What our students say

Find out what some of our current students are saying about the MRes Economics programme.

"The programme helped me to define the area I want to work on and to figure out my position among other researchers in the field"

student

Can you tell us a little bit about your current Research?

I am concerned with climate change and ways to mitigate it. My research focuses on the theory behind countries’ interaction on this issue as well as domestic policies. Using game theory, I model the interaction between nations who would all benefit from polluting less but in the short run might suffer from implementing such policies.

Why did you choose to study the MRes in Glasgow?

I have obtained my undergraduate degree in Russia. At the time, I was fascinated with behavioural economics and neuroeconomics, which led me to consider staying in academia and continuing with research.

I was not yet ready to be a fully independent research so I needed an advanced programme that would feature a certain number of classes per week, not too many or too little, and a supervisor who is keen to take me on with my ideas. MRes was just a perfect place.

Can you describe what an average MRes week looks like?

We would have maybe 16 hours of classes (3-4 days a week) and loads of homework. Most of the time the homework was not graded, but you had to study hard to keep up with the subject. Maths was especially challenging, but I do believe that it makes for the foundation of a good researcher.

The programme encourages students to ‘grow up’ and learn to do research not because someone told them to, but because there is a question in their heads that is never going to be answered but that they still want to get closer to the answer.

What have you enjoyed most about the programme?

I enjoyed the taught modules a lot: they were challenging, interesting, informative, and gave us a chance to work in groups. I think we were truly lucky with the professors who taught us, they are the best in the department.

The small class size meant that everyone had a chance to ask questions and participate in discussions, and the number of classes per week allowed me to spend time on subjects that I found most interesting and important for my future research.

How has the programme helped you with your current PhD?

The programme helped me to define the area I want to work on and to figure out my position among other researchers in the field. It gave me the necessary tools and knowledge so that I know how to turn my ideas into rigorous mathematical models. It’s taught me how to be self-motivating. And most importantly, it has taught me that there is no one right way to solve something, that there is always room for a different perspective and more questions waiting to be answered.

Would you recommend the programme to prospective students?

Yes, I would totally recommend the programme.

Firstly, it will teach you everything you need to know about contemporary economics to be able to do quality research.

Secondly, it will connect you to brilliant researchers in your field and provide support for you to meet even more during conferences, seminars, and workshops.

Thirdly, it will be fun but challenging two years that will prepare you to become a good PhD student, with your own vision and the ability to make that vision a reality.

Describe the programme in 3 words?

Challenging

Broad

Fundamental


"I enjoyed learning from some of the best researchers and academics the field of Economics has to offer."

student

Can you tell us about your current Research?

I’m a 1st year PhD student. ‘Endogenous quality choice in markets with mixed consumption externalities.’

Why did you choose to study the MRes in Glasgow?

I wanted to pursue a comprehensive PhD programme in Economics with rigorous training in the area before embarking on the research.

 To this end, the MRes/PHD programme at Glasgow was a relatively new offering. The prestige of the university coupled with the highly experienced and renowned faculty members, especially in my field of interest (Microeconomic Theory), encouraged me to apply.

The city of Glasgow also played an important role. When I was in Warwick for my MSc, I visited Glasgow for two days and instantly fell in love with the city and the friendliness of the people. I figured I would want to spend 5 years of my life in a place that is welcoming and happy to have me, and never regretted that choice.

What have you enjoyed most about the programme?

I’ve never been challenged as much in my academic career before starting this programme.

The programme was very intensive, especially compared with the MSc I completed prior to it, and being able to finish it well felt very satisfying. I enjoyed learning from some of the best researchers and academics the field of Economics has to offer.

This programme was different from my MSc in the way that although the MSc was a good degree to teach me analytical skills, this programme also enhanced my creativity and research skills. At the end I felt quite ready to embark on the PhD, much more so than two years before.

What did an average MRes week look like?

In a typical week in the first year there would be around 12 hours of lectures. The modules were assessed through exams. Outside of the lectures a lot of time was sent on preparing for those lectures and self-study.

The lecture hours were decreased in the second year, but the amount of time required for independent study was higher. In addition, some of us were appointed as Teaching Assistants in the second year and some portion of the week required us teaching tutorials to undergraduate students.

How has the MRes helped you in your current PhD?

The MRes gave me the comprehensive training that I needed before starting the PhD. The core courses in the first year gave me the required theoretical foundation while the field courses in the second year helped me narrow my research interests. Out-of-class interactions with faculty members and especially my supervisor played a major role.

What is it like to study and live in Glasgow as a student?

Glasgow is an amazing place to live. The city is very friendly and has an energetic atmosphere and I am very happy to call it my second home.

I feel intellectually more capable than I felt two years back, and now I have considerably more tools and skills at my disposal for a decent thesis.

Discipline, hard work, patience, and persistence will all play an important role in succeeding in this programme.


"Our professors’ expertise, enthusiasm, and kindness have impressed me the most during the course."

student

Can you tell us about your current Research?

My research is in financial economics. I am trying to implement some innovative methods in multiple hypothesis testing to assess performance of hedge funds.

Why did you choose to study MRes in Economics?

I chose this course because I think it will prepare me for doing research in economics as well as other related areas.

Could you describe what an average MRes week looks like?

The first year was quite intensive as we had lectures every weekday, a heavy workload outside the classroom, and a lot of exams at the end.

Despite the challenges, it was good to see how my knowledge and interests fit in different areas of economics. At the end of the year I learned a lot about how to do academic economics research.

The second year is milder as we only have 6 to 8 class hours per week. This means I have more time to study on my own as a research and I love this. It is nice to have more time to read about my favourite topics and to deepen my knowledge through literature papers.

What have you enjoyed most about the programme?

Learning new things on the MRes has always been an interesting journey, especially because I am taught by some very nice professors who are there not only to teach but also to inspire young researchers.

Our professors’ expertise, enthusiasm, and kindness have impressed me the most during the course.

The school is very nice and people who work here are friendly and willing to support. This is a good environment for new students to build friendships. There are many PhDs in economics and finance here which makes it a good environment to exchange ideas and develop networks for my future research.

How do you feel the programme helped you in your future career?

Becoming a professional in investment and related areas has been my dream since I was a child and I enjoy working as a researcher in this area now.

This course has provided me with a robust foundation in logical thinking to use in areas closer to my specific interests.

With my plan of doing a PhD, this course has helped me a lot in becoming more familiar with research, gaining relevant knowledge, and the ability to read literatures in a variety of economics areas as well as finding and focusing on the topics for the research based on my interests.

Would you recommend this programme to prospective students?

Absolutely. Besides the benefit of building a firm foundation and extending the research network, studying the MRes at the University of Glasgow can give you a great opportunity to become a PhD student.

This department has many potential PhD supervisors who are doing research in different subareas of economics, finance, and other related areas. The diversity in the research areas gives MRes students a high chance of finding out a supervisor who will fit with their interests.

In addition, the reputation of the University and the intensiveness of the programme means that it is easy for the graduates to continue onto the PHD here or elsewhere.

Three words that describe the programme.

Challenging, inspiring, high value.


"The small number of students has allowed us to form strong bonds and allowed us to help and support each other."

student

Can you tell us a little bit about your current Research?

I am currently researching bullying in an economic setting using a mechanism design approach.

I want to investigate the ways in which we can implement an equilibrium where bullying, either in a school, organisational or any other environment, is detected and reported as soon as it happens.

Thus, agents do not have to suffer the cost inflicted to them and would be able to fight the social stigma attached to being a victim of physical and psychological torment.

Why did you choose to study the MRes in Economics at Glasgow?

I chose this programme as it is one of the few postgraduate programmes that would allow me to further study Game Theory and Behavioural Economics with some of the best professors in the field, such as Professor Hervé Moulin and Professor Sayantan Ghosal.

Additionally, this course is designed to provide the students with an in-depth understanding of the foundations of both micro- and macroeconomics which is an invaluable skill for pursuing a PhD.

Can you describe what an average MRes week looks like?

The MRes programme is a demanding one, so usually the day will start with attending lectures. Once the lectures are over, I would go to the library to catch up with our studying and work towards any assignments that are due. Usually I’d stay there until late in the evening.

Even if the workload is heavy I would make time to attend the weekly seminars with guest speakers from all around the word. Good time management is key, so usually I would try to keep a day of the weekend off and hang out with friends or explore the city.

What have you enjoyed most about the programme? How is it different from other PG or research degrees?

As with most PG programmes, the MRes Economics Programme is intense and demanding. However, it offers as great range of modules and is not simply focusing on one small area of economics.

The small number of students has allowed us to form strong bonds and allowed us to help and support each other.

This and the fact that we are preparing to become PhD students changes the lecturers’ attitude towards us, making our relationships less formal. We are able to contact them at all times and discuss any concerns and ideas we have about the programme and our future research.

Moreover, through the MRes course we get to engage with the Economics PhD students who have greatly helped us, especially morally, in dealing with the difficulties of the course and have given us a glimpse into the PhD life.

The fact that we are preparing to become PhD students reflects in the lecturers’ attitude towards us, making our relationship less formal. We are able to contact them at all times and discuss any concerns and ideas we have about the programme and our future research. The fact that it is a two-year two programme has given us the opportunity to engage deeply with your research.

Additionally, the fact that it is a two-year programme has given us the opportunity to deeply engage with our research.

How do you feel the programme will help your career plans?

I hope it will help me achieve a career in academia. Through the intensity and diversity of the course I feel ready to face any challenge, be it in the academic or private sector.

It has opened my mind to different ways of thinking, has given me the ability to be open to all forms of learning and has equipped me with numerous skills such as presentation, public speaking, teamwork and time-management.

Having to study for modules that I hadn’t faced during my undergraduate programme meant that I had to put in extensive hours of work, which did not always lead to the desired outcome. This has been a great lesson in dealing with hardships and setbacks, all unavoidable situations that anyone will face during their career.

Describe the programme in 3 words?

Challenging, inspiring, rewarding.