Work on Demand: Contracting for Work in a Changing Economy

Work on Demand: Contracting for Work in a Changing Economy

Description

The Work on Demand (‘WorkOD’) project seeks to investigate the ever-evolving nature of contracts and contracting behaviour in the world of work – not only contracts of employment, but also those of casual, ‘zero-hours’, and self-employed workers. A particular point of focus is the emerging ‘gig’ or ‘on demand’ economy, in which consumers order a range of services, or delivery of a range of goods, online or via smart phone apps. The project has a strong comparative dimension, and will analyse differences in forms of contract and contracting behaviour across jurisdictions and over the course of several decades. A key innovation is the characterisation of contracting for work as an instance of economic, social and legal behaviour. With the aim of developing a new methodology for the study of work contracts, the project seeks to synthesise elements of economic sociology, sociology of law, and political economy into a new ‘economic sociology of labour law’. The relevance of this work will extend beyond the field of labour law into other legal disciplines and branches of social science.

The project is motivated by a normative and empirical concern with the continued viability of systems of labour law that are, broadly-speaking, protective of workers’ interests. It builds on previous research conducted by the Principal Investigator, Professor Ruth Dukes, into traditional and more recent market-based approaches to the study of labour law. It is funded by a European Research Council Starting Grant.

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply. Only full-time students are eligible.  Candidates must have a first, upper second class honours, and/or Master’s degree in a relevant discipline (eg Law, Sociology, Political Science). They should have a good knowledge of current trends and debates in the fields of labour law and the organization of working relationships. Knowledge of a second language is desirable.

For candidates whose first language is not English, we require IELTS 7.0 (with 6.5 in each component) or equivalent.   

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time commencing on 1 October 2018 and will provide:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate £14,764 full-time*)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
  • additional financial support for fieldwork and conference attendance

* NB £14,764 is the likely rate for 2018-19, as yet to be confirmed

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk by 28 February 2018:

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith Work on Demand Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Research Proposal

A brief 2-page document outlining the applicant’s proposed contribution to the research project.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited for interview in the second half of March 2018. All applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by 31 March 2018.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Multiple Hypothesis Testing in Finance - Acanto Research Studentship

Multiple Hypothesis Testing in Finance - Acanto Research Studentship

Description

In financial modelling, researchers aim to develop models that explain the behavior of financial time series and phenomena. They face two problems: first, they have to identify the set of variables that affect the series under study; second, they have to ensure that the proposed model is robust and the results can be generalized. In many occasions, the Quantitative Finance and Econometrics literature has been unable to offer sufficient or unambiguous tools to assist researchers, leading to a series of debates among finance academics and practitioners. For example, in asset pricing, several models have been presented (e.g., Single Index model, Fama-French three or five-factor models, etc.). What variables affect the asset returns and under what conditions? In financial trading, similar concerns apply. Does the Efficient Market Hypothesis hold? Does technical analysis have any value? Do statistical arbitrage techniques exist? Similar debates have risen in almost all aspects of finance and the literature has been filled with models with contradicting empirical evidence.

Based on the seminal work of White (2000), various tests have been developed aiming to investigate the robustness of competitive models and identify the appropriate drivers of a financial variable. Although the literature is new, there is a wealth of tests (see, amongst others, Hansen and Lunde, 2005; Hsu and Kuan, 2005; Romano et al., Hsu et al., 2010, Bajgrowicz and Scaillet, 2012). Early attempts in the field of technical analysis have already been conducted (Lo et al., 2000; Neely and Weller, 2013; Bajgrowicz and Scaillet, 2012), which, nevertheless, are restricted to simple trading and fundamental rules. Additionally, the aforementioned literature does not exploit the latest developments in bootstrapping or the latest Statistical methods in controlling the Family wise error rate and the false discovery ratio. 

The aim of the project is to develop new tests on multiple hypothesis that are flexible and efficient and to apply them in trading problems (such as trading and the Adaptive Market Hypothesis, volatility trading and its robustness or statistical arbitrage under different market conditions).

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply as well as students already in their first year of a University of Glasgow PhD. Full-time students are eligible. 

The successful applicant needs to have a good knowledge of Statistics (bootstrapping), programming and trading.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate estimated at £14,764 full-time/£8,858.40 part-time)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
  • a research support grant of £750 (£450 part-time) per annum
  • opportunity for an internship at Acanto Holding, Hannover, Germany
  • access to the Acanto Holding finance databases

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to georgios.sermpinis@glasgow.ac.uk by 23 April 2018.

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to georgios.sermpinis@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

 

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Fully-funded PhD scholarships in international economic history at the University of Glasgow (EURECON project funded by the European Research Council)

Fully-funded PhD scholarships in international economic history at the University of Glasgow (EURECON project funded by the European Research Council)

Applications are invited for one 3-year PhD scholarship in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow.

The successful candidate will be part of the ERC-funded project The Making of a Lopsided Union: Economic Integration in the European Economic Community, 1957-1992 (EURECON) led by Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (Grant Agreement n°716849). They are expected to begin on 1 October 2018.

Description of the EURECON project

The goal of EURECON is to explore European policymakers’ views about how to make the organisation of the European Economic Community (EEC) fit for the creation of a single currency, from 1957 to 1992. It is often said that the euro has faults of conception. But how did this happen? How was the euro made in such a way that it nearly completely overlooked some critical aspects of monetary unions? The assumption is that in the run-up to the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, European policymakers just did not think properly about how to make the Euro work. Was this really the case? Did European policymakers really overlook the economic foundations of European monetary union?

The project aims to examine European policymakers' debates and proposals, understand the reasons for their success or failure, identify the dynamics of political and economic trade-offs and compromises, shifting priorities, and alternative approaches that were abandoned at the time but recycled later. The project focuses on five work packages: macroeconomic policy coordination, fiscal transfers, capital market integration, banking harmonisation/supervision and the deepening of the common/single market. The project will examine the origins of the issues that are currently bedevilling the European Union (EU) by investigating the period between the creation of the EEC in 1957 and the decision to create a European single currency in 1992.

PhD position

The PhD project will focus on the role and influence of non-state, non-EEC actors and factors in the above discussions. Interested applicants should focus specifically on the role of one of the following actors/factor:

  • Big business (other than banks): The implementation of the common/single market, the issue of EEC fiscal transfers, and macroeconomic policy coordination had an impact on the conduct of business in Europe. Did big business consider that these developments would improve their environment, in creating more business opportunities, easier financing and trade? The Roundtable of Industrialists famously lobbied for the Single Market Project; did big business aim to actively support or oppose other developments at different time periods?
  • Trade unions: Macroeconomic policy coordination, EEC fiscal transfers, and the development of the common/single market had an important impact upon labour relations. How did trade unions try to influence European economic policymaking? In particular, how did they promote European social policies and how did they cope with the challenges induced by European economic integration in a globalising world? The rise of unemployment in Europe from the 1970s as well as the reflections mentioned above about the introduction of an EEC-wide unemployment benefit provided an important points of interest for trade unions.

The successful candidate is expected to:

-          Write a PhD thesis under the supervision of Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

-          Be an active part of the EURECON project and work in close cooperation with other team members

-          Present papers at conferences

-          Publish in international peer-reviewed journals (individual and co-authored)

-          Participate in yearly workshops organised within the scope of EURECON.

The successful candidate will register for a PhD in Economic and Social History, School of Social and Political Sciences, College of Social Sciences, University of Glasgow.

The scholarship covers the successful student’s full-time Home/EU tuition fees and stipend, both at RCUK levels, and includes a research budget allowance to cover expenses related to archival research and conference attendance (at least £1500 p.a.).

PhD students at the University of Glasgow benefit from the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School Research Training Programme, as well as an annual Thesis Review Committee and an annual Doctoral Retreat. PhD students may also have the opportunity to become Graduate Teaching Assistants and gain teaching experience.

Candidates must be fluent in English. A good command of another European language would be an advantage.

How to apply

Please include the following supporting documentation with your application:

-          Your CV

-          Your research proposal focusing on one of the actors/factors outlined above (max. 2500 words, including footnotes, references and bibliography)

-          Your degree transcripts

-          Your English language certificate

-          Two letters of reference

Interested candidates should apply on the University of Glasgow’s Online Application System http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/opportunities/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/#/. Applicants should put ‘EURECON’ in the ‘Research Title’ field in ‘Step 6 – Course Details’ of the application form, and select ‘PhD in Economic and Social History (Research)’.

Interested applicants are strongly advised to discuss their research proposal with Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (emmanuel.mourlon-druol@glasgow.ac.uk) before they apply.

Short-listed candidates may be invited for an interview in Glasgow.

Application deadline is 30 April 2018.