Dumbarton Castle by Alexander Nasmyth

Old Ways New Roads:
Travels in Scotland 1720-1832 

Old Ways New Roads: Travels in Scotland 1720-1832, The Hunterian’s major exhibition originally scheduled for August-November 2020, was rescheduled for January-May 2021. The second UK-wide lockdown due to the Coronavirus pandemic has led The Hunterian to move the exhibition online, so it can be explored from wherever you are.

Currently under construction, the online exhibition will feature paintings, prints, drawings, maps and more, addressing the impact of Scotland's new transport infrastructure on the development of travel, tourism and topographical descriptions between 1720 and 1832.

Old Ways New Roads will take users on a journey around many of Scotland’s best-known locations, following in the footsteps of 18th-century travellers. Transferring what was originally conceived as a physical exhibition to an online format will allow The Hunterian to provide multiple layers of interpretations, that would be more difficult to achieve within the constraints of a traditional three-dimensional environment.

While introducing the research and stories that underpin the exhibition to a much broader audience, the online platform will also help to open up a dialogue with visitors and offer them a chance to undertake their own journey around Scotland, at a time when physical travelling is not possible.

Old Ways New Roads is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, edited by Anne Dulau Beveridge, John Bonehill and Nigel Leask.

The online exhibition will also feature a range of online events, planned for March-May 2021.

Old Ways New Roads Talk Series

Join us for the Old Ways New Roads Talk Series, held on Tuesdays at 1pm via Zoom. Talks will be 10-15 minutes long with time for questions afterwards. Zoom links will be made available below. 

16 February 
Anne Dulau Beveridge, Curator at The Hunterian, University of Glasgow
An Introduction to Old Ways New Roads

23 February 
John Bonehill, Lecturer in Art History, University of Glasgow 
Mapping the landscape: Paul Sandby's 'View near Loch Rannoch' 
Roy Military Survey of Scotland, 1747-1755 - National Library of Scotland (nls.uk)

2 March 
Mary-Ann Constantine, Reader at the University of Wales, Centre of Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies  
New Ways with Old Roads – towards digital editions of Pennant’s Tours of Wales and Scotland  

Join Zoom Meeting
https://uofglasgow.zoom.us/j/95834842629?pwd=WDNIK010eGltK0p2M0E5dlJlRjNrQT09

Meeting ID: 958 3484 2629
Passcode: 4545

9 March 
Hugh Cheape, Professor at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, University of the Highlands and Islands 
'There's another road near the Highway': the Ethnology of the 'Old Ways' in Gaelic Scotland

16 March 
Viccy Coltman, Professor of eighteenth-century History of Art, University of Edinburgh
Portable Knick-knacks or the Material Culture of Travel

23 March  
Christina Young, Professor of Conservation and Technical Art History, University of Glasgow 
Panoramas and Landscape

30 March 
Nigel Leask, Regius Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Glasgow
Elizabeth Diggle’s ‘Journal of a Tour from London to the Highlands of Scotland’ 

6 April
Christopher Dingwall, independent landscape historian, trustee and Vice Chairman of Scotland’s Garden and Landscape Heritage
Roads, Bridges and Designed Landscapes on the Highland Circuit

 

Old Ways New Roads Online Book Launch

The publication which accompanies the forthcoming online exhibition Old Ways New Roads: Travels in Scotland 1720-1832 is available to buy now. To celebrate, The Hunterian hosted an online book launch which you can watch here, featuring an introduction by Hunterian Director Steph Scholten, the publication editors Anne Dulau Beveridge, John Bonehill and Nigel Leask, a live discussion with the contributing authors and a live Q&A with the audience.

The publication, also titled Old Ways New Roads: Travels in Scotland 1720-1832, is published by independent Scottish publisher Birlinn Ltd. llustrated with over 200 artworks from public and private collections, the publication explores how from 1725 onwards, the Scottish landscape was variously documented, evaluated, planned and imagined in words and images. Providing a fascinating insight into the experience of travellers and tourists, it also considers how they impacted on the experience of the Scottish people themselves.

Old Ways New Roads Online Book Launch

Watch now!