Postgraduate research funding

Postgraduate research funding

The following funded projects are currently accepting applications. Please refer to each project's adverts for full details and application processes.

AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair

AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair

Information on the University/Department

This is a collaborative PhD and the student will be supervised through both the Centre for Disability in the University of Glasgow’s School of Social and Political Sciences Research and the National Paralympic Heritage Trust.  The Centre for Disability research is a world leading research unit with a thriving research culture and a large number of postgraduate students.  They will be part of the University of Glasgow's College of Social Science Graduate School and will be able to take advantage of all the training and educational support provided through the College. The National Paralympic Heritage Trust was established in July 2015 to gather, protect and share British Paralympic Heritage and is a new and exciting contributor to the country’s sport heritage landscape. Their aim is to educate people regarding Britain’s founding role in the Paralympic movement and in doing so help them to understand the benefits of sport whatever your ability, become more aware of access requirements and, above all, change attitudes to disability in a positive manner.

The studentship will be jointly supervised by Professor Nick Watson at the University of Glasgow and Dr Vicky Hope-Walker of the National Paralympic Heritage Trust

The studentship is intended to support the work and development of the sporting heritage community in the UK.

Project details

Little is currently known about the history of wheelchairs in general or the role of disabled people in their development.  For millions of disabled people around the world the wheelchair has been one of the most important and significant technological innovations of the 20th Century.  This research will look at the development of one particular chair, the sport wheelchair and their influence on the evolution of wheelchairs and on disability politics, as the innovations developed for sport chairs transferred from the courts and tracks to become incorporated into the design, manufacture and use of everyday wheelchairs.

Previous work which has explored the development of wheelchair from either medicine or engineering portray wheelchair development in terms of scientific and technological progress and in doing this has tended to obscure the complex social and technical interactions which have underpinned their development.  The sports wheelchair emerged through the actions of wheelchair users and wheelchair athletes as they sought to improve their performance on the courts and the track.  The innovations and developments they sought to implement often ran counter to the wishes of wheelchair manufacturers, health care professionals and those who controlled wheelchair sports.  The emergence of the sport wheelchair marks a significant moment not just in the history of sport and disability but also in the history of disability and disability politics.  It is this intersection that this project aims to uncover.

In reconstructing the of the development of the sport wheelchair the project will bring together the history of science and technology, the history of Paralympic sport and the history of disability politics and activism.  It will, in particular, look at the role of disabled athletes in this story and their agency and actions both in developing new innovations and incorporating new technologies into the wheelchair and in challenging those who sought to resist this development.  What will make this account so powerful is that it is a success story for a group who have historically been excluded from design processes.

The project will draw on archival and documentary sources and on oral histories.  In reconstructing the history the student will interview wheelchair users, wheelchair athletes, wheelchair designers, representatives from wheelchair manufacturers, medical and health professionals and government officials and civil servants. These oral histories will be supplemented by an extensive search of archival resources of a range of relevant publications including publications by disability groups such as; Magic Carpet (the journal of the Invalid Tricycle Association, ITA), Paraplegia News (the journal of the Paralysed Veteran's of America, PVA) Sports'n’Spokes (a journal also published by the PVA focusing on wheelchair sports). They will also review technical-scientific publications, such as Paraplegia, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the British Journal of Biomedical Science.  Other archives will include the UK's Public Records Office and the National Register of Archives and the National Archives in the US

Eligibility

We encourage applications from students with the following qualifications and experience:

Qualifications:

  • A first class, Upper Second (or equivalent) undergraduate degree, preferably in a relevant subject
  • Applicants should also have a Masters-level degree that satisfies AHRC eligibility requirements for advanced research training, or equivalent professional/occupational experience.
  • We may accept relevant work experience in lieu of a Masters. 

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3.5 PhD programme. The additional 6 months supported by the funding will enable the student to undertake new development opportunities as part of their PhD programme.  

The programme will commence in October 2019. It includes

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate £15,009 Full-Time)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

The studentship can be held on a Full-Time or Part-Time basis. 

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the studentship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A 2 page statement outlining why you are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what you would bring to this project.

The statement should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_Watson_SSPS_AHRCCollaborative_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 17 June 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 20 June 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social & Political Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Professor Nick Watson (Nicholas.Watson@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

Information on the University/Department

Funded by the ESRC, the Urban Big Data Centre (UBDC) is one of three big data centres in the UK. The UBDC has been investigating the possibilities of using big data and other innovative data sources to inform the understanding of the private rented sector (PRS). This PhD would be the next step for UBDC’s housing research, moving from testing new data sets to using them, in conjunction with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) and the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence (CaCHE). The UBDC currently has four PhD students who are encouraged to participate actively in the centre’s research group, workgroup meetings and centre seminars. PhD students are expected to present their work at different stages at school level but also in the centre.

The University of Glasgow hosts the ESRC funded CaCHE project. CaCHE is a research centre, networking hub and what works initiative. It runs six PhDs across the UK and has a strong commitment to early career researchers including a housing studies PhD summer school and an early careers researcher network. CaCHe  runs events, including in partnership with the Housing Studies Association. and has provided post-doc jobs to five researchers (soon to be seven) and employs three knowledge exchange officers. CaCHE has recently identified the PRS as one of its priorities moving forward and has recently held its annual conference on the Scottish market rental reforms. A major component of its work across the housing sector is to promote the rigorous use of evidence analysis and evaluation in testing interventions such as the regulatory changes recently introduced in Scotland.

SPICe is responsible for providing robust independent information to the Members of the Scottish Parliament.  This PhD is part-funded by their academic engagement programme. SPICe will input to the PhD providing a supervisor with expertise in housing policy. The student will benefit from the input of an expert in housing policy who has a vital understanding of communication with MSPs and policy makers. The collaboration provides valuable opportunities to communicate the results directly to MSPs and policy makers.

Project details

The Private Rental Sector (PRS) has tripled in size in a 20-year period following a long decline for most of the 20th Century. Many countries in Europe have successful PRSs but these are highly regulated. In the UK the PRS has had little regulation since the late eighties and is viewed, by some commentators, as the least stable of all tenures.  In addition to the growth of the PRS, the nature of private renting has also changed. Younger people now stay longer in private renting, with some predicted to spend much of their adult life in the PRS (“Generation Rent”). The number of households with children living in the PRS has also grown.  

In Scotland, changes have been made to legislation on PRS tenancies through the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016. The Act has introduced a new tenancy with some limitations on rents and changes aimed at increasing security of tenure. The aim of this PhD is to examine whether changes to Scottish PRS legislation impacts on PRS supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants, by making comparison to England. The student will be expected to use data from a range of sources including repeated cross sectional UK surveys (e.g. Family Resource Survey, Annual Population Survey), longitudinal UK household surveys (Understanding Society) and big data sources (online rental advertisements database from the Urban Big Data Centre).

The PhD will be situated jointly in two of the UK's leading centres for housing and urban research, both based in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow . This will provide an unrivalled opportunity for training and development. The research will benefit from collaboration with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) who are part funding the PhD, and will also be represented on the supervisory team.  SPICe is the Scottish Parliament’s impartial research and information service.  As part of the collaboration, the successful candidate will be expected to spend some of their study time based in the SPICe offices in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. 

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of, housing studies and policy
  • Have a good grounding in quantitative methods and have some knowledge of regression modeling.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate £15,009 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

The 1+3 scholarship is for candidates with a first degree in social sciences or a related area but no Masters-level training. For these candidates, the studentship would also provide fees and stipend for the additional year to complete the MRes in Urban Research as preparation for undertaking the PhD.  

Additional information

In the UK, the private rental sector has more than trebled in the last 20 years (DCLG 2017; Scottish Government 2017). This regrowth of the sector has led to widespread calls for greater regulation of rents and protection of tenants. A UK Government white paper suggested that longer tenancy and greater protection from rogue landlords might be considered in England (DCLG 2017). While some see rent control as protecting tenants from unaffordable rents, others see it as a way of reducing welfare benefit bills (House of Commons Library 2017). However, critics, particularly from the economics sphere, argue that rent controls have negative outcomes. While some politicians on the left have argued for rent controls, there are not wide spread calls for their return, rather some have called for some means of limiting extreme changes when they are particularly high (JRF 2012; De Santos 2012). Housing policy is devolved to the Scottish Government. There has been some ‘tinkering’ with PRS legislation in both England and Scotland, including tenancy deposit schemes, and landlord registration (in Scotland). However, the recent Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 is the first move back, by the Scottish Government, to exert some limitations on rents and to offer greater security to tenants in Scotland. This PhD sets out to test if the current changes in Scotland have an impact in a number of areas of the PRS including supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants. The student will use a natural experiment approach using England as a control.

Candidates should have undertaken some initial training in statistics or quantitative research methods and, more importantly, be keen to develop their expertise in this area. The studentship provides an excellent opportunity to receive a training in advanced quantitative research skills, and in the exploitation of Big Data in particular – a relatively new and fast-growing field for researchers. The student will benefit from being associated with both the Urban Big Data Centre, the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence and the Scottish Parliament Information Centre. This collaboration will allow the student to draw on a supervisory team with a large breadth of skills but will also provide significant opportunities to promote the research and findings.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest and check their eligibility by completing the Supervisor Led Awards ESRC Eligibility Checker 19/20

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate)
  • References
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A two or three page statement of interest detailing the following:
    • Your interest in the topic of the project
    • Issues you think are involved
    • An approach to studying these using national surveys and administrative date (from online advertisers)
    • Your long-term career goals

The statement of interest should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_GibbGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 30 June 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and interview will take place are on 19 July 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Mark Livingston (Mark.Livingston@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ERC PhD Studentship - GLOBALMUN: Global Remunicipalisation and the Post-Neoliberal Turn

ERC PhD Studentship - GLOBALMUN: Global Remunicipalisation and the Post-Neoliberal Turn

Information on the University/Department

The PhD studentships will be located in the Political Economy section of the EDPE Research Cluster (https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/centres/entrepreneurship/) in the Adam Smith Business school, which is convened by Professor Andrew Cumbers. The cluster brings together a number of researchers whose research is concerned with the key processes and actors involved in shaping economic development at local, national and global levels. The cluster combines research interests concerned with local and regional economic development and governance (including work on cities); entrepreneurship research; and alternative economic development practices. The work of the cluster combines contemporary research issues with longer-term perspectives on economic development, using heterodox political economy approaches and incorporating evolutionary and historical approaches.

Project details

3 fully funded (3 year) PhD studentships are available to conduct case study research into the global remunicipalisation phenomenon: an accelerating trend since 2000 for cities and towns to take back public assets and services from formerly privatised enterprises. The studentships are part of a broader European Research Council Advanced Grant - GLOBALMUN: Global Remunicipalisation and the Post-Neoliberal Turn - awarded to Professor Andrew Cumbers of the University of Glasgow’s Adam Smith Business School (ASBS). The research advances the thesis that remunicipalisation represents a critical moment in the demise of neoliberalism, signifying a shift towards a new post-neoliberal urban governance regime. This has fundamental implications for cities in terms of how they are managed, who is involved and who benefits from urban development processes, with the re-introduction of more state-driven and potentially more democratic public forms.

The studentships will be located in the management subject area within the College of Social Sciences, under the supervision of Professor Andrew Cumbers. Each studentship will be based at the University of Glasgow, undertaking fieldwork in one of the project’s case study countries; Argentina, Germany and the United States; and will involve detailed ethnographic research of individual cases of remunicipalisation. The successful candidates will be part of the broader project team, including the PI, co-investigators, two postdoctoral research fellows and non-academic partners.

The supervision arrangements are as follows:

Argentina-based studentship: Professor Andrew Cumbers + Dr Mo Hume (School of Social and Political Sciences)

German-based studentship: Professor Andrew Cumbers + Dr David Featherstone (School of Geographical and Earth Sciences)

US-based studentship: Professor Andrew Cumbers + Professor Robert McMaster (ASBS)

Eligibility

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component;
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of, urban political economy;
  • A Master’s degree completed (before starting the PhD) in a relevant social science at merit level or equivalent;
  • Research methods training, including completion of specialist qualitative methods module at postgraduate level;
  • Completion to a high standard (2:1 or merit at postgraduate) of a qualitative-based research dissertation or equivalent experience;
  • Relevant fieldwork experience would be considered an advantage;
  • For the German-sited studentship, applicants should have a good working knowledge (preferably fluent) of German;
  • For the Argentina-sited studentship, applicants should be fluent in Spanish.

Award details

The studentships are available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only). The programme will commence in January 2020.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate £15,009 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate.
  • Students can also draw on a Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'ERC PhD Studentship - GLOBALMUN'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the CoSS scholarship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • Research Proposal along the themes of the project defined above
  • Cover letter detailing the following:
    1. Your research interests.
    2. A detailed course description of your Master's research training
    3. Details of any other relevant training and skills you have.
    4. Your long-term career goals.
    5. short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_Cumbers_ASBS_ERCPhDStudentship_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 29 July 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 07 August. Interviews will take place between 14 and 23 August 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

For further enquiries, please contact Professor Andrew Cumbers: +44 141 330 2291 or Andrew.Cumbers@glasgow.ac.uk