ESRC AQM Studentship: Strategic and Relational Models in International Climate Treaty-Making

ESRC AQM Studentship: Strategic and Relational Models in International Climate Treaty-Making

Description

Climate change is one of the most pressing societal challenges. While many consider the Paris Agreement a success, President Trump’s 2017 announcement to withdraw the US from the agreement has raised concerns about whether other states will also backtrack. This puts a fundamental, counterfactual question in the spotlight: Would the same announcement by any other country have triggered similar worries?

This seemingly innocuous question highlights a major challenge for our understanding of international cooperation. When governments make decisions about whether to join a treaty, such as the Paris Agreement, they consider two things: First, they are forward-looking and try to assess how their own treaty participation affects the likelihood of others to join the agreement.

Second, governments look backwards to see which countries have already ratified a treaty before deciding on their own action.

Existing statistical approaches ignore these strategic and relational contexts in which specific agreements are made; they only consider a government’s current choice, independent of how their own choice affects future behaviour by others (strategic context) and what to learn from historic ratifications (relational context). This PhD project hence proposes to assess, both substantively and statistically, the relative merits of two advanced quantitative methods: Strategic estimation and the relational event model (REM) to investigate international agreement-making to better understand the nature of government choice over time.

Both methods are new to the study of international agreement-making, so applicants would not be expected to already master these techniques at the beginning of the PhD; extensive training opportunities will be put in place to help the student acquire the necessary skills. An ideal candidate should have a background in political science, international relations, or a related social science with a strong quantitative focus or from (applied) statistics with a strong interest in international relations and climate agreement-making. Any of the following would be an advantage: familiarity with random utility models and/or strategic estimation; familiarity with relational event modelling and/or analysis of dynamic network data; the use of statistical packages, such as R; strong interest in climate change research and international treaty-making.

The PhD Project will be Lead-Supervised by Dr Patrick Bayer in the School of Social and Political Sciences.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or a Master's qualification or equivalent are required

The Award

The scholarship is open for 1+3 (1 year Masters followed by 3 year PhD), or +3 (3 years PhD only) commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the enhanced RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £17,777 full-time / £10,666.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant 

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'Strategic and Relational models in International Climate Treaty-Making Scholarship application' by 30 April 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC-AQM International Climate Treaty-Making Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Applicant Statement 

A statement of motivation that details your interest in the project and show good fit, especially in the view of the advanced quantitative nature of the project (2 pages max).

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Dr Patrick Bayer (Patrick.Bayer@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

 

ESRC AQM Studentship: Political Polarisation and Violence around Independence Movements: an Agent-Based Model of Echo Chambers and Tipping Points

ESRC AQM Studentship: Political Polarisation and Violence around Independence Movements: an Agent-Based Model of Echo Chambers and Tipping Points

Description

Online social networks (e.g., Twitter) and offline social networks (e.g., friendships, kindship ties, and workplace contacts) work together to produce mass opinions on political issues through contagion, homophily, and segregation processes. One issue that can be subject to heated debates and diverse opinions is the issue of independence of a region from a nation state or federal system.

For example, on 1 October 2017, violent clashes between Spanish police and Catalan independence supporters, resulting in hundreds of deaths, were the outcome of such polarization processes in online and offline social networks. In other cases of independence movements, there are no outbreaks of violence or casualties. What explains the degree of polarisation in a given society around collective issues like independence, which sometimes leads to violent clashes between groups and in other cases merely results in collective inertia?

The AQM PhD project tries to answer this question using advanced quantitative methods, including agent-based modelling, network analysis, social media analysis, and statistical inference. The overall aim of the project is to explain differential degrees of polarisation among citizens around an issue like secession by drawing on online and offline networks and political variables and combining them in an agent-based model. This aim will be achieved through three specific objectives:

1. Construction of an agent-based model to explain social influence and polarisation processes in multiplex networks, drawing on theories from political science and network science.

2. Collection of empirical data on social media networks from a real-world context to calibrate the ABM.

3. Simulation of offline social networks among citizens based on empirical data to refine the model calibration, using inferential statistical techniques for social network analysis.

The successful candidate will have an undergraduate and/or master’s degree in politics, sociology, public policy, statistics, network science, or related fields, a strong background in quantitative social science, a working knowledge of R, experience with collecting and managing social media data (such as Twitter), theoretical or applied knowledge of the independence movements, and experience with theories of political communication and information diffusion through social media.

The PhD Project will be Lead-Supervised by Dr Philip Leifeld in the School of Social and Political Sciences

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or equivalent are required

The Award

The scholarship is open for 1+3 (1 year Masters followed by 3 year PhD), or +3 (3 years PhD only) commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the enhanced RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £17,777 full-time / £10,666.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Political Polarisation and Violence around Independence Movements Scholarship application' by 22 April 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC-AQM Independence Movements Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Applicant Statement 

A brief statement outlining interest in the project and how you meet the project requirements (1-2 pages).

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Dr Philip Leifeld (Philip.Leifeld@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Multiple Hypothesis Testing in Finance - Acanto Research Studentship

Multiple Hypothesis Testing in Finance - Acanto Research Studentship

Description

In financial modelling, researchers aim to develop models that explain the behavior of financial time series and phenomena. They face two problems: first, they have to identify the set of variables that affect the series under study; second, they have to ensure that the proposed model is robust and the results can be generalized. In many occasions, the Quantitative Finance and Econometrics literature has been unable to offer sufficient or unambiguous tools to assist researchers, leading to a series of debates among finance academics and practitioners. For example, in asset pricing, several models have been presented (e.g., Single Index model, Fama-French three or five-factor models, etc.). What variables affect the asset returns and under what conditions? In financial trading, similar concerns apply. Does the Efficient Market Hypothesis hold? Does technical analysis have any value? Do statistical arbitrage techniques exist? Similar debates have risen in almost all aspects of finance and the literature has been filled with models with contradicting empirical evidence.

Based on the seminal work of White (2000), various tests have been developed aiming to investigate the robustness of competitive models and identify the appropriate drivers of a financial variable. Although the literature is new, there is a wealth of tests (see, amongst others, Hansen and Lunde, 2005; Hsu and Kuan, 2005; Romano et al., Hsu et al., 2010, Bajgrowicz and Scaillet, 2012). Early attempts in the field of technical analysis have already been conducted (Lo et al., 2000; Neely and Weller, 2013; Bajgrowicz and Scaillet, 2012), which, nevertheless, are restricted to simple trading and fundamental rules. Additionally, the aforementioned literature does not exploit the latest developments in bootstrapping or the latest Statistical methods in controlling the Family wise error rate and the false discovery ratio. 

The aim of the project is to develop new tests on multiple hypothesis that are flexible and efficient and to apply them in trading problems (such as trading and the Adaptive Market Hypothesis, volatility trading and its robustness or statistical arbitrage under different market conditions).

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply as well as students already in their first year of a University of Glasgow PhD. Full-time students are eligible. 

The successful applicant needs to have a good knowledge of Statistics (bootstrapping), programming and trading.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate estimated at £14,764 full-time/£8,858.40 part-time)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
  • a research support grant of £750 (£450 part-time) per annum
  • opportunity for an internship at Acanto Holding, Hannover, Germany
  • access to the Acanto Holding finance databases

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to georgios.sermpinis@glasgow.ac.uk by 23 April 2018.

Academic Transcript(s)

Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate).

2 references

On official headed notepaper and signed by referees.

References given to candidates in sealed envelopes should be opened, scanned and attached to the email.

References can also be emailed direct to georgios.sermpinis@glasgow.ac.uk by referees via their official University email address; clearly labelling the reference e.g. “John Smith XX Scholarship Reference”

Copy of CV

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

 

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

ESRC Collaborative Studentship: Developing a Behavioural and Experiential Understanding of Fuel Poverty

ESRC Collaborative Studentship: Developing a Behavioural and Experiential Understanding of Fuel Poverty

Description

Fuel poverty persists, despite fifteen years of policy attempts to eradicate it.  A new Scottish Government fuel poverty strategy proposes a revised fuel poverty definition that uses the concept of health vulnerability and a post-housing costs measure of incomes to better target affected households.  Alongside income, fuel prices and energy performance, occupant behaviour has been recognised as a fourth driver of fuel poverty yet few solutions have been identified to address this other than the provision of advice to occupants after warmth and energy interventions carried out within the home. Meanwhile, energy efficiency interventions can be ineffective in reducing fuel payment difficulties for occupants.

This research attempts to develop the behaviourist perspective on fuel poverty and to extend the notion of vulnerability beyond health risks from cold homes to include social, financial and psychological vulnerability.  A partnership between the University of Glasgow and the Energy Agency, a charity that works with Scottish Government and local authorities to provide advice and warmth and energy installations to householders, will enable a mixed-methods pre- and post-intervention study of recipients. In-depth interviews with occupants will be combined with environmental monitoring and diary keeping to investigate how people understand and value warmth and energy use, what other factors affect their use of heating and energy consumption, how their reality of heating regimes and fuel costs compare to official norms, and what differences interventions make to their fuel poverty experience and to their health and wellbeing.

The research is intended to provide a broader interpretation of fuel poverty beyond simple financial and energy efficiency metrics, to assess some of the key criteria within the official definition of fuel poverty vulnerability, to inform better targeting of vulnerable households, and to make existing interventions more effective as well as suggesting additional ways to assist people and reduce their risk of fuel poverty.

The student will be based in Urban Studies within the School of Social & Political Sciences. Urban Studies is a leading multi-disciplinary centre of urban, housing and broader public policy research, and was ranked joint first for its subject in UK’s REF 2014.  Supervision will be provided by Professors Ade Kearns and Mhairi Mackenzie of UoG, and by Dr Cassandra Dove of Energy Agency (EA).  It is anticipated that some time will be spent at The Energy Agency both pre-fieldwork, to become familiar with how interventions are delivered to households, and as part of the process of recruiting households to the study. Further opportunities to engage with the wider policy and energy efficiency sector will be available and assisted by EA as well as the supervisors.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or a Master's qualification or equivalent are required

The successful applicant must be able to demonstrate:

  • Evidence of excellent oral and written communication skills.
  • High level of original, intellectual and creative thought and argument in relation to topics relevant to the research.
  • A desire to inform practical and policy solutions to social problems through rigorous research.

The Award

The scholarship is open for Full-Time and Part-Time 1+3 (1 year Masters followed by 3 year PhD), or +3 (3 years PhD only) award, commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £14,777 full-time / £8,866.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'Fuel Poverty Scholarship application' by 29 April 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC-Collaborative Fuel Poverty Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Applicant Statement 

Applicants are required to submit a statement (max 600 words) expressing their thoughts on some of the key conceptual or theoretical issues that may need to be addressed, and on the methodological challenges that may be faced, in the research.

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Professor Ade Kearns (Ade.Kearns@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

ESRC Collaborative Studentship: Determinants and impact of wellbeing during university-to-work transitions

ESRC Collaborative Studentship: Determinants and impact of wellbeing during university-to-work transitions

Description

Youth represents a high-risk population for mental health problems (ONS, 2017). Particularly, within the higher education setting, health and wellbeing issues have been referred to as the invisible problem (Martin, 2010) and multiplicities of pressures (e.g. financial difficulties, self-image and identity) on students that impact mental wellbeing have been identified (NUS Scotland, 2010; UniversitiesUK, 2015).  Although there is now considerable interest in structural inequalities in student wellbeing, precarious youth transitions (Ainley & Allen, 2013; Gardiner, 2014) and youth wellbeing in work, empirical research on wellbeing during university-to-work transitions is scarce.

New entrants into the graduate labour market face unprecedented ambiguity, uncertainty and precariousness in their outcomes upon graduation, which are often constrained by eg labour market opportunities and relocation/accommodation costs, adversely impacting on transition into independent adulthood (Stone et al, 2014). Successful transitions (e.g. securing interesting work) positively impact graduate wellbeing (Reino & Byrom, 2017). Nevertheless, university leavers often lack the career-related experience to help them negotiate this complex terrain (Okay-Somerville & Scholarios, 2014). Despite increasing pressure to engage in employability activities early in their course (QAA, 2016), graduates report insufficient career-related support from universities (Reino & Byrom, 2017) and considerable levels of stress and anxiety (NUS Scotland, 2010; Okay-Somerville & Scholarios, 2017). Against this background, the proposed research seeks to address the determinants and impact of wellbeing during university-to-work transitions.

The key research question the proposed project aims to address is: How does wellbeing impact university-to-work transitions? In achieving this aim, the key objectives of this research are to:

  • Improve understanding of the determinants of university leavers’ wellbeing
  • Examine the impact of wellbeing on student experience, career management and employment outcomes
  • Extend our understanding of student wellbeing and university-to-work transitions from an interdisciplinary perspective, which considers the role of agency and structure in labour market entry, and 
  • Develop recommendations for wellbeing-oriented prevention and intervention programmes to assist university leavers as they transition into the world of work.

A mixed-methods, multi-source study is proposed, composed of: (i) semi-structured interviews and focus groups key stakeholders, and (ii) a longitudinal survey for systematically examining the changes in student wellbeing through the final year and its impact on successful university-to-work transitions.

The academic supervisory team consists of researchers from the School of Education (Dr Lesley Doyle) and Adam Smith Business School (Dr Belgin Okay-Somerville) at the University of Glasgow. The non-academic supervision is provided by Student Minds, the UK’s student mental health charity, who will also make invaluable in-kind contributions, such as facilitating access to samples and dissemination of findings.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or a Master's qualification or equivalent are required

The Award

The scholarship is open for 1+3 (1 year Masters followed by 3 year PhD), or +3 (3 years PhD only) commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £14,777 full-time / £8,866.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'University-to-work transitions Scholarship application' by 30 April 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC-Collaborative University-to-work transitions Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Applicant Statement 

A brief statement outlining interest in, and suitability to, undertake this research (max 2 pages).

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Dr Belgin Okay-Somerville (Belgin.Okay-Somerville@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

ESRC-SDS Collaborative Studentship: Explaining employer engagement with apprenticeships

ESRC-SDS Collaborative Studentship: Explaining employer engagement with apprenticeships

Description

The project is funded by the ESRC and Skills Development Scotland (SDS). The aims of the project are to explore the factors that influence employers' decisions about whether or not to develop apprenticeships, engage with apprenticeship policy, and how employers seek to shape the policy context around apprenticeship provision.

To achieve this, the research will use a mixed methods approach (secondary analysis of surveys and case studies of employers) to explore varying levels of employer engagement with apprenticeships in Scotland. In the first year, the doctoral researcher will explore existing quantitative data sets to identify patterns of engagement with apprenticeship provision. This analysis will inform the selection of at least six employer case studies in key sectors. The second year will therefore be spent working to secure access with participating employers, to understand the pressures within their sectors and industries, and interviewing key stakeholders (employers, managers, policy makers etc). The third year will be spent analyzing the data and writing up the doctoral thesis.

The successful applicant will work closely with individual employers as well as SDS and other stakeholders to deliver theoretically-rigorous and policy-relevant research. The project will result in reports to stakeholders as well as a written doctoral thesis.

Given the extensive work with employers, it is important that candidates have an understanding of how employing organisations make decisions. An interest in labour market policy is also an advantage. Candidates should be keen to develop strong qualitative research skills, and be open to opportunities to undertake training to develop quantitative data analysis skills. Candidates are likely to have a social science background, with some evidence of an enthusiasm to understand business decisions.

The PhD Project will be Lead-Supervised by Professor Melanie Simms in the Adam Smith Business School.

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information
http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or equivalent are required

The Award

The scholarship is open for 1+3 (1 year Masters followed by 3 year PhD), or +3 (3 years PhD only) commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £14,777 full-time / £8,866.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'Explaining employer engagement with apprenticeships Scholarship application' by 30 April 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC-SDS Collaborative Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Applicant Statement 

A statement outlining your suitability to undertake this research (500 words max).

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

 

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Professor Melanie Simms (Melanie.Simms@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by a selection panel and shortlisted applicants will be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Fully-funded PhD scholarships in international economic history at the University of Glasgow (EURECON project funded by the European Research Council)

Fully-funded PhD scholarships in international economic history at the University of Glasgow (EURECON project funded by the European Research Council)

Applications are invited for one 3-year PhD scholarship in Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow.

The successful candidate will be part of the ERC-funded project The Making of a Lopsided Union: Economic Integration in the European Economic Community, 1957-1992 (EURECON) led by Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (Grant Agreement n°716849). They are expected to begin on 1 October 2018.

Description of the EURECON project

The goal of EURECON is to explore European policymakers’ views about how to make the organisation of the European Economic Community (EEC) fit for the creation of a single currency, from 1957 to 1992. It is often said that the euro has faults of conception. But how did this happen? How was the euro made in such a way that it nearly completely overlooked some critical aspects of monetary unions? The assumption is that in the run-up to the 1992 Maastricht Treaty, European policymakers just did not think properly about how to make the Euro work. Was this really the case? Did European policymakers really overlook the economic foundations of European monetary union?

The project aims to examine European policymakers' debates and proposals, understand the reasons for their success or failure, identify the dynamics of political and economic trade-offs and compromises, shifting priorities, and alternative approaches that were abandoned at the time but recycled later. The project focuses on five work packages: macroeconomic policy coordination, fiscal transfers, capital market integration, banking harmonisation/supervision and the deepening of the common/single market. The project will examine the origins of the issues that are currently bedevilling the European Union (EU) by investigating the period between the creation of the EEC in 1957 and the decision to create a European single currency in 1992.

PhD position

The PhD project will focus on the role and influence of non-state, non-EEC actors and factors in the above discussions. Interested applicants should focus specifically on the role of one of the following actors/factor:

  • Big business (other than banks): The implementation of the common/single market, the issue of EEC fiscal transfers, and macroeconomic policy coordination had an impact on the conduct of business in Europe. Did big business consider that these developments would improve their environment, in creating more business opportunities, easier financing and trade? The Roundtable of Industrialists famously lobbied for the Single Market Project; did big business aim to actively support or oppose other developments at different time periods?
  • Trade unions: Macroeconomic policy coordination, EEC fiscal transfers, and the development of the common/single market had an important impact upon labour relations. How did trade unions try to influence European economic policymaking? In particular, how did they promote European social policies and how did they cope with the challenges induced by European economic integration in a globalising world? The rise of unemployment in Europe from the 1970s as well as the reflections mentioned above about the introduction of an EEC-wide unemployment benefit provided an important points of interest for trade unions.

The successful candidate is expected to:

-          Write a PhD thesis under the supervision of Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol

-          Be an active part of the EURECON project and work in close cooperation with other team members

-          Present papers at conferences

-          Publish in international peer-reviewed journals (individual and co-authored)

-          Participate in yearly workshops organised within the scope of EURECON.

The successful candidate will register for a PhD in Economic and Social History, School of Social and Political Sciences, College of Social Sciences, University of Glasgow.

The scholarship covers the successful student’s full-time Home/EU tuition fees and stipend, both at RCUK levels, and includes a research budget allowance to cover expenses related to archival research and conference attendance (at least £1500 p.a.).

PhD students at the University of Glasgow benefit from the College of Social Sciences’ Graduate School Research Training Programme, as well as an annual Thesis Review Committee and an annual Doctoral Retreat. PhD students may also have the opportunity to become Graduate Teaching Assistants and gain teaching experience.

Candidates must be fluent in English. A good command of another European language would be an advantage.

How to apply

Please include the following supporting documentation with your application:

-          Your CV

-          Your research proposal focusing on one of the actors/factors outlined above (max. 2500 words, including footnotes, references and bibliography)

-          Your degree transcripts

-          Your English language certificate

-          Two letters of reference

Interested candidates should apply on the University of Glasgow’s Online Application System http://www.gla.ac.uk/research/opportunities/howtoapplyforaresearchdegree/#/. Applicants should put ‘EURECON’ in the ‘Research Title’ field in ‘Step 6 – Course Details’ of the application form, and select ‘PhD in Economic and Social History (Research)’.

Interested applicants are strongly advised to discuss their research proposal with Dr Emmanuel Mourlon-Druol (emmanuel.mourlon-druol@glasgow.ac.uk) before they apply.

Short-listed candidates may be invited for an interview in Glasgow.

Application deadline is 30 April 2018.

Work on Demand: Contracting for Work in a Changing Economy

Work on Demand: Contracting for Work in a Changing Economy

Description

The Work on Demand (‘WorkOD’) project seeks to investigate the ever-evolving nature of contracts and contracting behaviour in the world of work – not only contracts of employment, but also those of casual, ‘zero-hours’, and self-employed workers. A particular point of focus is the emerging ‘gig’ or ‘on demand’ economy, in which consumers order a range of services, or delivery of a range of goods, online or via smart phone apps. The project has a strong comparative dimension, and will analyse differences in forms of contract and contracting behaviour across jurisdictions and over the course of several decades. A key innovation is the characterisation of contracting for work as an instance of economic, social and legal behaviour. With the aim of developing a new methodology for the study of work contracts, the project seeks to synthesise elements of economic sociology, sociology of law, and political economy into a new ‘economic sociology of labour law’. The relevance of this work will extend beyond the field of labour law into other legal disciplines and branches of social science.

The project is motivated by a normative and empirical concern with the continued viability of systems of labour law that are, broadly-speaking, protective of workers’ interests. It builds on previous research conducted by the Principal Investigator, Professor Ruth Dukes (School of Law), into traditional and more recent market-based approaches to the study of labour law. It is funded by a European Research Council Starting Grant.

Eligibility

Home/EU and international applicants are eligible to apply. Only full-time students are eligible.  Candidates must have a first, upper second class honours, and/or Master’s degree in a relevant discipline (eg Law, Sociology, Political Science). They should have a good knowledge of current trends and debates in the fields of labour law and the organization of working relationships. Knowledge of a second language is desirable.

For candidates whose first language is not English, we require IELTS 7.0 (with 6.5 in each component) or equivalent.   

The successful applicants will be expected to enroll in a PhD on a Full-Time basis (these scholarships cannot be held on a Part-Time basis) and should have a good knowledge of current trends and debates in the fields of labour law and the organization of working relationships. Knowledge of a second language is desirable.

The Award

The scholarship will run for a maximum of 3 years full-time commencing on 1 October 2018 and will provide:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home/EU or International rate
  • additional financial support for fieldwork and conference attendance

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk by 10 June 2018:

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> CoSS Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Research Proposal

A brief 2-page document outlining the applicant’s proposed contribution to the research project.

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered.

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Professor Ruth Dukes (Ruth.Dukes@glasgow.ac.uk

Selection Process

Applications will be assessed by the Project Team and shortlisted applicants may be invited to an interview.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

ESRC Dataset Award: Chances or Choices? Influences on Young People’s Learning Decisions in the Glasgow City Region and the Implications for Employer Engagement

ESRC Dataset Award: Chances or Choices? Influences on Young People’s Learning Decisions in the Glasgow City Region and the Implications for Employer Engagement

Description

This PhD aims to more fully understand the relationship between school subject choices and attainment and post school outcomes, and how and under what circumstances employers can best help shape learning experiences and learning choices, with a focus on disadvantaged areas in the Glasgow city region.

In spite of the universal support for employer engagement in education, and a widespread acknowledgment that young people need more help to make informed choices about their learning, many key questions remain unanswered. They include what services can employers best provide? Does employer engagement affect attainment and skills development, and how? How influential is exposure to work on young people’s career interests and knowledge of routes into work?  There are also important questions about whether employer engagement really helps to bridge or to extend social divides. Do young people get different benefits from employer engagement according to social background or school, particularly when more advantaged schools may already have access to networks of alumni, and well connected parents?

The provisional work plan for the PhD will include: 1. A survey of UK and international literature on purposes, methods and outcomes of employer engagement in education, and on subject choices and their implications; 2. A quantitative analysis of subject choices among secondary school children (for example by gender, ethnicity, school and home neighbourhood), using a large data on educational attainment that the supervisors already hold; 3. Qualitative research in a small number of case study schools, where young people and teachers will be interviewed at critical subject selection points.

It is likely that the findings of the PhD will highlight the relative importance of factors influencing young people’s decisions, including young people’s own understandings of the links between subject choices and employment, and flushing out socio-structural and personal influences. The research is expected to highlight the potential value of more extensive and deeper employer engagement, particularly for better preparing young people as economic actors, and shaping subject choices in order to address skill deficits.

The ideal candidate would hold a Masters degree, have an academic background in social sciences or education, and have a strong orientation to mixed-methods research, including demonstrable quantitative data analysis skills.

The PhD is funded by the ESRC. It will be supervised by Prof. Keith Kintrea (Urban Studies, School of Social and Political Sciences), Dr Muir Houston and Dr Catherine Lido (both School of Education) and the successful candidate will join the Education and Place Research Group, which is associated with the Urban Big Data Centre at University of Glasgow. Skills Development Scotland will also provide support to the research. 

Eligibility

Home/EU applicants are eligible to apply.  

ESRC eligibility information 

http://www.esrc.ac.uk/funding-and-guidance/postgraduates/prospective-students/eligibility/index.aspx

ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool
https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/esrc-award-eligibility-checker-collaborative-awards-2018 

First or Upper Second Class Honours (2:1) or a Master's qualification or equivalent are required

The Award

The scholarship is only open for +3 (3 year PhD only) commencing in October 2018 and depending on your eligibility for a full award (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), will provide:

  • a stipend at the RCUK rate (2018-19 rate is £14,777 full-time / £8,666.20 part time)
  • 100 % tuition fee waiver
  • access to the Research Training Support Grant

If a fees only award is granted (see ESRC Eligibility information and Checker Tool above), this will provide a 100% tuition fee waiver only.

How to Apply

All applicants should complete and collate the following documentation then attach to a single email and send to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject line 'ESRC Dataset: Chances or Choices? Scholarship application' by 18 May 2018

1. Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s)

Final or current degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.

2. References

2 references on headed paper (academic and/or professional).

At least one reference must be academic, the other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee.

If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee's official university or business email account to socsci-scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. “<applicant name> ESRC Dataset Chances of Choices? Scholarship Reference”

3. Copy of CV

4. Statement of Interest

While the broad aims and approaches to the research have been established (see description, above) please explain why you are interested in the topic, provide your thoughts on the issues that are raised, and suggest how you would approach the work plan. Your response should not be more than 2 pages.

5. Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Doctoral Training Partnership Equal Opportunities Form

6. Copy of the ESRC Eligibility Checker Tool outcome

Any application which fails to meet the above requirements will not be considered. 

For further information or details about the Project

Please contact Professor Keith Kintrea (Keith.Kintrea@glasgow.ac.uk)

Selection Process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified of the decision on their application by the second week of August.

Please note that this is one of a number of studentships being advertised at the same time, and that there is a limit on the number of International studentships which can be funded overall. In the event that more International candidates are nominated than there are places, these candidates will be ranked and only the highest ranked will be eligible for the studentship.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the College of Social Sciences.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Closing Date:             18 May 2018