This Week’s Events

Challenges and Opportunities at the Intersection of the Computing and Social Sciences

Group: Information Retrieval (IR)
Speaker: Multiple speakers
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Location: Western Infirmary Lecture Theatre

The workshop aims to bring together social, political and computer scientists to discuss the challenges and opportunities when studying political events and campaigns especially on & through social media. Speakers include UoG's Assistant VP Des McNulty, Philip Habel (USA), Zac Green (Strathclyde) and our own Anjie Fang, who will be defending his PhD this week.

End-to-end verification using CakeML

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Magnus Myreen, Chalmers University, Sweden
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:00
Location: Sir Charles Wilson Building, Room 101A

CakeML is a functional programming language and an ecosystem of proofs
and tools built around the language. The ecosystem includes program
verification tools and a proven-correct compiler that can bootstrap
itself.

In this talk, I will introduce the CakeML project, present its
compiler, and describe how CakeML tools can be used to prove
functional correctness down to the machine code that runs on the
hardware. I will also talk about recent developments, including how we
have proved correctness of a CPU that the CakeML compiler can compile
to; and how we plan to support proofs about space usage of the
compiled programs -- thus proving that programs stay within their
stack and heap limits.

The CakeML project is a collaboration between several sites. Read more
about the project here: https://cakeml.org/

Defining interfaces between hardware and software: quality and performance

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Alastair Reid, Arm
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Sir Charles Wilson Building, Room 101A

One of the most important interfaces in a computer system is the interface between hardware and software. This talk examines two critical aspects of defining the hardware-software interface: quality and performance.

The first aspect concerns the "radical" idea of creating a single, high-quality, formal specification of microprocessors that everybody can use. This idea does not seem "radical" until you realize that standard practice is for every group to create their own version of a specification in their preferred toolchain. I will describe the challenges that lead to this behavior and how to overcome the challenges. This project lead to the creation of Arm's official formal specification of their microprocessors and to the formal validation of Arm's processors against that specification.

The second aspect concerns the tradeoff between portability and performance in the context of high performance, energy efficient, parallel systems. I will describe the challenges in balancing portability and performance and how I overcame them by defining the hardware-software interface in terms of extensions of the C language. This project played a key part in creation of a software-defined radio system capable of implementing the 4G cellphone protocol.

The Arm architecture is the largest computer architecture by volume in the world; it behooves us to ensure that the interface it describes is appropriately defined.

Towards Machine Learning Systems Design

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: Professor Neil Lawrence, Director of Machine Learning, Amazon Cambridge & Professor of ML at University of Sheffield
Date: 22 February, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Abstract: Machine learning solutions, in particular those based on deep learning methods, form an underpinning for the modern artificial intelligence revolution that has dominated popular press headlines and is having a strong influence on the wider tech agenda.

In this talk I will give an overview of where we are now with machine learning solutions, and what challenges we face both in the near and far future. These include practical application of existing algorithms in the face of the need to explain decision making, mechanisms for improving the quality and availability of data, and dealing with large unstructured datasets.

The talk will be followed by drinks and snacks. 

Biography: 

Neil Lawrence is Professor of Machine Learning at the University of Sheffield and the co-host of the podcast “Talking Machines”. He is currently exploring industry on leave of absence from Sheffield at Amazon in Cambridge, where he is a Director of Machine Learning.

He received his bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Southampton in 1994. Following a period as an field engineer on oil rigs in the North Sea he returned to academia to complete his PhD in 2000 at the Computer Lab in Cambridge University. He spent a year at Microsoft Research in Cambridge before leaving to take up a Lectureship at the University of Sheffield, where he was subsequently appointed Senior Lecturer in 2005. In January 2007 he took up a post as a Senior Research Fellow at the School of Computer Science in the University of Manchester where he worked in the Machine Learning and Optimisation research group. In August 2010 he returned to Sheffield to take up a collaborative Chair in Neuroscience and Computer Science.

 

Neil’s main research interest is machine learning through probabilistic models. He focuses on both the algorithmic side of these models and their application. He has a particular focus on applications in personalized health and computational biology, but happily dabbles in other areas such as speech, vision and graphics.

 

Neil was Associate Editor in Chief for IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (from 2011-2013) and is an Action Editor for the Journal of Machine Learning Research. He was the founding editor of the Proceedings of Machine Learning Research (2006) and is currently series editor. He was an area chair for the NIPS conference in 2005, 2006, 2012 and 2013, Workshops Chair in 2010 and Tutorials Chair in 2013. He was General Chair of AISTATS in 2010 and AISTATS Programme Chair in 2012. He was Program Chair of NIPS in 2014 and was General Chair for 2015. He is one of the founders of the DALI Meeting and Data Science Africa.

 

 

Upcoming Events

Challenges and Opportunities at the Intersection of the Computing and Social Sciences

Group: Information Retrieval (IR)
Speaker: Multiple speakers
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 17:00
Location: Western Infirmary Lecture Theatre

The workshop aims to bring together social, political and computer scientists to discuss the challenges and opportunities when studying political events and campaigns especially on & through social media. Speakers include UoG's Assistant VP Des McNulty, Philip Habel (USA), Zac Green (Strathclyde) and our own Anjie Fang, who will be defending his PhD this week.

End-to-end verification using CakeML

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Magnus Myreen, Chalmers University, Sweden
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:00
Location: Sir Charles Wilson Building, Room 101A

CakeML is a functional programming language and an ecosystem of proofs
and tools built around the language. The ecosystem includes program
verification tools and a proven-correct compiler that can bootstrap
itself.

In this talk, I will introduce the CakeML project, present its
compiler, and describe how CakeML tools can be used to prove
functional correctness down to the machine code that runs on the
hardware. I will also talk about recent developments, including how we
have proved correctness of a CPU that the CakeML compiler can compile
to; and how we plan to support proofs about space usage of the
compiled programs -- thus proving that programs stay within their
stack and heap limits.

The CakeML project is a collaboration between several sites. Read more
about the project here: https://cakeml.org/

Defining interfaces between hardware and software: quality and performance

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Alastair Reid, Arm
Date: 21 February, 2019
Time: 15:30 - 16:30
Location: Sir Charles Wilson Building, Room 101A

One of the most important interfaces in a computer system is the interface between hardware and software. This talk examines two critical aspects of defining the hardware-software interface: quality and performance.

The first aspect concerns the "radical" idea of creating a single, high-quality, formal specification of microprocessors that everybody can use. This idea does not seem "radical" until you realize that standard practice is for every group to create their own version of a specification in their preferred toolchain. I will describe the challenges that lead to this behavior and how to overcome the challenges. This project lead to the creation of Arm's official formal specification of their microprocessors and to the formal validation of Arm's processors against that specification.

The second aspect concerns the tradeoff between portability and performance in the context of high performance, energy efficient, parallel systems. I will describe the challenges in balancing portability and performance and how I overcame them by defining the hardware-software interface in terms of extensions of the C language. This project played a key part in creation of a software-defined radio system capable of implementing the 4G cellphone protocol.

The Arm architecture is the largest computer architecture by volume in the world; it behooves us to ensure that the interface it describes is appropriately defined.

Towards Machine Learning Systems Design

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: Professor Neil Lawrence, Director of Machine Learning, Amazon Cambridge & Professor of ML at University of Sheffield
Date: 22 February, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Abstract: Machine learning solutions, in particular those based on deep learning methods, form an underpinning for the modern artificial intelligence revolution that has dominated popular press headlines and is having a strong influence on the wider tech agenda.

In this talk I will give an overview of where we are now with machine learning solutions, and what challenges we face both in the near and far future. These include practical application of existing algorithms in the face of the need to explain decision making, mechanisms for improving the quality and availability of data, and dealing with large unstructured datasets.

The talk will be followed by drinks and snacks. 

Biography: 

Neil Lawrence is Professor of Machine Learning at the University of Sheffield and the co-host of the podcast “Talking Machines”. He is currently exploring industry on leave of absence from Sheffield at Amazon in Cambridge, where he is a Director of Machine Learning.

He received his bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Southampton in 1994. Following a period as an field engineer on oil rigs in the North Sea he returned to academia to complete his PhD in 2000 at the Computer Lab in Cambridge University. He spent a year at Microsoft Research in Cambridge before leaving to take up a Lectureship at the University of Sheffield, where he was subsequently appointed Senior Lecturer in 2005. In January 2007 he took up a post as a Senior Research Fellow at the School of Computer Science in the University of Manchester where he worked in the Machine Learning and Optimisation research group. In August 2010 he returned to Sheffield to take up a collaborative Chair in Neuroscience and Computer Science.

 

Neil’s main research interest is machine learning through probabilistic models. He focuses on both the algorithmic side of these models and their application. He has a particular focus on applications in personalized health and computational biology, but happily dabbles in other areas such as speech, vision and graphics.

 

Neil was Associate Editor in Chief for IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (from 2011-2013) and is an Action Editor for the Journal of Machine Learning Research. He was the founding editor of the Proceedings of Machine Learning Research (2006) and is currently series editor. He was an area chair for the NIPS conference in 2005, 2006, 2012 and 2013, Workshops Chair in 2010 and Tutorials Chair in 2013. He was General Chair of AISTATS in 2010 and AISTATS Programme Chair in 2012. He was Program Chair of NIPS in 2014 and was General Chair for 2015. He is one of the founders of the DALI Meeting and Data Science Africa.

 

 

Designing a multi-level programming language

Group: Centre for Computing Science Education (CCSE)
Speaker: Dr John O'Donnell
Date: 25 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

Many programming languages operate at a fixed level of abstraction.  Their compilers may transform the code through several levels, but those are hidden from the programmer.  This talk describes work in progress on a language that supplies medium level constructs (comparable to Pascal or C), as well as intermediate and low level constructs (which give direct access to machine registers and instructions, similar to PL360).  A program can be compiled by transforming it to lower levels, all of which are expressible within the language.  The compilation can be carried out manually as well as automatically.  A hypothesis is that the approach could enhance teaching, where it would offer a clear way to understand the semantics of a language.

The Complexity of Modular Counting Problems

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: David Richerby, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford
Date: 26 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Any decision problem has a natural counting problem associated with it: instead of asking "Is there a solution?", we can ask "How many solutions are there?"

I will discuss the complexity of counting solutions modulo some fixed integer, especially my work on counting graph homomorphisms modulo 2.
Graph homomorphisms can be seen as a generalization of graph colourings. We show that, for broad classes C of graphs, counting homomorphisms from an arbitrary input graph to a fixed graph H in C modulo 2 can either be done in polynomial time or is NP-hard, depending on the structure of H, with no problems of intermediate complexity. We conjecture that this dichotomy applies to all graphs H.

On the face of it, counting modulo 2 is the decision problem "Is the number of solutions even?" However, counting problems turn out to be a more appropriate framework in which to study these problems.
Unexpected phenomena occur: for example, Valiant discovered a restriction of 3-SAT where satisfying assignments can be counted modulo 7 in polynomial time but it is NP-hard to count them modulo 2.
Similar effects occur with graph homomorphisms.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 26 February, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Machine Learning Solutions For Marine Applications

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Andrea Coraddu, University of Strathclyde
Date: 27 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

For the maritime industry, the Information Age means the availability of apparently ever-growing amount of Data from multiple sensors present on board. These sensors are nowadays embedded in most of the main new-built ship components and enable to monitor virtually every aspect of the vessel operations. The data monitoring system could provide a variety of services: remote support; decision support system and condition-based maintenance.

Sensors deployed measure the condition of the vessels, and are continuously generating a large volume of data. These data need to be processed and analysed to produce useful insights into real-world vessel operations that can further improve safety and efficiency. Moreover, the investigation about autonomous shipping operations has taken up speed in the latest years, Autonomous Vessels and operations would require in future effective and robust real-time monitoring and decision support system based on accurate and reliable predictive algorithm.

The key point for the discussion will be the utilisation of innovative data-driven approaches for vessel monitoring including remote assistance, condition-based maintenance on primary systems and performance assessment/optimisation on vessels’ operations.

SICSA Cyber Nexus: Cyber Security in the Age of Quantum Computing

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 27 February, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 17:15
Location: The Informatics Forum, Crichton Street, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Cyber Security in the Age of Quantum Computing, organised by SICSA Cyber Nexus will be held on Wednesday 27 February at the Informatics Forum, University of Edinburgh Quantum computers and other quantum technologies develop rapidly, due to recent large scale governmental and commercial initiatives. This moves these technologies from being purely academic endeavours to the domain of real-life applications. Cyber security is one of the fields that, arguably, will be greatly affected by quantum technologies. Attacks using quantum computers would break widely used classical cryptosystems. At the same time, quantum technologies can also be used by honest parties to provide higher levels of security and efficiency. This workshop, for businesses and academics who want to learn more, will describe the changes that are coming and explore the research and innovation potential of this new area. The schedule is as follows: 13:30 - 13:55 Coffee and Registration 13:55 - 14:00 Welcoming 14:00 - 14:30 Petros Wallden, University of Edinburgh "Quantum Cyber Security: The Landscape and the Challenges" 14:30 - 15:10 Martin Albrecht, Royal Holloway "The Road to Post-Quantum Cryptography" 15:10 - 15:30 Coffee Break 15:30 - 16:10 Daniel Oi, University of Strathclyde "Space Quantum Communications" 16:10 - 16:40 Anne Marin, VeriQloud "Towards a Quantum Internet" 16:40 - 17:10 Eklham Kashefi, University of Edinburgh "Quantum Internet Applications" 17:10 - 17:30 Open Discussion (co-ordinated by panel including the speakers The organiser of this event is Petros Wallden

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 28 February, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

Title: Interaction design for emergent users - Leveraging digital technologies to solve problems of developing economies

Group: Human Computer Interaction (GIST)
Speaker: Anirudha Joshi, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Date: 28 February, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

Abstract:

In HCI courses, we learn to do user-centred design. We strive to make sure that users will find our products useful, usable and even desirable. But we typically design for the “traditional” users. For example, we may learn to use metaphors, so that users can apply their real-life experiences while using new products. But what metaphor do we use when our user will be opening her first bank account through an app? How to provide large amounts of information to someone who does not know how to search, navigate websites, or cannot read? How can one locate a contact on the phone without typing? In the Interaction Design for Indian Needs group in IIT Bombay, have been exploring design of interactive products for "emergent" users of technology. I will talk about the context of an emergent user, and how did information and communication technologies reach them. I will show examples of designs for an Indian language keyboard, a contact application, a rural enterprise project, a system to support treatment of people living with HIV, and an aid for adult literacy classes. Not all of these designs are highly successful. The technologies that I talk about might not be very new. But we learnt a lot while designing these products. Through these examples I will try explain how we design for emergent users, so that we can design for, and with them.

 

Anirudha Joshi is professor in the interaction design stream in the IDC School of Design, IIT Bombay, though currently he is on a sabbatical, visiting universities in the UK. His specialises in design of interactive products for emergent users in developing economies. He has worked in diverse domains including healthcare, literacy, Indian language text input, banking, education, industrial equipment, and FMCG packaging. Anirudha also works in the area of integrating HCI with software engineering. Anirudha is active with many HCI communities. He has played various roles in conferences including India HCI, INTERACT and CHI. He is the founding director of HCI Professionals Association of India. He represents India on IFIP TC13.  He is the Liaison for India for the ACM SIGCHI Asian Development Committee and the VP Finance of the ACM SIGCHI Executive Committee. You can find more about him here: http://www.idc.iitb.ac.in/~anirudha/aboutmeformal.htm

IDI Journal Club: paper and tutorial pitch session

Group: Deep learning reading group
Speaker: all
Date: 28 February, 2019
Time: 14:00 - 15:30
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 203 Meeting Room

This meeting will give everyone the opportunity to pitch one (or more) papers you think would be interested to discuss in this group. Proposals to give a tutorial on a topic of interest or demo the use of some new library you’ve been working with recently are also welcome. 

With the new batch of papers/ tutorials we decide on next week, Sebastian will also pass the baton of organizing this group to Adalberto, who has kindly volunteered to take over.

Student-Project-Resource Matching-Allocation Problems: Two-Sided Matching Meets Resource Allocation

Group: Formal Analysis, Theory and Algorithms (FATA)
Speaker: Anisse Ismaili, RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project (AIP), Kyushu University, Japan
Date: 05 March, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

In this work, we consider a three sided student-project-resource matching-allocation problem, in which students have preferences on projects, and projects on students. While students are many-to-one matched to projects, indivisible resources are also many-to-one allocated to projects whose capacities are thus endogenously determined by the sum of resources allocated to them. Traditionally, this problem is divided into two separate problems, e.g., (1) resources are allocated to projects based on some expectations (resource allocation problem), and (2) students are matched to projects based on the capacities determined in the previous problem (matching problem). Although both problems are well-understood, unless the expectations used in the first problem are correct, we obtain a suboptimal outcome. Thus, it is desirable to solve this problem as a whole without dividing it in two.
In the paper, we first show that finding a nonwasteful matching is FP^NP[log]-hard, and deciding whether a stable matching exists is NP^NP-complete. These results involve two new problems of independent interest: ParetoPartition, shown FP^NP[poly]-complete and strongly FP^NP[log]-hard, and \forall\exists-4-Partition, shown strongly NP^NP-complete. Then, we show that no strategyproof mechanism satisfies fairness and very weak efficiency requirements. Given this impossibility result, we develop a new strategyproof mechanism that strikes a good balance between fairness and efficiency, which is assessed by experiments.
During this FATA seminar, I will focus on the proof that finding a nonwasteful matching is FP^NP[log]-hard, involving a new fundamental problem: ParetoPartition.

This was a joint work with students Tomoaki Yamaguchi and Kentaro Yahiro, and with Prof. Makoto Yokoo.

In this work, we consider a three sided student-project-resource matching-allocation problem, in which students have preferences on projects, and projects on students. While students are many-to-one matched to projects, indivisible resources are also many-to-one allocated to projects whose capacities are thus endogenously determined by the sum of resources allocated to them. Traditionally, this problem is divided into two separate problems, e.g., (1) resources are allocated to projects based on some expectations (resource allocation problem), and (2) students are matched to projects based on the capacities determined in the previous problem (matching problem). Although both problems are well-understood, unless the expectations used in the first problem are correct, we obtain a suboptimal outcome. Thus, it is desirable to solve this problem as a whole without dividing it in two. In the paper, we first show that finding a nonwasteful matching is FP^NP[log]-hard, and deciding whether a stable matching exists is NP^NP-complete. These results involve two new problems of independent interest: ParetoPartition, shown FP^NP[poly]-complete and strongly FP^NP[log]-hard, and \forall\exists-4-Partition, shown strongly NP^NP-complete. Then, we show that no strategyproof mechanism satisfies fairness and very weak efficiency requirements. Given this impossibility result, we develop a new strategyproof mechanism that strikes a good balance between fairness and efficiency, which is assessed by experiments. During this FATA seminar, I will focus on the proof that finding a nonwasteful matching is FP^NP[log]-hard, involving a new fundamental problem: ParetoPartition.

This was a joint work with students Tomoaki Yamaguchi and Kentaro Yahiro, and with Prof. Makoto Yokoo.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 05 March, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Computational Biology Meeting

Group: Computational Biology
Speaker: Josh + 1
Date: 06 March, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

TBC

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 07 March, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

ACM SIGIR Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval (CHIIR)

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 10 March, 2019
Time: 00:00 - 00:00
Location: The University of Strathclyde, Richmond Street, University of Strathclyde, United Kingdom

SICSA is pleased to be sponsoring the ACM SIGIR Conference on Human Information Interaction and Retrieval (CHIIR) which is taking place in Glasgow from 10 - 14 March 2019 Online information influences every aspect of our lives: work, leisure and learning. As information systems become more embedded in our day-to-day experiences, it becomes increasingly important to understand how people interact with information and the consequences of those interactions. Access to information is critical to preserving democracy. Beyond designing effective and engaging information retrieval systems and interfaces, understanding how users access and use information is crucial to designing fair and ethical systems. ACM CHIIR 2019 invites submissions focused on user-centered approaches to design and evaluation of systems for information access, retrieval, and use. This includes studies of interactive retrieval systems, novel interfaces and interaction paradigms, new evaluation methods, and related areas. Alongside focused studies on specific information retrieval systems and situations, we also welcome longitudinal, real-life, and ethnographic research of contextually embedded search tasks. Topics covered include but are not limited to: Information seeking, including task-based and exploratory studies Search interfaces, including those for specialized tasks, populations and domains User-Centered Design approaches to humans interacting with information and systems Interaction techniques for information retrieval and discovery Online information seeking, including log analysis of search and browsing Modeling and simulation of information interaction Information use, including measures of use as well as broader sense-making Field and case studies relevant to understanding prerequisites for information searching, design and access User-centered evaluation methods and measures, including measures of user experience and performance, experiment and search task design, eye-tracking and physiological approaches, data analysis methods, and usability Human interaction and experience with mobile searching and services Context-aware and personalized search, including design, contextual features and analysis of information interaction Information visualization and visual analytics, including search result presentation Collaborative information seeking and social search, including social utility and network analysis for information interaction Conversational search and other types of stateful and multi-turn interactions between users and search applications Full details of the CHIIR 2019 can be found on the web-site: http://sigir.org/chiir2019/index.html

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 12 March, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 14 March, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

COMPUMATCH drop-in session

Group: Interdisciplinary Collaboration Events
Speaker: COMPUMATCH
Date: 15 March, 2019
Time: 12:30 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

All members of the university interested in forming research collaborations with colleagues in theoretical computer science are warmly invited to come and discuss their research problems.  A light buffet lunch will be provided.

Harnessing AI for a better Scotland: Industry/Academia Matchmaking Event

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 18 March, 2019
Time: 17:30 - 19:30
Location: Edinburgh Napier University, Merchiston Campus, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

SICSA AI Research Theme is sponsoring the Harnessing AI for a better Scotland: Industry/Academia Matchmaking Event taking place on Monday 18th March at Merchiston Campus, Edinburgh Napier University. How can we harness Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Scotland to ensure it provides benefit to both the economy and our society? We invite industry and academia to come together to discuss state-of-the art research and how this can be used to benefit Scottish industry and businesses for the long term. This workshop is part of the DataFest19 Fringe and is supported by the Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA) AI Theme and the Scottish Research Partnership in Engineering (SRPe). AI lies at the heart of a world driven by data. We will discuss ways to best make use of that data to enhance decision-making and improve system performance for a variety of applications with social, environmental and economic benefit. This recent wave of AI has been likened to the new industrial revolution with companies tapping into AI to enhance and develop their businesses in areas such as finance, healthcare, commerce and many more. With recent advances in computing power and data storage, capabilities that were previously impractical have become not only possible, but are now commercially viable. The evening will involve 2 minute lightning talks, speed-dating and networking with refreshments, and will open up new opportunities for Scottish universities, companies, businesses and organisations to work together to exploit and create impact around recent advances in AI. Tickets for this event are free but limited - sign up at https://tinyurl.com/y73noqex to book your ticket.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 19 March, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

Computational Biology Meeting

Group: Computational Biology
Speaker: Grimur + 1
Date: 20 March, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Lilybank Gardens, F121 Conference Room

TBC

Algorithmic Optimisations for Graph Analytics

Group: Systems Seminars
Speaker: Hans Vandierendonck, Queen’s University Belfast
Date: 20 March, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 423 Seminar Room

This talk will explore compiler optimisations for graph processing in the context of Pregel-like programming models. Graph processing is a time-consuming and challenging workload due to the size of graph data sets and the irregular memory access patterns that arise from the interconnection pattern of the graph. Key performance bottlenecks relate to random memory access patterns with poor cache locality, and conditional branches that are dependent on long-latency loads. I will present five optimisations that address one or both of these performance bottlenecks: convergence, level-asynchronous execution, deferred updates, unconditional execution and memoisation. The validity of these optimisations depends on the properties of the graph algorithms. The talk will focus on graph analytics algorithms that can be represented mathematically through sparse linear algebra. In particular, they are defined by a recurrence relation based on sparse matrix-vector multiplication and an application-specific semiring. I will infer sufficient conditions for the correctness of the optimisations based on the properties of the semiring. I will present experimental results that show the performance impact of the optimisations. 

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 21 March, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

GWiCS March meet up: PhD experience

Group: Glasgow Women in Computing Science (GWiCS)
Speaker: David Maxwell, Computing Science PhD student, University of Glasgow
Date: 21 March, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

More details about this talk coming soon. A buffet lunch will be provided at 12:00pm after to the event.

The Glasgow Women in Computing Science group (GWiCS) is open to all University of Glasgow staff and students (female / non-binary / male) from Undergraduate level to Chancellor and everywhere in-between. However, our focus is on research level CS upwards.

We hold monthly meet ups, talks and information sessions as well as providing a supportive network for new PhD students and early career researchers. Please see the main page for event information.

 

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 26 March, 2019
Time: 15:00 - 16:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 28 March, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

GWiCS April meet up: CV workshop

Group: Glasgow Women in Computing Science (GWiCS)
Speaker: Michel Steuwer, Lecturer in Computing Science, University of Glasgow
Date: 01 April, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

More details about this talk coming soon. A buffet lunch will be provided at 12:30pm prior to the event.

The Glasgow Women in Computing Science group (GWiCS) is open to all University of Glasgow staff and students (female / non-binary / male) from Undergraduate level to Chancellor and everywhere in-between. However, our focus is on research level CS upwards.

We hold monthly meet ups, talks and information sessions as well as providing a supportive network for new PhD students and early career researchers. Please see the main page for event information.

 

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 02 April, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 04 April, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 09 April, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 11 April, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 16 April, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 18 April, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

SICSA PreCHI Day

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 23 April, 2019
Time: 10:00 - 17:00
Location: The University of Dundee, Nethergate, Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom

The SICSA PreCHI day will be hosted in Dundee on 23rd April As you’ll be aware, CHI is coming to Glasgow this year and this is a great opportunity to shout about all of the world class research that we are doing within Scotland! We are still planning on holding our SICSA Pre CHI Day as a way to showcase all of the amazing work that has been accepted to CHI internally and to give you a chance to find out more about the work if you are not able to go CHI itself. We are planning on doing paper presentations and will also have an opportunity to show off posters/demos over lunch This rather informal event wants to celebrate the Scottish success at this year’s CHI conference, help creating a strong Scottish HCI community, and welcome the HCI researchers to Scotland. We expect a mixed audience, including researchers of the Scottish HCI community as well as interested students, designers, etc. The preliminary schedule for the day will follow the same as last year (as it worked perfectly!) and is below: 10:00 - 10:15 Registration & Coffee 10:15 - 10:30 Opening 10:30 - 11:30 3 x Talks 11:30 - 11:40 Break 11:40 - 12:40 3 x Talks 121:40 - 14:00 Lunch, Posters & Demos 14:00 - 15:00 3 x Talks 15:00 - 15:20 Break 15:20 - 16:20 3 x Talks 16:20 - 16:35 Wrap-Up 16:35 Posters, Demos Networking and Pub for those staying If you are planning to attend the SICSA Pre Chi Day please fill in the form here: https://goo.gl/forms/We399PMlhHmgoUBs2

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 23 April, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 25 April, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 30 April, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 02 May, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

ACM CHI 2019

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 03 May, 2019
Time: 00:00 - 00:00
Location: The Scottish Event Campus, Glasgow, Glasgow, G3 8YW, United Kingdom

SICSA is extremely pleased to be sponsoring the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems which is the premier international conference of Human-Computer Interaction. CHI – pronounced ‘kai’ – is a place where researchers and practitioners gather from across the world to discuss the latest in interactive technology. We are a multicultural community from highly diverse backgrounds who together investigate new and creative ways for people to interact. This will be the first time that CHI has taken place in the UK and it will be hosted at the Scottish Event Campus in Glasgow. Our theme is ‘Weaving the Threads of CHI’. This is reflected in our celtic knot logo, a symbol of strength and friendship. Threads are interconnected and interwoven, without clear beginning or end. We are the threads of CHI, people from different disciplines, cultures, sectors, communities, backgrounds – designers, researchers, practitioners – weaving together into one community, with the common purpose of technology that works for people and society. Full information on CHI 2019 can be found here: https://chi2019.acm.org/ Stephen Brewster and Geraldine Fitzpatrick CHI 2019 General Chairs generalchairs@chi2019.acm.org

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 07 May, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 09 May, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 14 May, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 16 May, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

GWiCS May meet up: Changing your research focus

Group: Glasgow Women in Computing Science (GWiCS)
Speaker: Ruth Hoffmann, Associate Lecturer in Computer Science, University of St Andrews
Date: 16 May, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

More details about this talk coming soon. A buffet lunch will be provided at 12:30pm prior to the event.

The Glasgow Women in Computing Science group (GWiCS) is open to all University of Glasgow staff and students (female / non-binary / male) from Undergraduate level to Chancellor and everywhere in-between. However, our focus is on research level CS upwards.

We hold monthly meet ups, talks and information sessions as well as providing a supportive network for new PhD students and early career researchers. Please see the main page for event information.

 

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: Thomas Koehler
Date: 21 May, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 23 May, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

tbd

Group: Systems Section
Speaker: S Waqar Nabi
Date: 28 May, 2019
Time: 16:00 - 17:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 30 May, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

Robotics and Autonomous Systems CDT Conference

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 03 June, 2019
Time: 01:00 - 01:00
Location: The Informatics Forum, 10 Crichton Street, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

We are pleased to be sponsoring the Robotics and Autonomous Systems CDT Conference which is taking place on Monday 3rd and Tuesday 4th June at the Informatics Forum, University of Edinburgh This event is to be the third annual student conference held jointly with the EPSRC CDTs in Bristol, Edinburgh and Oxford. To be hosted in exotic, wind-swept Edinburgh across the two universities which form the Edinburgh Centre for Robotics. Places are limited, but the event is free to attend for students and staff of the three CDTs. Lunch, coffee and conference dinner on the first night all included. Accommodation in student halls is also included, and your host institution will be billed directly. If you wish to opt out of this and organise your own accommodation, choose the appropriate "no accom" option below. A small number of places are also available for non-CDT PhD students from any UK institution (select the "Other Student" option below). These places do not come with accommodation provided. Details The conference will take place on the 3rd and 4th of June. Due to the distance, it is expected that attendees will arrive in Edinburgh on Sunday 2nd June. We intend on organising a free professional tour in the afternoon/evening for non-locals who wish to see the city (details yet to be announced). The first day of the conference, hosted in the University of Edinburgh's Informatics Forum, will consist of selected student talks and posters, a talk from a keynote speaker, and a tour of the facilities. A conference dinner will follow in the evening. The second day will be hosted at Heriot Watt University (with coach travel arranged for those in provided accommodation) and will consist of smaller workshop/tutorial events as well as opportunities to see the facilities. It will finish by 4pm to allow for travel home for those who don't want to stay a third night. Call for Submissions Attendees are encouraged to submit abstracts for inclusion in the conference. These should be 1-2 pages in length and should be uploaded to EasyChair by 20th February. Abstracts will be reviewed by the Conference Committee and selected for presentation as a poster, 15 minute talk, or both by 20th March. The authors of selected abstracts will then also be asked to provide a camera-ready version by 31st March for inclusion in conference proceedings hosted on www.edinburgh-robotics.org. The opportunity is also available to propose content for the workshops/tutorials portion of the second day. Whether you want to arrange a more in depth discussion of a special interest area or teach an important topic to newer students, we can support you with the facilities required. The process for these proposals is the same as for abstracts, and the committee will work with event organisers after they have been selected to finalise details. Feel free to get in touch with us if you'd like to discuss an idea further before then. Prizes will be on offer for presentations, posters and workshops/tutorials. More details to be confirmed later.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 06 June, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

GWiCS June meet up: Useful lessons I’ve learned in my career

Group: Glasgow Women in Computing Science (GWiCS)
Speaker: Carron Shankland, Professor in Computer Science, University of Stirling
Date: 07 June, 2019
Time: 13:00 - 14:00
Location: Sir Alwyn Williams Building, 422 Seminar Room

More details about this talk coming soon. A buffet lunch will be provided at 12:30pm prior to the event.

The Glasgow Women in Computing Science group (GWiCS) is open to all University of Glasgow staff and students (female / non-binary / male) from Undergraduate level to Chancellor and everywhere in-between. However, our focus is on research level CS upwards.

We hold monthly meet ups, talks and information sessions as well as providing a supportive network for new PhD students and early career researchers. Please see the main page for event information.

 

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 13 June, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

SICSA PhD Conference 2019

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 18 June, 2019
Time: 01:00 - 01:00
Location: University of Stirling, Pathfoot Building, University of Stirling, United Kingdom

The SICSA PhD Conference 2019 will take place on 18th & 19th June at the University of Stirling. The SICSA PhD Conference has become one of the highlights of the SICSA events calendar, bringing together Computing Science and Informatics PhD students, leading academics, and industry practitioners for 2 days of workshops, keynote presentations, poster sessions and social events. The conference is an event aimed specifically at Informatics and Computing Science PhD students and is organised each year by a hard working committee of PhD students and members of the SICSA Executive. Registration for the Conference will open in Spring 2019. If you wish to be considered to be a member of the organisation committee, please complete the short Application Form. If you are a PhD student in Informatics/Computer Science, working in a SICSA institution you are eligible to apply to be part of the committee More information on the 2019 Conference will be posted here in the near future but if you have any questions please email the SICSA Executive Team at admin@sicsa.ac.uk

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 20 June, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 27 June, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 04 July, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 11 July, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

ITiCSE Doctoral Consortium

Group: Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance (SICSA)
Speaker: SICSA Event, SICSA
Date: 13 July, 2019
Time: 01:00 - 01:00
Location: The University of Aberdeen, School of Natural and Computing Sciences, Aberdeen, United Kingdom

SICSA is pleased to be sponsoring the first Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education (ITiCSE) Doctoral Consortium (DC). The ITiCSE 2019 Doctoral Consortium provides an opportunity for doctoral candidates studying computing education to explore and develop their research interests in a workshop environment with a panel of established researchers in the field. We invite doctoral candidates to apply for this opportunity to share their work with a community of candidates in a similar situation. This is an excellent opportunity to get feedback on a research topic, or ideas on future direction from senior researchers in the field. Candidates of any seniority can apply as long as they will not have graduated before the event. For further information you can either contact Mark Zarb and Angela Siegel via iticse2019dc@easychair.org or see the ITiCSE Conference web-site https://iticse.acm.org/

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 18 July, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 25 July, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 01 August, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 08 August, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 15 August, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 22 August, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 29 August, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 05 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 12 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 19 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 26 September, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 03 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 10 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 17 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 24 October, 2019
Time: 12:00 - 13:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 31 October, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 07 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 14 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 21 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 28 November, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 05 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 12 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

RA Coffee Break

Group: School of Computing Science
Speaker: you
Date: 19 December, 2019
Time: 11:00 - 12:00
Location: Computing Science Common Room

This is a weekly coffee break for RAs in Computing to network, informally discuss issues, or simply enjoy some coffee and biscuits away from the screen.

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