This Week’s Events

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Upcoming Events

Using Subgoal Labels to Reduce Cognitive Load in Learning

Group: Centre for Computing Science Education (CCSE)
Speaker: Briana Morrison, University of Nebraska Omaha
Date: 23 September, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

Cognitive load is the amount of resources utilized in an individual's working memory during learning. Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) is grounded in the human architecture of the brain, which has a limited capacity for working memory. All learning is processed in working memory before being stored in long term memory. If the total amount of processing required to learn exceeds the limited capacity of working memory, then learning is impaired. Worked examples are a type of instructional material used to teach procedural problem-solving processes by giving learners concrete examples of the procedure being used to solve a problem, showing the explicit steps in the problem-solving process. Worked examples are used to decrease the cognitive load on the user during the learning process. Using subgoals in worked examples further reduces cognitive load by illustrating the salient points in the problem solving process which can be generalized across problems.  The subgoal learning framework has been used in programming and other fields to breakdown procedural problem solving into smaller pieces that novices can grasp more easily, but it has only been used in short-term interventions. In this talk, I will discuss how the subgoal learning framework was implemented throughout a semester-long programming course to explore its longitudinal effects. Of 265 students in multiple sections of the course, about half of them received subgoal-oriented instruction while the other half received typical instruction. Learning subgoals consistently improved performance on quizzes, which were formative and given within a week of learning a new procedure, but not on exams, which were summative. While exam performance was not statistically better, the subgoal group has lower variance in exam scores and fewer students dropped or failed the course than in the control group. Learner characteristics were explored to determine how subgoal learning affected students at risk of dropout or failure.

First FATA Seminar 2019/2020

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: David Manlove, School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow
Date: 24 September, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room



Intra-Systems Seminar: Opening Talk for 2019/2020

Group: Intra-Systems Seminar
Speaker: Dimitrios Pezaros, University of Glasgow
Date: 25 September, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 13:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

Systems Seminar: Building a New World of Anonymisation, Trust and Privacy

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Bill Buchanan, Edinburgh Napier University
Date: 25 September, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

We have often built systems which lack any form of real trust, and which have little respect for privacy and consent. This presentation will outline some of the methods which can be used to build a more trustworthy world, and will includes the theoretical and practical aspects of zero-knowledge proofs, homomorphic encryption, ring signatures, privacy-preserving machine learning and bulletproofs. Along with this the presentation will outline the key risks that we have around the development of quantum computers and will outline the methods which could be used to overcome the breaking of public key methods. Finally the talk will outline light-weight cryptography methods, and how we can secure devices on limited compatibility devices.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 26 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

Machine Learning Models for Inference from Outliers

Group: Inference, Dynamics and Interaction (IDI)
Speaker: Mahesan Niranjan, University of Southampton
Date: 26 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

Abstract:

While much of recent literature on machine learning address regression and classification problems, several problems of interest relate to detecting a relatively small number of outliers from large collections of data. Such problems have been addressed in the context of target tracking, condition monitoring of complex engines and patient health monitoring in an intensive care setting, for example. The popular approach, in these settings, of estimating a probability density over normal data and comparing the likelihood of a test observation against a threshold set from this suffers the well known problem of the curse of dimensionality. Circumventing this involves modelling – data driven or otherwise – to capture known relationships in the data and looking for novelty in the residuals. This talk will describe several problems taken from the Computational Biology, Chemistry and Fraud Detection  domains to illustrate this. We will discuss structured matrix approximation and tensor methods for multi-view data and suitable algorithms for their estimation.

 

Speaker:

Mahesan Niranjan is Professor of Electronics and Computer Science at the University of Southampton. Prior to this appointment in 2008, he has held academic positions at the University of Cambridge as Lecturer in Information Engineering and at the University of Sheffield as Professor of Computer Science. At Sheffield, he also served as Head of Computer Science and Dean of Engineering. His research is in the area of Machine Learning, and he has worked on both the algorithmic and applied aspects of the subject. Some of his work has been fairly influential in the field – e.g. the SARSA algorithm widely used in the Reinforcement Learning literature. More recently, his focus of research is in data-driven inference problems in computational biology. More from:  https://tinyurl.com/y5fnymel

FATA Coffee

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: All welcome
Date: 26 September, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Computing Science Common Room

How to read a cyber security job description - and how not to write one

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 27 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 14:00
Location: Dewar Centre, Glover Street, Perth, PH2 0TH, United Kingdom

SICSA Cyber Nexus is running a workshop on "How to read a cyber security job description - and how not to write one". It will take place on Friday 27th September in Perth It's hard to write a good cyber security job description. Sometimes they look like scary long lists of technical skills that no one person is likely to have, and some soft words about what people need to be like that are hard to evaluate. As a result, people who would make excellent employees fail to apply. In this event, for companies who hire cyber security staff and students who are curious about the sector, we'll be sitting down together to take a look at some real job descriptions and ask some questions. Students should learn how to read the intention behind these mystifying documents, and employers, how to write them. In order to attend, students must write a sentence about themselves why they want to come, tell us what university or college and what course they are on, and what travel costs they would incur to attend the event. Women are especially encouraged to apply. We will choose participants to make the group as diverse as possible. Reasonable student costs will be reimbursed if claims with receipts are made by 15 October. Do not book tickets until you receive an email confirming your place and travel spending limit. Employers must confirm that they will be able contribute one and preferably two job descriptions for small group discussion, by emailing them to us with a deadline of 23 September. They need not be live adverts, but should be from the last two years. Contributors: Aileen O'Hagan, EQUATE Scotland Others, to be confirmed

IDI Journal Club

Group: Deep learning reading group
Speaker: Grimur Hjorleifsson Eldjarn, University Of Glasgow Computing Science
Date: 27 September, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

Grimur will be presenting the UMAP paper:
Abstract:
UMAP (Uniform Manifold Approximation and Projection) is a novel manifold learning technique for dimension reduction. UMAP is constructed from a theoretical framework based in Riemannian geometry and algebraic topology. The result is a practical scalable algorithm that applies to real world data. The UMAP algorithm is competitive with t-SNE for visualization quality, and arguably preserves more of the global structure with superior run time performance. Furthermore, UMAP has no computational restrictions on embedding dimension, making it viable as a general purpose dimension reduction technique for machine learning.

 

Additionally, please bring papers that you would like to present for future sessions. We'll go through them for the last 5-10 min and decide what to review next.

FATA Seminar: Mini-talks

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: David Manlove, Jess Enright, Patrick Prosser, Michele Sevegnani, School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow
Date: 01 October, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 03 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem "Hybrid Reasoning for Robotics using Answer Set Programming"

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 03 October, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: The School of Informatics, Crichton Place, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

We are delighted to welcome Professor Esra Erdem as our SICSA DVF. Professor Erdam will be giving a talk on Hybrid Reasoning for Robotics using Answer Set Programming at the University of Edinburgh on 3 October. Abstract: Hybrid reasoning for robotics necessitates combining discrete high-level reasoning with continuous feasibility checks and perception. We propose to address such hybrid reasoning problems with a causality-based approach using Answer Set Programming (ASP). The idea is (i) to represent the robotic actions and change in a high-level language of ASP, which allows embedding continuous feasibility checks into logical formulas by means of formal interfaces, and (ii) to compute feasible solutions to hybrid reasoning problems using state-of-the-art ASP solvers and relevant feasibility checkers within a modular architecture. We discuss this hybrid approach in the context of two main reasoning tasks: planning of robotic actions for a feasible execution, and explanation generation of failures via diagnostic reasoning. We illustrate its applications in different robotic domains. Short Bio: Esra Erdem is an associate professor in computer science and engineering at Sabanci University. She received her Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Texas at Austin (2002), and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto and Vienna University of Technology from 2002 to 2006. Her research is in the area of artificial intelligence, in particular, the mathematical foundations of knowledge representation and reasoning, and their applications to cognitive robotics and computational biology. Professor Erdem is being hosted at the University of Edinburgh by Professor Subramanian Ramamoorthy

FATA Coffee

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: All welcome
Date: 03 October, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Computing Science Common Room

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem "Human Robot Collaborative Assembly Planning under Uncertainty"

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 07 October, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Heriot Watt University, Earl Mountbatten Building, Heriot Watt University, EH14 4AS, United Kingdom

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering at Sabanci University will be giving a talk on Human Robot Collaborative Assembly Planning under Uncertainty at Heriot Watt University on 7th October. Abstract: For assembly planning, robots necessitate certain cognitive skills: high-level planning of actuation actions is needed to decide for their order, while geometric reasoning is needed to check their feasibility. For collaborative assembly tasks with humans, robots require further cognitive capabilities, such as commonsense reasoning, sensing, and communication skills, not only to cope with the uncertainty caused by incomplete knowledge about the humans behaviors but also to ensure safer collaborations. We introduce a formal framework for collaborative assembly planning under uncertainty that utilizes hybrid conditional planning extended with commonsense reasoning and a rich set of communication actions for collaborative tasks. We show the applicability of our approach over a furniture assembly domain, where a bi-manual Baxter robot collaborates with a human to assemble a table, with dynamic simulations and physical implementations. We also evaluate our approach experimentally in this domain with respect to quantitative and qualitative performance measures. Short Bio: Esra Erdem is an associate professor in computer science and engineering at Sabanci University. She received her Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Texas at Austin (2002), and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto and Vienna University of Technology from 2002 to 2006. Her research is in the area of artificial intelligence, in particular, the mathematical foundations of knowledge representation and reasoning, and their applications to cognitive robotics and computational biology. Professor Erdem is being hosted by Professor Subramanian Ramamoorthy

FATA Seminar: Mini-talks

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: TBC, School of Computing Science, University of Glasgow
Date: 08 October, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Vasileios Giotsas, Lancaster University
Date: 09 October, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 10 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

FATA Coffee

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: All welcome
Date: 10 October, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Computing Science Common Room

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem "Generalized Multi-Agent Pathfinding with Feasibility Checks"

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 14 October, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:00
Location: School of Computing Science, Sir Alwyn Williams Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, United Kingdom

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering at Sabanci University will be giving a FATA talk on 'Generalized Multi-Agent Pathfinding with Feasibility Checks' at the University of Glasgow on 14th October. Abstract: Multi-agent pathfinding (MAPF) aims to plan, for each agent, a route from an initial location to a goal location in an environment such that no two agents collide with each other. We study a generalized version of MAPF (GMAPF) in the context of robotics (e.g., in a factory floor), where some robots must visit some locations (e.g., to pick/deliver some items) on the way to their destinations, and no robot collides with any obstacles in the environment. We present a novel method to solve such GMAPF problems, which combines incremental computation of routes using Answer Set Programming with feasibility checks of routes using sampling-based methods to ensure that the robots can follow collision-free trajectories. We conclude with a discussion of the use of GMAPF problems as a benchmark suite for studies that integrate task planning with motion planning. Short Bio: Esra Erdem is an associate professor in computer science and engineering at Sabanci University. She received her Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Texas at Austin (2002), and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto and Vienna University of Technology from 2002 to 2006. Her research is in the area of artificial intelligence, in particular, the mathematical foundations of knowledge representation and reasoning, and their applications to cognitive robotics and computational biology. Professor Erdem is being hosted by Professor Subramanian Ramamoorth and this talk is being organised by Dr Mary Ellen Foster, University of Glasgow

SICSA DVF Talk: Generalized Multi-Agent Pathfinding with Feasibility Checks

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: Esra Erdem, Sabanci University
Date: 14 October, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

Multi-agent pathfinding (MAPF) aims to plan, for each agent, a route from an initial location to a goal location in an environment such that no two agents collide with each other. We study a generalized version of MAPF (GMAPF) in the context of robotics (e.g., in a factory floor), where some robots must visit some locations (e.g., to pick/deliver some items) on the way to their destinations, and no robot collides with any obstacles in the environment. We present a novel method to solve such GMAPF problems, which combines incremental computation of routes using Answer Set Programming with feasibility checks of routes using sampling-based methods to ensure that the robots can follow collision-free trajectories. We conclude with a discussion of the use of GMAPF problems as a benchmark suite for studies that integrate task planning with motion planning.

A General Framework for Stable Roommate Problems

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: Esra Erdem, Sabanci University, Istanbul
Date: 15 October, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

Please note change of venue to F121.

The Stable Roommate problem (SR) is characterized by the preferences of agents over other agents as roommates: each agent ranks all others in strict order of preference. A solution to SR is then a partition of the agents into pairs so that each pair shares a room, and there is no pair of agents that would block this matching (i.e., who prefers the other to their roommate in the matching). There are interesting variations of SR that are computationally hard. For instance, SRI considers incomplete preferences, Egalitarian SRI further tries to maximize the total satisfaction of preferences of all agents, and Almost SRI tries to minimize the total number of blocking pairs. We introduce a formal framework that is general enough to solve many of such variations of SR declaratively. This framework is based on Answer Set Programming (ASP) -- a rich knowledge representation and reasoning paradigm with an expressive formalism and efficient solvers.

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdem "A General Framework for Stable Roommate Problems"

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 15 October, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: School of Computing Science, Sir Alwyn Williams Building, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ, United Kingdom

SICSA DVF Professor Esra Erdam, Professor in Computer Science and Engineering at Sabanci University will be giving a FATA talk on 'A General Framework for Stable Roommate Problems' at the University of Glasgow on 15th October. Abstract: The Stable Roommate problem (SR) is characterized by the preferences of agents over other agents as roommates: each agent ranks all others in strict order of preference. A solution to SR is then a partition of the agents into pairs so that each pair shares a room, and there is no pair of agents that would block this matching (i.e., who prefers the other to their roommate in the matching). There are interesting variations of SR that are computationally hard. For instance, SRI considers incomplete preferences, Egalitarian SRI further tries to maximize the total satisfaction of preferences of all agents, and Almost SRI tries to minimize the total number of blocking pairs. We introduce a formal framework that is general enough to solve many of such variations of SR declaratively. This framework is based on Answer Set Programming (ASP) -- a rich knowledge representation and reasoning paradigm with an expressive formalism and efficient solvers. Short Bio: Esra Erdem is an associate professor in computer science and engineering at Sabanci University. She received her Ph.D. in computer sciences at the University of Texas at Austin (2002), and carried out postdoctoral research at the University of Toronto and Vienna University of Technology from 2002 to 2006. Her research is in the area of artificial intelligence, in particular, the mathematical foundations of knowledge representation and reasoning, and their applications to cognitive robotics and computational biology. Professor Erdem is being hosted by Professor Subramanian Ramamoorth and this talk is being organised by Professor David Manlove, University of Glasgow

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Gorry Fairhurst, University of Aberdeen
Date: 16 October, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 17 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

FATA Coffee

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: All welcome
Date: 17 October, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Computing Science Common Room

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Ric Glassey, KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Date: 23 October, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 24 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

FATA Coffee

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: All welcome
Date: 24 October, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Computing Science Common Room

ORGCon Scotland North 2019

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 26 October, 2019
Time: 09:00 - 16:00
Location: The Informatics Forum, Crichton Road, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

SICSA Cyber Nexus is delighted to sponsor the forthcoming Open Rights Group Conference North (ORGCon North 2019), the UK's largest digital rights conference at the Informatics Forum, University of Edinburgh on Saturday 26th October. Join us for a day of discussions, debates and action. Hear some of the world’s leading experts on data and democracy, free expression and digital privacy. ORGCon is hosted by Open Rights Group. We challenge the government’s mass surveillance programme, protect free expression online, and push for better digital privacy protections. In collaboration with SICSA Cyber Nexus (Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance) programme ORGCon Scotland will explore the social impact of technology looking at topics: - Digital privacy - Online Identity - Digital forensics - Data and Democracy - Internet of Things and ethics With a mixture of thought provoking panels and activity-based sessions you are guaranteed to come away with new skills and new perspectives. Check out this video from ORGCon held in London in July this year to get a flavour of what to expect. Attendance is free but you should register to ensure your place: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/orgcon-scotland-tickets-72209004075  

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Robbie Simpson, CERN
Date: 30 October, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 31 October, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

SICSA DemoFest 2019: Bringing Research To Life

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 04 November, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 19:00
Location: Our Dynamic Earth, 112 Holyrood Road, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

4th November 2019, Our Dynamic Earth, Edinburgh Register now! DemoFest returns to Edinburgh on 4th November for an evening of research and technology demonstrations, keynote talks and networking. DemoFest provides a perfect opportunity for private and public sector organisations to experience the innovative Computing research taking place in Scottish Universities. Our exhibitors will talk about their research, tell you why it’s important to your organisation, and demonstrate their cutting-edge technology working in real-time. The event also provides a space for you to discuss future collaborations and business opportunities with talented researchers. The 2019 event will feature: Keynote talk from Dr Zoë Webster, Director of AI and Data Economy at Innovate UK Research & Technology Showcase with over 40 research and technology demonstrations from 14 Scottish Universities Partner Exhibitions from across the Scottish digital eco-system DemoFest 2019 will focus on the following key areas: Artificial Intelligence Cyber Physical Systems Cyber Security Data Science Human-Computer Interaction Networking and Systems Theory, Modelling and Interaction Event Timetable 15:00 - 16:00 - Exhibitor Networking Session (open to exhibitors and partners only) 16:00 - 17:00 - Keynote Session 17:00 - 19:00 - Research Showcase and Refreshments 19:00 - Event Close DemoFest is organised by SICSA, in partnership with ScotlandIS Our Champion Sponsor this year is The Data Lab      

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Gianni Antichi, Queen Mary University of London
Date: 06 November, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 07 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Rik Sarkar, University of Edinburgh
Date: 13 November, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 14 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Steven Clarke, Microsoft
Date: 20 November, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 21 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Nishanth Sastry, King's College London
Date: 27 November, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 28 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Natalia Chechina, Bournemouth University
Date: 04 December, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 05 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

External Systems Seminar

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Rosa Filgueira, EPCC, University of Edinburgh
Date: 11 December, 2019
Time: 13:30 - 14:30
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

tbc

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 12 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 19 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

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