run up to the end of year examination and, where possible, are made available as downloadable files.

Contact us 

If you would like to note your interest or require further information, please contact the relevant Curriculum Support Administrator:

Year 1 Curriculum Support Administrator: Ms Elaine Jamieson Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6499
Year 2 Curriculum Support Administrator: Mrs Nicola Cumming Phone: +44 (0)141 330 6241
Year 3 Curriculum Support Administrator: Mrs Hannah MacKay Phone: +44 (0)141 330 8036
Year 4&5 Curriculum Support Administrator: Miss Angela Davie Phone: +44 (0)141 330 2901