Postgraduate research funding

Postgraduate research funding

The following funded projects are currently accepting applications. Please refer to each project's adverts for full details and application processes.

ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Young people's lived experiences of welfare conditionality over time

ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Young people's lived experiences of welfare conditionality over time

Information on the University/Department

The PhD will be based within a thriving research environment in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow, which is the UK’s leading urban research unit, within the interdisciplinary environment of School of Social and Political Sciences.  The project will be affiliated with the ‘Neighbourhoods, Welfare and Wellbeing’ Research Group at Urban Studies (which consists of researchers at all levels) and the candidate will work alongside doctoral candidates investigating similar topics, e.g. Universal Credit, welfare conditionality for disabled people etc.  Youth inequalities are a central concern of the wider School of Social and Political Sciences, forming a core contribution to the University research beacon on Inequality. 

Project details

This PhD is designed to re-analyse the 'Welfare Conditionality' Qualitative Longitudinal Research data set to establish original knowledge about how conditionality impacts on young people's lived experiences of claiming benefits and looking for work in Scotland and England. 

Welfare conditionality has been at the heart of a fundamental and controversial transformation of the British welfare system.  In contrast to traditional rights-based social security, conditionality aims to stimulate job entries by requiring intensive job-seeking behaviour, backed by one of the toughest sanctions regimes in the world (e.g. removing benefits for up to three years).  The on-going roll out of Universal Credit extends conditionality to in-work claimants, disabled people, carers, lone parents with pre-school children, and claimants' partners. 

Recent research suggests that young people aged 18-24 are disproportionately affected by these reforms because they are at twice the risk of unemployment (compared with those aged 25-64) and face the highest risks of benefit sanctions.  Young people are also multiply disadvantaged, with reduced social security entitlements than older citizens; lower earnings potential (lower national living wages); and confronted with barriers to establish housing and financial independence due to increasingly precarious work conditions and housing insecurity. Growing numbers of young people have hence become economically marginalised within a context of growing precarity in an unequal, insecure labour market characterised by underemployment and in-work poverty. However, little is currently known about how young people growing up in this context experience the policies that intensify conditionality and limit welfare support, which hold potentially harmful and long-lasting impacts. This doctoral project is designed to contribute new knowledge on how young people experience and are impacted by conditionality over time and whether conditionality is effective or ethical for them.

The candidate will work at the forefront of methodological innovation and learn and apply advanced large-scale qualitative data analysis techniques, including QSR NVivo framework matrix analysis, during the project.  The core objective is to work with secondary datasets and reanalyse the Welfare Conditionality youth data and, additionally, to potentially re-contact a group of the original participants for re-interview.

The outcome of the research will be new findings about the long-term impacts of welfare conditionality on young people and a set of policy and practice recommendations to address these in Scotland, UK and international levels.    

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/ 

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • Demonstrate an interest in and knowledge of youth studies, youth transitions, social security, welfare conditionality, and social/public policy.
  • Have a good grounding in qualitative research methods.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A one or two page (A4) statement of interest detailing the following:
    • Your interest in the topic of the project
    • Relevant experience and knowledge of the topic and/or methods
    • Issues (and difficulties) you think are involved to conduct the research
    • Your career goals

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_WrightGlasgowDataSets_date*

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 05 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 1 May 2019. Interviews dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within University of Glasgow.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Dr Sharon Wright (Sharon.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk)


ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Does Prison Kill? Using linked datasets to examine relationships between imprisonment, inequality and mortality

ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Does Prison Kill? Using linked datasets to examine relationship between imprisonment, inequality and mortality

Information on the University/Department

The student would be registered in the Sociology Subject that is part of the College of Social Sciences at the University of Glasgow. The successful applicant also would become part of the 60-strong PhD community within the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR), a four university partnership between Glasgow, Edinburgh, Stirling and Strathclyde Universities; and this project involves cross supervision between the lead supervisor (Sarah Armstrong) based at Glasgow University and the second supervisor (Susan McVie) based at Edinburgh University. Glasgow University, its College of Social Sciences and both Sociology at Glasgow and SCCJR offer a range of development training and opportunities including PhD workshops, conferences and student-led initiatives.

Project details

People who have been to prison die earlier from all causes than those who have not, and the reasons for this are not well understood. Ex-prisoners have higher mortality rates for causes of death due to suicide, homicide, accidental overdose, as well as higher all-cause mortality levels. Research to date has focused on the poor health and complex needs and issues of many people prior to or following time in prison, and only recently have researchers begun to set these issues in a wider context of deprivation and inequality and to consider the health effects of prison. This project will link a range of Scottish datasets including mortality, prison experience, health, education and neighbourhood to explore relationships between health, deprivation and imprisonment. The aggregate picture revealed in the data linkage project will allow for analyses that can enrich understanding of the interactions of imprisonment, mortality and inequality. Overall, the project aims to identify how particular contextual factors, such as living in poverty, poor housing conditions, lack of educational attainment, and poor health circumstances interact to produce the material consequences that result in a person ending up in prison; and secondly, to document how the nature and length of imprisonment impacts on risk of mortality and other health outcomes. A specific contribution of this research is in relating the analysis to an understanding of imprisonment as an aspect of inequality and social exclusion that can have lethal effects for individuals. This project thereby would significantly contribute to our understanding of the nature and profound effects of inequality in the prisoner journey and enable policy makers and practitioners to more effectively respond to these challenges and prevent early deaths.

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/ 

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and some knowledge of imprisonment issues including those relating to health and wellbeing
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and potential aptitude for, analyzing and linking data related to health, criminal history, neighbourhood, census data and imprisonment

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019. The scholarship can be held on a full-time or part-time basis and includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate estimated to be £14,999 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub:

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_ArmstrongGlasgowDataSets_date*

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 19 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 03 May 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Dr Sarah Armstrong (Sarah.Armstrong@glasgow.ac.uk)


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Connecting communities: transformative impacts of community garden networks

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Connecting communities: transformative impacts of community garden networks

Information on the University/Department

The studentship will be embedded within the Management subject group of the Adam Smith Business School at the University of Glasgow. Our postgraduate research training programme combines robust taught research training and applied research practice within a flexible timeframe of three to five years. Beginning with foundation training in research methods, you will follow advanced training pathways in qualitative and quantitative methodologies and benefit from extensive training in research skills. As a postgraduate, you will form the bedrock of our research community, and we will actively encourage you to publish your research and participate in research seminars, training retreats, workshops, conferences and presentations. 

Project details

A wealth of research highlights the benefit of community gardens to urban health and well-being (Draper and Freedmanm 2010), social inclusion (Crossan et al., 2016), and food security (Garett and Leeds, 2015). Urban populations continue to experience multiple deprivation that is linked to spatial vulnerability and limited access to green space. The prevalence of derelict land (SMID, 2016), privatisation of public space (Smith, 2018), and the prioritisation of property-based regeneration (Shaw et al., 2018) that are common characteristics of deprived communities all serve to intensify spatial inequality.  

We aim to examine transformative impacts of community garden networks and conceptualise mechanisms through which community-led gardens can empower communities to transform local food economies. In doing so, this research addresses calls for research on spatial vulnerability (Saatcioglu and Corus, 2016) that acknowledges the ways that consumer disadvantage can intensify due to geographical location. This resonates with our context and collaboration partner, Baltic Street Adventure Playground (BSAP), a third sector organisation that facilitates access to community green space in Dalmarnock – a community which belongs to 5% of the most deprived areas of Glasgow (SIMD, 2016).

Existing research identifies the positive outcomes of community gardens at the individual and community level. Limited research has examined the transformative impacts of these spaces to facilitate network building and social interaction across diverse groups within more deprived neighbourhoods.  This research examines how multiple growing spaces can connect to create transformative networks of food provision for spatially vulnerable communities. It develops a network approach to engage with key third sector organisations, community groups and consumers to generate critical insights into the transformative potential of community garden networks. This research will work towards building impact for communities by developing insights to support the practical development of community governed growing spaces, which may help tackle food inequality for low-income communities.  

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/ 

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

For 1+3

  • A 2:1 degree or equivalent preferably with a business and management component
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of community empowerment and food/environmental sustainability debates
  • Have a good grounding in community empowerment and food/sustainability issues

For +3

  • • A master’s good degree preferably with a business and management component
  • • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of community empowerment and food/environmental sustainability debates
  • • Have a good grounding in community empowerment and food/sustainability issues.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub:

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_CumbersGlasgowCollaborative_date*

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 19 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 03 May 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Professor Andrew Cumbers (Andrew.Cumbers@glasgow.ac.uk)


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

Information on the University/Department

Funded by the ESRC, the Urban Big Data Centre (UBDC) is one of three big data centres in the UK. The UBDC has been investigating the possibilities of using big data and other innovative data sources to inform the understanding of the private rented sector (PRS). This PhD would be the next step for UBDC’s housing research, moving from testing new data sets to using them, in conjunction with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) and the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence (CaCHE). The UBDC currently has four PhD students who are encouraged to participate actively in the centre’s research group, workgroup meetings and centre seminars. PhD students are expected to present their work at different stages at school level but also in the centre.

The University of Glasgow hosts the ESRC funded CaCHE project. CaCHE is a research centre, networking hub and what works initiative. It runs six PhDs across the UK and has a strong commitment to early career researchers including a housing studies PhD summer school and an early careers researcher network. CaCHe  runs events, including in partnership with the Housing Studies Association. and has provided post-doc jobs to five researchers (soon to be seven) and employs three knowledge exchange officers. CaCHE has recently identified the PRS as one of its priorities moving forward and has recently held its annual conference on the Scottish market rental reforms. A major component of its work across the housing sector is to promote the rigorous use of evidence analysis and evaluation in testing interventions such as the regulatory changes recently introduced in Scotland.

SPICe is responsible for providing robust independent information to the Members of the Scottish Parliament.  This PhD is part-funded by their academic engagement programme. SPICe will input to the PhD providing a supervisor with expertise in housing policy. The student will benefit from the input of an expert in housing policy who has a vital understanding of communication with MSPs and policy makers. The collaboration provides valuable opportunities to communicate the results directly to MSPs and policy makers.

Project details

The Private Rental Sector (PRS) has tripled in size in a 20-year period following a long decline for most of the 20th Century. Many countries in Europe have successful PRSs but these are highly regulated. In the UK the PRS has had little regulation since the late eighties and is viewed, by some commentators, as the least stable of all tenures.  In addition to the growth of the PRS, the nature of private renting has also changed. Younger people now stay longer in private renting, with some predicted to spend much of their adult life in the PRS (“Generation Rent”). The number of households with children living in the PRS has also grown.  

In Scotland, changes have been made to legislation on PRS tenancies through the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016. The Act has introduced a new tenancy with some limitations on rents and changes aimed at increasing security of tenure. The aim of this PhD is to examine whether changes to Scottish PRS legislation impacts on PRS supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants, by making comparison to England. The student will be expected to use data from a range of sources including repeated cross sectional UK surveys (e.g. Family Resource Survey, Annual Population Survey), longitudinal UK household surveys (Understanding Society) and big data sources (online rental advertisements database from the Urban Big Data Centre).

The PhD will be situated jointly in two of the UK's leading centres for housing and urban research, both based in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow . This will provide an unrivalled opportunity for training and development. The research will benefit from collaboration with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) who are part funding the PhD, and will also be represented on the supervisory team.  SPICe is the Scottish Parliament’s impartial research and information service.  As part of the collaboration, the successful candidate will be expected to spend some of their study time based in the SPICe offices in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. 

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of, housing studies and policy
  • Have a good grounding in quantitative methods and have some knowledge of regression modeling.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

The 1+3 scholarship is for candidates with a first degree in social sciences or a related area but no Masters-level training. For these candidates, the studentship would also provide fees and stipend for the additional year to complete the MRes in Urban Research as preparation for undertaking the PhD.  

Additional information

In the UK, the private rental sector has more than trebled in the last 20 years (DCLG 2017; Scottish Government 2017). This regrowth of the sector has led to widespread calls for greater regulation of rents and protection of tenants. A UK Government white paper suggested that longer tenancy and greater protection from rogue landlords might be considered in England (DCLG 2017). While some see rent control as protecting tenants from unaffordable rents, others see it as a way of reducing welfare benefit bills (House of Commons Library 2017). However, critics, particularly from the economics sphere, argue that rent controls have negative outcomes. While some politicians on the left have argued for rent controls, there are not wide spread calls for their return, rather some have called for some means of limiting extreme changes when they are particularly high (JRF 2012; De Santos 2012). Housing policy is devolved to the Scottish Government. There has been some ‘tinkering’ with PRS legislation in both England and Scotland, including tenancy deposit schemes, and landlord registration (in Scotland). However, the recent Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 is the first move back, by the Scottish Government, to exert some limitations on rents and to offer greater security to tenants in Scotland. This PhD sets out to test if the current changes in Scotland have an impact in a number of areas of the PRS including supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants. The student will use a natural experiment approach using England as a control.

Candidates should have undertaken some initial training in statistics or quantitative research methods and, more importantly, be keen to develop their expertise in this area. The studentship provides an excellent opportunity to receive a training in advanced quantitative research skills, and in the exploitation of Big Data in particular – a relatively new and fast-growing field for researchers. The student will benefit from being associated with both the Urban Big Data Centre, the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence and the Scottish Parliament Information Centre. This collaboration will allow the student to draw on a supervisory team with a large breadth of skills but will also provide significant opportunities to promote the research and findings.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate)
  • References
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A two or three page statement of interest detailing the following:
    • Your interest in the topic of the project
    • Issues you think are involved
    • An approach to studying these using national surveys and administrative date (from online advertisers)
    • Your long-term career goals

The statement of interest should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_GibbGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 19 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 03 May 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Mark Livingston (Mark.Livingston@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ESRC SDS-Collaborative Studentship - Entrepreneurialism in Work (EiW): Its forms, requisite skills and enabling organisational factors

ESRC SDS-Collaborative Studentship - Entrepreneurialism in Work (EiW): Its forms, requisite skills and enabling organisational factors

Information on the University/Department

The University of Glasgow, established in 1451, is in the prestigious Russell Group of research intensive institutions and is the fourth oldest University in the United Kingdom. The University combines over five centuries of history with a contemporary focus on world changing research. The University, and the Adam Smith Business School, changes the world through engaging with policy and practice and stimulating economic impact through entrepreneurship and innovation. This scholarship perfectly represents these principles.

The successful applicant will work in the Subject (Department) of Management in the Adam Smith Business School within the College of Social Sciences. The Subject of Management provides a vibrant intellectual and social environment for PhD students, with over 75 currently registered. The latest REF exercise (2014) rated 95% of the Adam Smith Business School’s staff outputs as internationally recognised, and 67% as internationally excellent or world leading. Within Management there are six specialist Research Clusters within which PhD students are located. This project will be supervised by academics in the Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour (HROB) and Entrepreneurship, Development and Political Economy (EDPE) clusters. The Clusters provide an environment for collegial discussion and support, for example providing feedback on PhD students’ presentations and draft papers. Cluster members also welcome engagement with others’ PhD students, giving access to leading expertise beyond the immediate supervisors. The clusters organise regular research seminars, bringing in high profile external speakers. Relevant opportunities and events throughout the College of Social Sciences will also be available for the successful applicant, e.g. in the School of Education.

The Adam Smith Business School and Subject of Management are dedicated to developing their PhD researchers. At the outset of their studies, and then annually, students complete a training needs assessment to ensure they receive the training they require. Formal research methods training courses are offered through the Subject, School and the College of Social Sciences. Students also have access to a wide range of initiatives, resources and courses designed to support their research skills and professional development, from within and outwith the School and Subject. These activities are designed to complement core research methods training and ensure continuous skill development throughout the PhD. The School also offers an annual doctoral retreat with expert speakers and workshops, and a first year PhD study day.

The Subject and School also organise dedicated PHD social events, for example an annual Christmas dinner and a meal following students’ annual review presentations to their Clusters.

For more information on the Adam Smith Business School and its research please see https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/

For more information on the Subject of Management please see https://www.gla.ac.uk/subjects/management/

Project details

Entrepreneurialism is increasingly viewed as essential within existing organisations as well as for founding new ventures. It is possible to identify and develop the kinds of skills that are necessary for behaving entrepreneurially. However, simply focusing on individuals’ skills and abilities is insufficient, and attention is needed as to the kinds of organisational factors (such as structure, leadership and culture) which may enable EiW to flourish. This is particularly germane given evidence (e.g. in the Skills and Employment Survey) that the kinds of organisational and work arrangements which might stimulate EiW are not the norm in the UK and may even be in decline. There is, however, a timely but relatively recent policy focus in Scotland to stimulate innovative forms of work. This makes Scotland an ideal location for investigating EiW and how organisations may promote it.

A qualitative multi-case study approach is proposed, purposively sampling different kinds of organisations in Scotland pursuing EiW. We propose the student will sample established organisations across different sectors, as well as one or more new entrepreneurial ‘start up’ companies. Access to appropriate organisations will be enabled through the supervisors’ existing networks and through contacts built by the successful applicant. The final decision on research approach and design will rest with the applicant but must include a qualitative element.

Knowledge exchange and impact activities will be foregrounded throughout, for example through collaboration with Skills Development Scotland and the case study organisations. This will include, for example, the production and dissemination of ‘good practice' reports, and a short video. 

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must also meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree* (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component.
  • For a +3 award (see below) applicants must additionally have: a) A Master’s degree at merit or distinction level* with a substantial component allied to business, management or related areas; and b) The equivalent of 60 credits research methods training at Master’s level.
  • A demonstrable interest in, and knowledge of, organisations, work and entrepreneurship.
  • A good grounding in social science research methods, economic and management issues.

 * If degree results are not known at the time of application, we can take the application forward based upon grades achieved on the degree so far. Results will need to be confirmed prior to commencing the programme.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A cover letter detailing the following:
    • Your research interests
    • A detailed course description of your Master's research training (where applying for the +3 award)
    • Details of any other relevant training and skills you have
    • Your long-term career goals
    • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_HurrellGordonGlasgowSDS_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 19 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 03 May 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For further information on the application process and eligibility criteria please contact William Shirriffs (William.Shirriffs@glasgow.ac.uk

For other information (e.g. on the project itself, please contact Scott Hurrell (Scott.Hurrell@glasgow.ac.uk) or Jillian Gordon (Jillian.Gordon@glasgow.ac.uk


CoSS PhD Scholarship - A quantifiable model of a Global Basic Income and Cash Transfer Programmes

CoSS PhD Scholarship - A quantifiable model of a Global Basic Income and Cash Transfer Programmes

Information on the School/Research Group

The Microeconomics Research Cluster focuses on the behaviour of individuals and on institutions allocating scarce resources. Microeconomists at the Adam Smith Business School studies market failures arising from asymmetric information, default and miscoordination of expectations, as well as non traditional markets like electronic commerce, or markets without money, such as reputation systems on the internet and the assignment of students to schools. They examine the normative foundations of decision making under uncertainty and behavioural biases together with related empirical paradoxes. They apply this methodology to the empirical analysis of oligopolistic markets, of behavioural poverty traps, disease prevalence, crime, copyright, and more.

Our PhD programmes are aimed at those who wish to become experts in a specialised field. A PhD is increasingly necessary for a successful academic career, but is also becoming an important distinguishing qualification for those who aspire to top positions in business, politics, and the media.

We provide research students with challenging and high quality training. As a research graduate, you will be equipped to design and conduct high-quality research and you will be prepared for employment where excellent analytic and communication skills are valued.

Project details

The use of cash transfer schemes (CTPs) as a tool for addressing poverty, inequality as well as other socially desirable behavioural, educational, health, intergenerational, environmental outcomes has become increasingly widespread in practice and prominent in policy debates in LMICs (as well as in OECD countries). For example, CTPs have been used as a component of the Tanzania Social Action Fund and a Senior Citizens’ Grant in Uganda with similar schemes in Kenya and Malawi as well as the Bolsa Familia in Brazil and elsewhere in Latin America, such as in Mexico, Colombia, Ecuador, and Chile; the latest Economic Survey 2016-17 by the Govt. of India has an entire chapter on the potential merits/drawbacks of introducing a universal basic income (BI) to combat poverty while DFID support the ongoing Benazir Income Support Programme in Pakistan.

CTPs are implemented in settings where lifetime incomes are low and uncertain, psychological factors (aspirations, beliefs, agency, attitudes) in decision-making, cultural expectations and market failures lead to adverse education, health, gender and other economic/social outcomes. Existing CTPs tend to be conditional, time limited and can be discontinued as donor and policy-maker funding priorities change. Economic theory suggests that the exact nature of conditionality and the time limits in a CTP, the choice of the target population, the presence (or absence) of complementary psychological training interventions and public investment in infrastructure, will all matter in determining their impact.

A number of researchers have looked at the impact of CTPs and BI on various outcomes relevant to the achievement of CTPs. A recent ODI DFID commissioned report (Bastagli et. al. 2016) on cash transfer schemes highlights a number of gaps in the empirical understanding of impact of conditional cash transfer schemes such as “the role of frequency and timing of payments, type or nature of conditionality … the longevity of impacts in the years after households stop receiving transfers”.

Building on existing empirical work, this project will develop dynamic, mathematical models grounded economic theory and behavioral economics, to examine the channels through which CTPs, including BI, operate on human welfare. The project will study the sustainability of CTPs, including a lifetime global basic income (GBI), to investigate whether a lifetime GBI can be self-financing (i.e. whether World GDP increases by more than x%- the initial cost of implementation - over time). Using insights from behavioral economics and decision-making under uncertainty, we will model the impact of different types of CTPs (including a lifetime BI) on individual decision-making. We will, then, embed behavioral decision-making by agents in social networks and other interactive settings that allow for capital, physical infrastructure, educational/health externalities and intergenerational effects (e.g. overlapping generation models). We will model the impact of different types of GBI and other CTPs under different circumstances combining both micro-, and macro-economic simulation, calibrating key model parameters using existing data. We will quantify the opportunity costs and welfare impacts/trade-offs of a GBI compared to other CTPs in the medium to long term, including impacts on inequalities. We will quantify the welfare impact of a GBI on individuals and their children but also on society and the economy as a whole in the medium to long term. We will examine the conditions under which a GBI, if implemented globally, will become self-financing over time (i.e. add to global GDP more than its initial cost). 

Eligibility

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component.
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of formal modelling skills and a research interest in development economics.
  • Have a good grounding in microeconomics and development economics.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year '+3' (PhD only). The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • A stipend indexed to the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate estimated at £14,999 Full-Time).
  • 100% Tuition Fee Waiver at the standard Home/EU or International rate.
  • Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) of up to £2,250 over 3 years (usually up to a maximum of £750 per year).

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'CoSS PhD Scholarship - A quantifiable model of a Global Basic Income and Cash Transfer Programmes'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the CoSS scholarship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • Cover letter detailing the following:
    1. Your research interests.
    2. A detailed course description of your Master's research training
    3. Details of any other relevant training and skills you have.
    4. Your long-term career goals.
    5. A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_Ghosal_ASBS_CoSSPhDScholarship_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 30 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and, if shortlisted, may be asked to attend an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business school. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Professor Sayantan Ghosal (Sayantan.Ghosal@glasgow.ac.uk) or Dr Theodore Koutmeridis (Theodore.Koutmeridis@glasgow.ac.uk


CoSS PhD Scholarship - Cryptocurrencies and Financial Crime Compliance: opportunities for new regulatory paradigms?

CoSS PhD Scholarship - Cryptocurrencies and Financial Crime Compliance: opportunities for new regulatory paradigms?

Project details

Cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin have now been in existence for over a decade and have prompted a significant movement in technological innovation and investment, and exploration into potential uses of Distributed Ledger Technology. As a market, the global capitalisation for cryptocurrencies reached almost a trillion US dollars at its peak in 2017, and has attracted a range of users such as retail and institutional investors, speculators and entrepreneurs, but also, quite understandably, criminals. Europol estimated in 2018 that criminals in Europe laundered over $5.5 billion through cryptocurrencies, and that the figure was growing.

The response to this threat by states and international organisations has been slow, but has gathered pace in the last couple of years. The EU, through its latest Anti-Money Laundering Directive 2018, (AMLD5), has sought to mitigate the risks of money laundering and terrorist financing by bringing cryptocurrency custodian wallet services and cryptocurrency exchange services within the scope of the anti-money laundering regime. This has been supported by the EBA, and the FATF, who have recently (October 2018) suggested even further widening the applicability of the AML regime to other entities involved in cryptocurrencies and related services. This regulatory turn assumes that the movement of cryptocurrencies can be policed and regulated in the same way as movements of traditional fiat currency. This may well be a flawed starting point for addressing the threats posed by cryptocurrencies in criminal markets and financial crime. Already, the AML regime is in crisis: it involves policing a massive number of databases which can be jurisdictionally complex; it is administratively burdensome and hugely costly for regulated entities; and, ultimately, it is widely regarded as wholly ineffective in identifying and stemming flows of illicit activities. Cryptocurrencies add a whole other layer of complexity for investigators, as high degrees of privacy and untraceability can be built into specific ‘coins’ (e.g. ZEC and Monero) or protocols (e.g. Zether), and where decentralised exchanges and peer-to-peer marketplaces are growing, and increasingly beyond the reach of criminal enforcement and regulation.

On the other hand, the technology behind cryptocurrencies could potentially be harnessed to offer different regulatory approaches, and a novel shift from ex-ante to ex-post compliance obligations. Cryptocurrency transactions on a publicly accessible global ledger, offer a pseudonymous system of value transfer, but could also provide high degrees of traceability and facilitate the seizure of suspicious transactions, if this was built into the underlying protocols. Rather than the current ex-ante AML paradigm, pseudonymous transactions would be tolerated but within a regime which would allow for the global search and analysis of specific regulated databases, where investigating authorities could compel actions by coin issuers in relation to dubious transactions and wallet addresses. 

The purpose of this project would therefore be to explore: 1) the nature of cryptocurrencies in property, monetary, and criminal law theory 2) the suitability of the extant AML regulatory regime for this novel technological development 3) whether the underlying blockchain architectures could offer alternative regulatory approaches for policing and preventing criminality involving cryptocurrencies 4) the potential value and benefits of such alternative approaches for law enforcement, and the costs and compromises that would inhere in such a system 5) whether such an alternative approach could carry lessons and utility for the broader AML regime.

Eligibility

Home/EU and International applicants are eligible to apply.

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) degree in Law or a Master's qualification in Law or equivalent is required.

Preference will be accorded to applicants who demonstrate proficiency in criminal law and/or financial crime compliance law and theory, and have a basic technical understanding of blockchain and distributed ledger technologies.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only). The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • A stipend indexed to the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate estimated at £14,999 Full-Time).
  • 100% Tuition Fee Waiver at the standard Home/EU or International rate.
  • Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) of up to £2,250 over 3 years (usually up to a maximum of £750 per year).

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'CoSS PhD Scholarship - Cryptocurrencies and Financial Crime Compliance'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s): Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents) 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional). At least one reference must be academic; the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee. If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account. In this case, your referee should send the reference to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the CoSS scholarship title to which you are applying.
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • Applicant statementA 1-2 page document outlining your skills and experience and why you would be equipped to undertake this research

Any applications which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

Closing Date: 30 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by the Project Team and shortlisted applicants may be invited to an interview, which would take place by the 23 May 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Law. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding

Key contact

Dr Micheál O’Flynn (Micheal.OFlynn@glasgow.ac.uk)


CoSS PhD Scholarship - Measuring the social life of the city

CoSS PhD Scholarship - Measuring the social life of the city

Information on the School/Research Group

This PhD is advertised by Urban Studies, one of the UK’s leading hubs for research on planning, housing and the built environment. Researchers working at the Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence and the Urban Big Data Centre, two major RCUK investments located within Urban Studies, will supervise this doctoral project. The project will also sit alongside an ESRC-funded research project on retail innovation and the high street, Real Estate, Place Adaptation & Innovation within an integrated Retailing system (REPAIR).

Project details

Research indicates that attractive places which are easily navigated by pedestrians, and where buildings and public spaces sit together harmoniously, support economic development, foster social interaction, and improve people’s health and well-being. The Avenues Project in the Scottish city of Glasgow is a £115 million investment that aims to make “the city more attractive, "people-friendly", and economically competitive” through major improvements to infrastructure that will increase pedestrian/cycle space, improve lighting, reduce street clutter, and introduce trees on city centre streets. The PhD research will focus on the implementation and impact of this project.

Robust evaluation and measurement of such public realm interventions is currently limited due to a lack of available data and methods. Recent advances in Big Data offer new opportunities to conduct research on new infrastructure in an innovative way alongside traditional qualitative research methods. The PhD will therefore adopt a mixed methods approach to develop an evidence base that identifies whether such investments enhance the social life of the city.

It is anticipated that the research will lead to an empirically-driven understanding of the impact that major public realm investments have on the social life of cities. In so doing, the studentship will reveal new information on the behaviours of pedestrians and cyclists informing not only the future phases of Glasgow’s Avenues Project but also wider discourses in the literature on transformative public space in the city.

Eligibility

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component.
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of urban planning and design, sustainable transportation, and the geography of the city.
  • Have a good grounding in qualitative and quantitative data collection tools and analysis.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only). The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • A stipend indexed to the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate estimated at £14,999 Full-Time).
  • 100% Tuition Fee Waiver at the standard Home/EU or International rate.
  • Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) of up to £2,250 over 3 years (usually up to a maximum of £750 per year).

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'CoSS PhD Scholarship - Measuring the social life of the city'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the CoSS scholarship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • Cover letter detailing the following:
    1. Your research interests.
    2. A detailed course description of your Master's research training
    3. Details of any other relevant training and skills you have.
    4. Your long-term career goals.
    5. A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_White_SSPS_CoSSPhDScholarship_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 30 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by Friday 3rd May 2019. Interviews will take place on/by Friday 8th May 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Dr James White (JamesT.White@glasgow.ac.uk)


CoSS PhD Scholarship - Tackling poverty through "inclusive finance"- a case study of a Chinese rural village

CoSS PhD Scholarship - Tackling poverty through "inclusive finance"- a case study of a Chinese rural village

Project details

The promotion of “financial inclusion” as an approach to poverty alleviation, was recently officially proposed by the Chinese government, with the intention of facilitating access to affordable and safe financial services for low-income citizens and small businesses excluded from mainstream banking (“Decision of the CCCPC on Some Major Issues Concerning Comprehensively Deepening the Reform”, 2013, available at: http://www.china.org.cn/chinese/2014-01/16/content_31215162.htm).

The purpose of the “inclusive finance” initiative is to empower and transform villagers by giving them means and responsibility to develop sustainable approaches to agriculture and to escape the conditions of economic scarcity that constrain their lives.

The main research objectives of this PhD research project will be  to: (1) Understand and assess the impacts and effectiveness of the “inclusive finance” program currently available to China’s rural residents; how accessible and cheap loans are changing lives and reducing poverty. (2) Understand the challenges and barriers to effective implementation of an “inclusive finance” poverty alleviation initiative in China, and the lessons that can be drawn from a case study of a rural village in China.

This project will adopt ethnographic approaches to embed the research in the local community and to gain acceptance and trust. The research will explore the effectiveness of the “inclusive initiative” by engaging with multiple actors, including those who are involved in the process of facilitating small loans to impoverished households and the recipients of such loans. The methods to be used will embrace  interviews, observations, including participant observation, and content and discourse analysis.

Through analysis of the collected materials the research will provide some assessment the effectiveness of the inclusive finance initiative in  meeting its aims of emancipatory empowerment, in the contexts studied. It will thereby provide policy makers with some guidance on the potential and effective design and implementation of inclusive and participatory approaches to powering poor people out of poverty through “inclusive finance”.

Eligibility

Home/EU and International applicants are eligible to apply.

Applicants are expected to have a First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or a good Master's qualification in Accounting, Anthropology, Business Studies, Politics, Sociology or related Social Science subjects.

Applicants must meet the English Language Requirements set by the University of Glasgow for PhD studies in Social Sciences: https://www.gla.ac.uk/international/englishlanguage/requirements/  

Applicants must be fluent in spoken and written Chinese, with a HSK level of 5 (score 240 or above) or Level 6 (score 180 or above) if Chinese is not the first language.

Experience of conducting fieldwork and qualitative research is desirable but not essential. International research experience especially in China is also desirable but not essential.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only). The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • A stipend indexed to the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate estimated at £14,999 Full-Time).
  • 100% Tuition Fee Waiver at the standard Home/EU or International rate.
  • Research Training Support Grant (RTSG) of up to £2,250 over 3 years (usually up to a maximum of £750 per year).

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'CoSS PhD Scholarship - Tackling poverty through "inclusive finance"'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the CoSS scholarship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • Cover letter detailing the following:
    1. Your research interests.
    2. A detailed course description of your Master's research training
    3. Details of any other relevant training and skills you have.
    4. Your long-term career goals.
    5. A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add  to, the research project.

The cover letter should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_McKernan_ASBS_CoSSPhDScholarship_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 30 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 10 May 2019. Interviews will take place by 24 May 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding

Key contact

Dr Yingru Li (Yingru.Li@glasgow.ac.uk)


AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair

AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair

Information on the University/Department

This is a collaborative PhD and the student will be supervised through both the Centre for Disability in the University of Glasgow’s School of Social and Political Sciences Research and the National Paralympic Heritage Trust.  The Centre for Disability research is a world leading research unit with a thriving research culture and a large number of postgraduate students.  They will be part of the University of Glasgow's College of Social Science Graduate School and will be able to take advantage of all the training and educational support provided through the College. The National Paralympic Heritage Trust was established in July 2015 to gather, protect and share British Paralympic Heritage and is a new and exciting contributor to the country’s sport heritage landscape. Their aim is to educate people regarding Britain’s founding role in the Paralympic movement and in doing so help them to understand the benefits of sport whatever your ability, become more aware of access requirements and, above all, change attitudes to disability in a positive manner.

The studentship will be jointly supervised by Professor Nick Watson at the University of Glasgow and Dr Vicky Hope Ward of the National Paralympic Heritage Trust

The studentship is intended to support the work and development of the sporting heritage community in the UK.

Project details

Little is currently known about the history of wheelchairs in general or the role of disabled people in their development.  For millions of disabled people around the world the wheelchair has been one of the most important and significant technological innovations of the 20th Century.  This research will look at the development of one particular chair, the sport wheelchair and their influence on the evolution of wheelchairs and on disability politics, as the innovations developed for sport chairs transferred from the courts and tracks to become incorporated into the design, manufacture and use of everyday wheelchairs.

Previous work which has explored the development of wheelchair from either medicine or engineering portray wheelchair development in terms of scientific and technological progress and in doing this has tended to obscure the complex social and technical interactions which have underpinned their development.  The sports wheelchair emerged through the actions of wheelchair users and wheelchair athletes as they sought to improve their performance on the courts and the track.  The innovations and developments they sought to implement often ran counter to the wishes of wheelchair manufacturers, health care professionals and those who controlled wheelchair sports.  The emergence of the sport wheelchair marks a significant moment not just in the history of sport and disability but also in the history of disability and disability politics.  It is this intersection that this project aims to uncover.

In reconstructing the of the development of the sport wheelchair the project will bring together the history of science and technology, the history of Paralympic sport and the history of disability politics and activism.  It will, in particular, look at the role of disabled athletes in this story and their agency and actions both in developing new innovations and incorporating new technologies into the wheelchair and in challenging those who sought to resist this development.  What will make this account so powerful is that it is a success story for a group who have historically been excluded from design processes.

The project will draw on archival and documentary sources and on oral histories.  In reconstructing the history the student will interview wheelchair users, wheelchair athletes, wheelchair designers, representatives from wheelchair manufacturers, medical and health professionals and government officials and civil servants. These oral histories will be supplemented by an extensive search of archival resources of a range of relevant publications including publications by disability groups such as; Magic Carpet (the journal of the Invalid Tricycle Association, ITA), Paraplegia News (the journal of the Paralysed Veteran's of America, PVA) Sports'n’Spokes (a journal also published by the PVA focusing on wheelchair sports). They will also review technical-scientific publications, such as Paraplegia, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the British Journal of Biomedical Science.  Other archives will include the UK's Public Records Office and the National Register of Archives and the National Archives in the US

Eligibility

We encourage applications from students with the following qualifications and experience:

Qualifications:

  • A first class, Upper Second (or equivalent) undergraduate degree, preferably in a relevant subject
  • Applicants should also have a Masters-level degree that satisfies AHRC eligibility requirements for advanced research training, or equivalent professional/occupational experience.
  • We may accept relevant work experience in lieu of a Masters. 

To be eligible for a full award a student must have a relevant connection with the United Kingdom. A relevant connection may be established if the following criteria is met:

  • The candidate has been ordinarily resident in the UK, meaning they have no restrictions on how long they can stay
  • Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the studentship. This means they must have been normally residing in the UK (apart from temporary or occasional absences)
  • Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals).

To be eligible for a fees only award:

  • Students from EU countries other than the UK are generally eligible for a fees-only award. To be eligible for a fees-only award, a student must be ordinarily resident in a member state of the EU; in the same way as UK students must be ordinarily resident in the UK.

To be eligible you will also need to be accepted onto the relevant PhD programme via University of Glasgow Admissions.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3.5 PhD programme. The additional 6 months supported by the funding will enable the student to undertake new development opportunities as part of their PhD programme.  

The programme will commence in October 2019. It includes

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2019/20 rate £15,009 Full-Time)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

The studentship can be held on a Full-Time or Part-Time basis. 

Application process

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation, and then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'AHRC Collaborative Studentship - A socio-political and technical history of the Sports Wheelchair'

  • College of Social Sciences funding application cover sheet
  • Academic transcript(s): Final and current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and an official translation, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s
  • Degree Certificate(s) and an official translation, if needed - scanned copy in colour of the original document/s 
  • References: 2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional) - one must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. If required, these can be sent from your referees directly to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk, with your full name and the studentship title to which you are applying as the subject
  • Curiculum Vitae (CV)
  • A 2 page statement outling why you are interested in this collaborative doctoral award and what you would bring to this project.

The statement should be a single document with the file named as follows *Yourname_Watson_SSPS_AHRCCollaborative_Date*

Applicants lodge their application via email: socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk

Closing Date: 30 May 2019

Selection process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 20 June 2019.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social & Political Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Professor Nick Watson (Nicholas.Watson@glasgow.ac.uk)