Postgraduate research funding

Postgraduate research funding

The following funded projects are currently accepting applications. Please refer to each project's adverts for full details and application processes.

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Connecting communities: transformative impacts of community garden networks

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Connecting communities: transformative impacts of community garden networks

Information on the University/Department

The studentship will be embedded within the Management subject group of the Adam Smith Business School at the University of Glasgow. Our postgraduate research training programme combines robust taught research training and applied research practice within a flexible timeframe of three to five years. Beginning with foundation training in research methods, you will follow advanced training pathways in qualitative and quantitative methodologies and benefit from extensive training in research skills. As a postgraduate, you will form the bedrock of our research community, and we will actively encourage you to publish your research and participate in research seminars, training retreats, workshops, conferences and presentations. 

Project details

A wealth of research highlights the benefit of community gardens to urban health and well-being (Draper and Freedmanm 2010), social inclusion (Crossan et al., 2016), and food security (Garett and Leeds, 2015). Urban populations continue to experience multiple deprivation that is linked to spatial vulnerability and limited access to green space. The prevalence of derelict land (SMID, 2016), privatisation of public space (Smith, 2018), and the prioritisation of property-based regeneration (Shaw et al., 2018) that are common characteristics of deprived communities all serve to intensify spatial inequality.  

We aim to examine transformative impacts of community garden networks and conceptualise mechanisms through which community-led gardens can empower communities to transform local food economies. In doing so, this research addresses calls for research on spatial vulnerability (Saatcioglu and Corus, 2016) that acknowledges the ways that consumer disadvantage can intensify due to geographical location. This resonates with our context and collaboration partner, Baltic Street Adventure Playground (BSAP), a third sector organisation that facilitates access to community green space in Dalmarnock – a community which belongs to 5% of the most deprived areas of Glasgow (SIMD, 2016).

Existing research identifies the positive outcomes of community gardens at the individual and community level. Limited research has examined the transformative impacts of these spaces to facilitate network building and social interaction across diverse groups within more deprived neighbourhoods.  This research examines how multiple growing spaces can connect to create transformative networks of food provision for spatially vulnerable communities. It develops a network approach to engage with key third sector organisations, community groups and consumers to generate critical insights into the transformative potential of community garden networks. This research will work towards building impact for communities by developing insights to support the practical development of community governed growing spaces, which may help tackle food inequality for low-income communities.  

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/ 

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

For 1+3

  • A 2:1 degree or equivalent preferably with a business and management component
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of community empowerment and food/environmental sustainability debates
  • Have a good grounding in community empowerment and food/sustainability issues

For +3

  • • A master’s good degree preferably with a business and management component
  • • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of community empowerment and food/environmental sustainability debates
  • • Have a good grounding in community empowerment and food/sustainability issues.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub:

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how you fit with, and can add to, the research project

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_CumbersGlasgowCollaborative_date*

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Professor Andrew Cumbers (Andrew.Cumbers@glasgow.ac.uk)


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Digitalising Sustainable Consumption

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Digitalising Sustainable Consumption

Information on the University/Department

Founded in 1451, the University of Glasgow is the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world, and has been named Scottish University of the Year 2018. Glasgow is a place that inspires ambitious people to succeed. A place where inquiring minds can develop their ideas. A place where people make discoveries that change the world.

The University of Glasgow includes among its alumni the father of economics Adam Smith, and the Adam Smith Business School is named in his honour. We aim to follow his legacy and create world changing graduates who make a positive impact on culture and society.

We help to transform organisations and careers. Our business is creating inspiring leaders, researchers and professionals whose research and relations with industry have real impact, influencing organisations as they develop and grow globally.

The School has the triple crown of accreditation and is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International), the European Quality Improvement System (EQUIS), and the Glasgow MBA is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA)

Project details

Overconsumption by consumers is a principle challenge to sustainability, thus, approaches that can foreground a sustained shift in consumer behaviour are critical. Mindfulness has been receiving attention in research on sustainable consumption to disrupt automatic thinking, enhance awareness and foster prosocial values and behaviours (e.g., Stanszus et al., 2017). There have also been calls for consumers and   businesses to be more mindful in their approaches to consumption and in their market offerings (e.g., Sheth et al., 2011). Digital devices, such as, mindfulness apps have emerged as common consumer tools (e.g., Dredge, 2016). Digitalisation offers consumers new ways of ‘managing, calculating, communicating and evaluating environmental and ethical information’ (Fuentes and Sorum, 2018). Digital devices offer assistance toconcerned consumers in terms of advice on what to buy, where to buy, who to boycott and buycott, etc. While such tools have the potential to facilitate more sustainable behaviours, it is unclear exactly how they can achieve this in practice.

Further, to date there has been no consideration of digital tools that seek to draw on the dual benefits of mindfulness and sustainability in a clothing consumption context. This research aims to examine the impact of digital devices in aiding consumers to be more sustainable and mindful in their clothing practices. In doing so, we conceptualise the role of digital tools in problematising consumption, and the provision of agency to consumers to approach their own sustainability concerns. This aligns with the vision of our collaborative partner, Save Your Wardrobe London (SYW) a technology startup,who via app technology are encouraging consumers to think more mindfully about their clothing and wardrobe behaviours. The app mixes AI (Artificial Intelligence) with IoT (Internet of Things) to bring a new experience to consumers to help them make the most of their wardrobe and extend the life of garments.

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

For 1+3

  • A 2:1 degree or equivalent with at least a 25% business and management component.
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of consumption ethics and clothing sustainability debates and/or mindfulness.

For +3

  • A master’s good degree with a business and management component
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of consumption ethics and clothing sustainability debates and/or mindfulness.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The statement letter should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_ShawGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s: 

For other information (e.g. on the project itself, please contact Deirdre Shaw (Deirdre.Shaw@glasgow.ac.uk)


ESRC SDS-Collaborative Studentship - Entrepreneurialism in Work (EiW): Its forms, requisite skills and enabling organisational factors

ESRC SDS-Collaborative Studentship - Entrepreneurialism in Work (EiW): Its forms, requisite skills and enabling organisational factors

Information on the University/Department

The University of Glasgow, established in 1451, is in the prestigious Russell Group of research intensive institutions and is the fourth oldest University in the United Kingdom. The University combines over five centuries of history with a contemporary focus on world changing research. The University, and the Adam Smith Business School, changes the world through engaging with policy and practice and stimulating economic impact through entrepreneurship and innovation. This scholarship perfectly represents these principles.

The successful applicant will work in the Subject (Department) of Management in the Adam Smith Business School within the College of Social Sciences. The Subject of Management provides a vibrant intellectual and social environment for PhD students, with over 75 currently registered. The latest REF exercise (2014) rated 95% of the Adam Smith Business School’s staff outputs as internationally recognised, and 67% as internationally excellent or world leading. Within Management there are six specialist Research Clusters within which PhD students are located. This project will be supervised by academics in the Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour (HROB) and Entrepreneurship, Development and Political Economy (EDPE) clusters. The Clusters provide an environment for collegial discussion and support, for example providing feedback on PhD students’ presentations and draft papers. Cluster members also welcome engagement with others’ PhD students, giving access to leading expertise beyond the immediate supervisors. The clusters organise regular research seminars, bringing in high profile external speakers. Relevant opportunities and events throughout the College of Social Sciences will also be available for the successful applicant, e.g. in the School of Education.

The Adam Smith Business School and Subject of Management are dedicated to developing their PhD researchers. At the outset of their studies, and then annually, students complete a training needs assessment to ensure they receive the training they require. Formal research methods training courses are offered through the Subject, School and the College of Social Sciences. Students also have access to a wide range of initiatives, resources and courses designed to support their research skills and professional development, from within and outwith the School and Subject. These activities are designed to complement core research methods training and ensure continuous skill development throughout the PhD. The School also offers an annual doctoral retreat with expert speakers and workshops, and a first year PhD study day.

The Subject and School also organise dedicated PHD social events, for example an annual Christmas dinner and a meal following students’ annual review presentations to their Clusters.

For more information on the Adam Smith Business School and its research please see https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/business/research/

For more information on the Subject of Management please see https://www.gla.ac.uk/subjects/management/

Project details

Entrepreneurialism is increasingly viewed as essential within existing organisations as well as for founding new ventures. It is possible to identify and develop the kinds of skills that are necessary for behaving entrepreneurially. However, simply focusing on individuals’ skills and abilities is insufficient, and attention is needed as to the kinds of organisational factors (such as structure, leadership and culture) which may enable EiW to flourish. This is particularly germane given evidence (e.g. in the Skills and Employment Survey) that the kinds of organisational and work arrangements which might stimulate EiW are not the norm in the UK and may even be in decline. There is, however, a timely but relatively recent policy focus in Scotland to stimulate innovative forms of work. This makes Scotland an ideal location for investigating EiW and how organisations may promote it.

A qualitative multi-case study approach is proposed, purposively sampling different kinds of organisations in Scotland pursuing EiW. We propose the student will sample established organisations across different sectors, as well as one or more new entrepreneurial ‘start up’ companies. Access to appropriate organisations will be enabled through the supervisors’ existing networks and through contacts built by the successful applicant. The final decision on research approach and design will rest with the applicant but must include a qualitative element.

Knowledge exchange and impact activities will be foregrounded throughout, for example through collaboration with Skills Development Scotland and the case study organisations. This will include, for example, the production and dissemination of ‘good practice' reports, and a short video. 

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must also meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree* (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component.
  • For a +3 award (see below) applicants must additionally have: a) A Master’s degree at merit or distinction level* with a substantial component allied to business, management or related areas; and b) The equivalent of 60 credits research methods training at Master’s level.
  • A demonstrable interest in, and knowledge of, organisations, work and entrepreneurship.
  • A good grounding in social science research methods, economic and management issues.

 * If degree results are not known at the time of application, we can take the application forward based upon grades achieved on the degree so far. Results will need to be confirmed prior to commencing the programme.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a three year ‘+3 ‘(PhD only) or a four year ‘1+3’ (research masters plus PhD) programme, depending on level of prior qualifications and research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • An annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time).
  • Fees at the standard Home rate.
  • Students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant (RTSG), usually up to a maximum of £750 per year.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A cover letter detailing the following:
    • Your research interests
    • A detailed course description of your Master's research training (where applying for the +3 award)
    • Details of any other relevant training and skills you have
    • Your long-term career goals
    • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_HurrellGordonGlasgowSDS_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the Adam Smith Business School. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For further information on the application process and eligibility criteria please contact William Shirriffs (William.Shirriffs@glasgow.ac.uk

For other information (e.g. on the project itself, please contact Scott Hurrell (Scott.Hurrell@glasgow.ac.uk) or Jillian Gordon (Jillian.Gordon@glasgow.ac.uk


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Legislative Change to the Private Rented Sector: A natural experiment between Scotland & England

Information on the University/Department

Funded by the ESRC, the Urban Big Data Centre (UBDC) is one of three big data centres in the UK. The UBDC has been investigating the possibilities of using big data and other innovative data sources to inform the understanding of the private rented sector (PRS). This PhD would be the next step for UBDC’s housing research, moving from testing new data sets to using them, in conjunction with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) and the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence (CaCHE). The UBDC currently has four PhD students who are encouraged to participate actively in the centre’s research group, workgroup meetings and centre seminars. PhD students are expected to present their work at different stages at school level but also in the centre.

The University of Glasgow hosts the ESRC funded CaCHE project. CaCHE is a research centre, networking hub and what works initiative. It runs six PhDs across the UK and has a strong commitment to early career researchers including a housing studies PhD summer school and an early careers researcher network. CaCHe  runs events, including in partnership with the Housing Studies Association. and has provided post-doc jobs to five researchers (soon to be seven) and employs three knowledge exchange officers. CaCHE has recently identified the PRS as one of its priorities moving forward and has recently held its annual conference on the Scottish market rental reforms. A major component of its work across the housing sector is to promote the rigorous use of evidence analysis and evaluation in testing interventions such as the regulatory changes recently introduced in Scotland.

SPICe is responsible for providing robust independent information to the Members of the Scottish Parliament.  This PhD is part-funded by their academic engagement programme. SPICe will input to the PhD providing a supervisor with expertise in housing policy. The student will benefit from the input of an expert in housing policy who has a vital understanding of communication with MSPs and policy makers. The collaboration provides valuable opportunities to communicate the results directly to MSPs and policy makers.

Project details

The Private Rental Sector (PRS) has tripled in size in a 20-year period following a long decline for most of the 20th Century. Many countries in Europe have successful PRSs but these are highly regulated. In the UK the PRS has had little regulation since the late eighties and is viewed, by some commentators, as the least stable of all tenures.  In addition to the growth of the PRS, the nature of private renting has also changed. Younger people now stay longer in private renting, with some predicted to spend much of their adult life in the PRS (“Generation Rent”). The number of households with children living in the PRS has also grown.  

In Scotland, changes have been made to legislation on PRS tenancies through the Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016. The Act has introduced a new tenancy with some limitations on rents and changes aimed at increasing security of tenure. The aim of this PhD is to examine whether changes to Scottish PRS legislation impacts on PRS supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants, by making comparison to England. The student will be expected to use data from a range of sources including repeated cross sectional UK surveys (e.g. Family Resource Survey, Annual Population Survey), longitudinal UK household surveys (Understanding Society) and big data sources (online rental advertisements database from the Urban Big Data Centre).

The PhD will be situated jointly in two of the UK's leading centres for housing and urban research, both based in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow . This will provide an unrivalled opportunity for training and development. The research will benefit from collaboration with the Scottish Parliament Information Centre (SPICe) who are part funding the PhD, and will also be represented on the supervisory team.  SPICe is the Scottish Parliament’s impartial research and information service.  As part of the collaboration, the successful candidate will be expected to spend some of their study time based in the SPICe offices in the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh. 

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of, housing studies and policy
  • Have a good grounding in quantitative methods and have some knowledge of regression modeling.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

The 1+3 scholarship is for candidates with a first degree in social sciences or a related area but no Masters-level training. For these candidates, the studentship would also provide fees and stipend for the additional year to complete the MRes in Urban Research as preparation for undertaking the PhD.  

Additional information

In the UK, the private rental sector has more than trebled in the last 20 years (DCLG 2017; Scottish Government 2017). This regrowth of the sector has led to widespread calls for greater regulation of rents and protection of tenants. A UK Government white paper suggested that longer tenancy and greater protection from rogue landlords might be considered in England (DCLG 2017). While some see rent control as protecting tenants from unaffordable rents, others see it as a way of reducing welfare benefit bills (House of Commons Library 2017). However, critics, particularly from the economics sphere, argue that rent controls have negative outcomes. While some politicians on the left have argued for rent controls, there are not wide spread calls for their return, rather some have called for some means of limiting extreme changes when they are particularly high (JRF 2012; De Santos 2012). Housing policy is devolved to the Scottish Government. There has been some ‘tinkering’ with PRS legislation in both England and Scotland, including tenancy deposit schemes, and landlord registration (in Scotland). However, the recent Private Housing (Tenancies) (Scotland) Act 2016 is the first move back, by the Scottish Government, to exert some limitations on rents and to offer greater security to tenants in Scotland. This PhD sets out to test if the current changes in Scotland have an impact in a number of areas of the PRS including supply, rents, security and satisfaction of tenants. The student will use a natural experiment approach using England as a control.

Candidates should have undertaken some initial training in statistics or quantitative research methods and, more importantly, be keen to develop their expertise in this area. The studentship provides an excellent opportunity to receive a training in advanced quantitative research skills, and in the exploitation of Big Data in particular – a relatively new and fast-growing field for researchers. The student will benefit from being associated with both the Urban Big Data Centre, the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence and the Scottish Parliament Information Centre. This collaboration will allow the student to draw on a supervisory team with a large breadth of skills but will also provide significant opportunities to promote the research and findings.

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Full academic transcript(s) from previous studies (undergraduate and postgraduate)
  • References
  • CV
  • A two or three page statement of interest detailing the following:
    • Your interest in the topic of the project
    • Issues you think are involved
    • An approach to studying these using national surveys and administrative date (from online advertisers)
    • Your long-term career goals

The statement of interest should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_GibbGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Mark Livingston (Mark.Livingston@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Minimum Core Obligations: Using a sociology of human rights to examine the potential for human rights budgeting in Scotland

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Minimum Core Obligations: Using a sociology of human rights to examine the potential for human rights budgeting in Scotland

Information on the University/Department

We offer a rich and vibrant research community at the University of Glasgow. The Sociology subject area has annual celebrations of student’s work in ‘away days’. We were ranked second in the UK during the last REF exercise and are strong on theory, methodology and impact. 

The successful student will join the Post-Graduate Research Student (PGR) cluster of the Glasgow Human Rights Network, of which JF was a founding member. This organization creates spaces for all academic staff and doctoral students working around human rights and notably includes disciplinary homes of business, law, politics and sociology. The PGR cluster have organized international conferences, masterclasses and workshops on all aspects of human rights and provides strong peer learning and support.

The successful student will also access similar resources from the University of Stirling’s School of Law. 

Project details

This project will be supervised by Dr Jo Ferrie (University of Glasgow – Sociology) and Dr Katie Boyle (University of Stirling – Law) and the successful applicant will be based at the University of Glasgow. In collaboration with the Scottish Human Rights Commission (SHRC) this project seeks to synthesise existing concepts of what constitutes a minimum core in the realisation of economic, social and cultural (ESC) rights as they potentially apply to Scotland, drawing on sociological, legal, and philosophical literatures. As part of the UK, Scotland has an obligation to fulfil ESC rights. Like other States, Scotland has not yet established a minimum core of ESC rights, meaning there is a potential accountability gap. The minimum core obligation (MCO) forms part of a duty to progressively realise (PR) ESC rights to the state’s maximum available resources (MAR). This project focusses specifically on the MCO element through an interdisciplinary lens asking what steps Scotland can take to meet this obligation, including budgetary allocation. As well as offering a unique synthesis of the existing knowledge, this project will deliver new data, using local authority structures and the example of the right to food, to reveal where structural barriers to delivering the MC of ESC rights operate. Evidence will be sought from information about budgets: How are they decided? How are they spent? Who decides how they are spent? The project aims to develop indicators to allow the systematic measurement of progress towards delivering ESC rights beyond food, and potentially, indicators that could work in other countries. In working with the SHRC, this project has the capacity to influence practices in Scotland. The Scottish Government have introduced in 2018 a new National Performance Framework measure around human rights, that, together with the recommendations of the First Minister’s Advisory Group on Human Rights Leadership, makes this a particularly timely project. It would substantially add to the knowledge base of the SHRC and by extension the Scottish Government and Parliament, while also adding significantly to the growing global literature on realising ESC rights.

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably in Sociology or Law, though other social science disciplines may be considered
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of human rights; current thinking around minimum core; human rights budgeting work; the UK’s legislative field pertaining to human rights and/or sociological approaches to human rights
  • Have a good grounding in research methods with some skills in both quantitative and qualitative approaches (does not need to be advanced)

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

Additional information

We are keen to hear from applicants with some experience working with a body such as the Scottish Human Rights Commission. This could be a third sector/voluntary organization or a public body with a similar remit around progressing justice. 

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_FerrieGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For other information please contact Dr Jo Ferrie (Jo.Ferrie@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Smart City Standards in Local Practice

ESRC Collaborative Studentship - Smart City Standards in Local Practice. An Evaluation of the Implementation of the BSI Smart City Standards in a Variety of UK Municipal Contexts

Information on the University/Department

This PhD Studentship will be based in the Urban Studies section in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Glasgow. It will involve an active collaboration with the Smart and Sustainable Cities and Communities Committee SDS/2 of the British Standards Institution (BSI; London).

The University of Glasgow, founded in 1451, is the fourth oldest university in the United Kingdom. It belongs to the prestigious Russell Group of research-intensive universities. Urban Studies at Glasgow is a world-leading centre for innovative, interdisciplinary urban research with significant impact. In the most recent national assessment of research excellence (REF 2014), the quality of its research was rated first equal in the UK, with half of all output considered ‘world leading’.

Urban Studies at Glasgow is home to three major research centres supported through national research grant funding: the GCRF Centre for Sustainable, Healthy and Learning Cities and Neighbourhoods; the UK Collaborative Centre for Housing Evidence; and the ESRC Urban Big Data Centre. This PhD project will be associated with the latter and, as such, contribute new knowledge about the governance of big data and related ‘smart city’ developments.

The successful applicant will be part of a vibrant community of over 20 doctoral researchers working on diverse aspects of urban theory, policy and practice. (S)he will be able to participate in regular seminars, workshops and other research activities hosted by Urban Studies. Furthermore, (s)he will benefit from formal research methods training and researcher development courses offered through the Graduate School of the College of Social Sciences.

The successful candidate will spend supervised periods of time at the BSI in London, conducting research in co-operation with the Smart and Sustainable Cities and Communities SDS/2 Committee.

Project details

Over the last decade, the ‘smart city’ has become a dominant paradigm of urban policy, espousing (digital) technological innovation to meet various urbanisation challenges. Responding to the need for definitional and practice guidance, the British Standards Institution (BSI) was among the first national agencies to issue a smart city standard in 2014, and has since published six in total. Similar developments have taken place across other countries, and at the International Standardization Organization. Hence, in a short time span, consensus standards have emerged as a novel type of policy tool, expected to guide and accelerate smart city innovation on the ground. However, little is known about how these standards actually intervene in local planning and development processes and, therefore, what their wider significance is.

This project will deliver a systematic evaluation of the implementation of the BSI smart city standards across a range of UK cities. Thus, it will contribute original knowledge since no detailed analysis of local practice use of smart city standards has been undertaken to date. Particularly, the study will address, using mixed methods (survey research, in-depth case study analysis etc.), to which extent the BSI smart city standards currently experience an implementation gap, a known phenomenon in the policy analysis literature. The research will thus probe into the possible misalignment of the standards’ function as envisaged by BSI and municipal practice realities where standards may not easily fit into established planning and development processes. 

The collaboration with the BSI is an essential component of this PhD. The involvement will bring access to key stakeholders, and the research will be used as input into a collaborative stakeholder engagement to consider possible improvements to standard design and/or practice guidelines. The collaboration thus also provides an important route to dissemination and impact. The mixed supervisory team (Prof. Simon Joss and Prof. Annette Hastings at the University of Glasgow, and Dr. John Devaney at the BSI) will ensure effective coordination, and support integrated training throughout.

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • A good first degree* (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • Demonstrate an interest in, and knowledge of, smart cities, urban governance, and policy analysis.
  • Have a good grounding in social science research methods, and contemporary urban governance issues.
  • For a +3 award (see below), applicants must additionally have: a) A Master’s degree at merit or distinction level* with a substantial component allied to urban studies, public policy or related areas; and b) Substantial research methods training (equivalent of 60 credits) at Master’s level

* If degree results are not known at the time of application, we can take the application forward based upon grades achieved on the degree so far. Results will need to be confirmed prior to commencing the programme.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes:

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A cover letter detailing the following:
    • Your research interests
    • A detailed course description of your Master's research training (where applying for the +3 award)
    • Details of any other relevant training and skills you have
    • Your long-term career goals
    • A short statement (max 1,000 words) explaining how the above fit with, and can add to, the research project.

The cover letter should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_JossGlasgow_date*   

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 15 March 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 05th April 2019. Interview dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within the School of Social and Political Sciences. Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact/s:

For further information on the application process and eligibility criteria please contact William Shirriffs (William.Shirriffs@glasgow.ac.uk

For other information (e.g. on the project itself, please contact Simon Joss (Simon.Joss@glasgow.ac.uk)  


ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Young people's lived experiences of welfare conditionality over time

ESRC Data Sets Studentship - Young people's lived experiences of welfare conditionality over time

Information on the University/Department

The PhD will be based within a thriving research environment in Urban Studies at the University of Glasgow, which is the UK’s leading urban research unit, within the interdisciplinary environment of School of Social and Political Sciences.  The project will be affiliated with the ‘Neighbourhoods, Welfare and Wellbeing’ Research Group at Urban Studies (which consists of researchers at all levels) and the candidate will work alongside doctoral candidates investigating similar topics, e.g. Universal Credit, welfare conditionality for disabled people etc.  Youth inequalities are a central concern of the wider School of Social and Political Sciences, forming a core contribution to the University research beacon on Inequality. 

Project details

This PhD is designed to re-analyse the 'Welfare Conditionality' Qualitative Longitudinal Research data set to establish original knowledge about how conditionality impacts on young people's lived experiences of claiming benefits and looking for work in Scotland and England. 

Welfare conditionality has been at the heart of a fundamental and controversial transformation of the British welfare system.  In contrast to traditional rights-based social security, conditionality aims to stimulate job entries by requiring intensive job-seeking behaviour, backed by one of the toughest sanctions regimes in the world (e.g. removing benefits for up to three years).  The on-going roll out of Universal Credit extends conditionality to in-work claimants, disabled people, carers, lone parents with pre-school children, and claimants' partners. 

Recent research suggests that young people aged 18-24 are disproportionately affected by these reforms because they are at twice the risk of unemployment (compared with those aged 25-64) and face the highest risks of benefit sanctions.  Young people are also multiply disadvantaged, with reduced social security entitlements than older citizens; lower earnings potential (lower national living wages); and confronted with barriers to establish housing and financial independence due to increasingly precarious work conditions and housing insecurity. Growing numbers of young people have hence become economically marginalised within a context of growing precarity in an unequal, insecure labour market characterised by underemployment and in-work poverty. However, little is currently known about how young people growing up in this context experience the policies that intensify conditionality and limit welfare support, which hold potentially harmful and long-lasting impacts. This doctoral project is designed to contribute new knowledge on how young people experience and are impacted by conditionality over time and whether conditionality is effective or ethical for them.

The candidate will work at the forefront of methodological innovation and learn and apply advanced large-scale qualitative data analysis techniques, including QSR NVivo framework matrix analysis, during the project.  The core objective is to work with secondary datasets and reanalyse the Welfare Conditionality youth data and, additionally, to potentially re-contact a group of the original participants for re-interview.

The outcome of the research will be new findings about the long-term impacts of welfare conditionality on young people and a set of policy and practice recommendations to address these in Scotland, UK and international levels.    

Eligibility

Students must meet ESRC eligibility criteria. ESRC eligibility information can be found here*: https://esrc.ukri.org/skills-and-careers/doctoral-training/prospective-students/ 

Applicants must meet the following eligibility criteria

  • A good first degree (at least 2:1), preferably with a social science component
  • Demonstrate an interest in and knowledge of youth studies, youth transitions, social security, welfare conditionality, and social/public policy.
  • Have a good grounding in qualitative research methods.

Award details

The scholarship is available as a +3 or a 1+3 programme depending on prior research training.  This will be assessed as part of the recruitment process.  The programme will commence in October 2019.  It includes

  • an annual maintenance grant at the RCUK rate (2018/19 rate £14,777 full-time)
  • fees at the standard Home rate
  • students can also draw on a pooled Research Training Support Grant, usually up to a maximum of £750 per year

Application process

Applicants must register their interest by completing the ESRC Eligilibility Checker: https://glasgow.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/supervisor-led-awards-esrc-award-eligibility-checker-201 

Applicants should then register on the Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences GradHub and fill out equal opportunity data (this is a requirement of the application process and equal opportunity data is used for monitoring purposes only, and not in the decision making process, completing and uploading the following documents on to GradHub

  • Application form
  • Academic transcripts
  • References
  • CV
  • A one or two page (A4) statement of interest detailing the following:
    • Your interest in the topic of the project
    • Relevant experience and knowledge of the topic and/or methods
    • Issues (and difficulties) you think are involved to conduct the research
    • Your career goals

The statement should be uploaded as a standalone document with the file named as follows *your name_WrightGlasgowDataSets_date*

Applications should be submit application through GradHub https://gradhub.sgsss.ac.uk

Closing Date: 05 April 2019

Selection process

Applications will be ranked by a selection panel and applicants will be notified if they have been shortlisted for interview by 1 May 2019. Interviews dates are to be confirmed.

All scholarship awards are subject to candidates successfully securing admission to a PhD programme within University of Glasgow.  Successful scholarship applicants will be invited to apply for admission to the relevant PhD programme after they are selected for funding.

Key contact

Dr Sharon Wright (Sharon.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk)