Open Research Resources

Our Open Research pages offer:

There is an informal open research working group at the University and we are planning to roll out some wider open research 'champion' type groups as well as an open to all open research discussion channel.

There are also a wide range of other resources relating to open research; these are listed below. If you’re looking for support in a particular area, and you can’t find it here, please get in touch with us.

 

Training

Our standard introductory training courses cover best practice in research data management, data management planning, and open access for publications. This training is delivered through Moodle and Zoom and can be delivered in person on request. See our Training page for more information.

The University of Glasgow is participating in the UK Reproducibility Network Open Research Programme.  A Team from the University will coordinate the train the trainer programme and assess open research training tools and resources.   More details will be shared as activity gets underway.

 

Data Management Case Studies

The Research Data Management service collects examples of open research practice at the University of Glasgow. Below you can read case studies of the examples we have gathered so far.

If you are engaged in research and creating or working with open data and would be interested in contributing to a case study, please get in touch at research-datamanagement@glasgow.ac.uk.

 

CREATe Copyright and Licensing guides

The CREATe UK Copyright & Creative Economy Centre has produced a series of guides on licensing research data: https://datasetlicencing.wordpress.com/outputs/ as well as many other resources relating to copyright: https://www.create.ac.uk/resources/.

 

Data Availability Statements

All publications and theses should include a data accessibility/availability statement which explains where the data which support the publication can be found. Data accessibility statements should include a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) which directs readers to a record for the dataset in a repository. This way, a dataset can be cited correctly even if the data themselves are not suitable for sharing. If no data is available, a data accessibility statement should indicate this. A good data statement should also include the terms on which the data are made available.

Please note that an instruction to contact the author directly would not be considered acceptable by most research funders – authors should create a record for a dataset in an appropriate repository and direct readers there.

Your journal’s or publisher’s guidance for authors should indicate the format and placement of a data access statement. If no ‘Data access’ or ‘Data availability’ section is specified, we suggest placing your statement in the ‘Acknowledgements’ section.

For examples of data statements, please see our guide to identifiers and citation: https://edshare.gla.ac.uk/1419/

 

Support for Research Integrity

The University offers extensive support for activity that improves the integrity of research, including training and guidance: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/ris/researchpolicies/researchintegrity/.

 

Support for Data Protection and Freedom of Information

The DP/FOI Office can offer support for researchers collecting or processing personal data: https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/dpfoioffice/. For advice on where to start with Data Protection paperwork relating to a research project, see our Project Initiation Workflow for Projects Involving Personal Data.

Support for Ethics

Information about the University’s Ethics Committees can be found here: https://www.gla.ac.uk/research/strategy/ourpolicies/ethics/.

Protocols.io

The University of Glasgow provides Protocols.io premium accounts for all students and staff.

Protocols.io is an online platform for the creation, management, and sharing of research protocols or methods. Users can create new protocols within the system or upload existing methods and digitise them. Those with access to a protocol can then update, annotate, or fork it so that it can be continually improved and developed.

Users can publish their protocols making them freely available for others to use and cite or, with the enterprise version, keep them private. The tool supports the Open Science / Open Research agenda by helping to ensure that methods used to produce data and publications are made available, assisting with reproducibility.

https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/it/softwareandonlinetools/protocols-io

 

External resources

Below are a selection of resources managed by external organisations which you may find useful in thinking about open research.

The Turing Way

The Turing Way is a handbook for reproducible, ethical and collaborative data science. It is structured as a series of guides, each containing chapters which cover best practices, guidance and recommendations.  

The Turing Way is not meant to be read from start to finish. Start with a concept, tool or method that you need now, in your current work. Browse the different guides that make up the book, or use the search box to search for whatever you would like to learn about first.

 
 

UK Reproducibility Network Primers

The UKRN primers introduce different aspects of open research, intended for a broad audience. 

 
 

Open Science: A practical guide for PhD students

A UCL-produced UK guide to Open Science for PhD students, based on the original French version produced by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research.

This guide is designed to accompany you through your research, from developing your academic approach to the dissemination of your results. It provides a set of tools and best practices that can be directly implemented and is aimed at researchers from all disciplines.

Open Science: a practical guide for PhD Students