Covid-19 Accommodation FAQs

Where can I find the latest Scottish Government guidance?

The Scottish Government's Coronavirus in Scotland pages have all the latest information on travel, testing and what you can and cannot do under prevailing restrictions.


Where can I find the latest guidance on travel between my home and term-time residence?

Please visit the Scottish Government's pages on domestic and international travel.


I am arriving in Glasgow/Dumfries from elsewhere, do I need to quarantine?

What you must do when you arrive in the UK depends on where you have been in the 10 days before you arrive, including any transit stops. The UK and Scottish Governments classify countries and territories as Red, Amber or Green. There are different procedures when arriving from countries within each of these risk categories. 

If you are returning directly to Scotland, check here (Scottish Government’s advice on international travel) but please remember that arrangements for England, Wales and NI may vary.

Note that countries can be moved between the red amber and green lists, possibly without little or no warning if circumstances change rapidly. Always check the up-to-date Government advice.

If you have been in a RED risk country:

Before departure:

On arrival:

  • Travel directly to your booked quarantine hotel, avoiding the use of public transport, if possible;
  • quarantine in your booked hotel for 10 days;
  • take your pre-booked covid tests on Day 2 and Day 8;
  • Take your pre-booked covid test on, or before, Day 2;
  • follow the national rules on Coronavirus in Scotland.

Please check the red, amber and green list countries page for further details.

 

If you have been in an Amber risk country:

If you’re fully vaccinated

 

You no longer need to self-isolate if you’re travelling to Scotland from an amber list country and have been fully vaccinated in one of the following countries:

  • UK (including as part of UK vaccine rollout overseas)
  • EU member states 
  • European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland)
  • Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City
  • USA

If you are not sure if the country you are travelling to/from is an amber list country please check the drop down list.

‘Fully vaccinated’ means that you’ve had your final dose of a COVID-19 vaccine through approved sources, at least 14 days before you arrive in Scotland.

Approved sources are:

  • for EU member states,  Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway,  Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City, vaccines that have been approved by European Medicines Agency (EMA). Please note that other vaccines including the Sinopharm and Sputnik V vaccines are not accepted at this time
  • for Switzerland vaccines approved by the Swiss vaccination programme
  • for the UK vaccines approved by the NHS
  • for the USA vaccines approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Before you travel to Scotland you’ll need to make sure you have a record of your vaccination to show on your journey:

  • if you have been vaccinated in Scotland, you can get a paper record of vaccination through NHS Inform
  • if you have been vaccinated in one of the European countries listed above, this record is accessed through the European Digital COVID certificate
  • if you have been vaccinated in the US, this is the CDC card. You must also normally reside in the US and provide proof of your address

You will need to  show the record of your vaccination during your journey to Scotland.

You must also:

These rules only apply to arrivals from amber list countries.

If you’ve not been fully vaccinated by approved sources you’ll need to follow the amber list rules for those who are not fully vaccinated.

If you’ve not been fully vaccinated by approved sources

You’ll need to follow the amber list rules for those who are not fully vaccinated.

If you have been in an AMBER risk country:

Before departure:

On arrival:

  • travel directly to the place where you are staying, avoiding the use of public transport, if possible;
  • quarantine in the place you are staying for 10 days;
  • take your pre-booked covid tests on Day 2 and Day 8 of your quarantine;
  • follow the national rules on Coronavirus in Scotland.

Please check the red, amber and green list countries page for further details

If you have only been in a GREEN risk country in the previous 10 days:

Before departure:

On arrival:


I am travelling from a Red list country and need to stay in a Quarantine Hotel. How is this supported financially?

Help with quarantine costs

New students

The University will cover the quarantine costs of £2,285 for you if you are joining us in September 2021 and you:

  • are domiciled in a country which remains on the UK red list following publication on 8 August 
  • and are required to undertake a period of quarantine in a quarantine managed hotel, in line with government guidelines.

Continuing students

The University will cover the quarantine costs for you if you are returning to Glasgow in September 2021 to continue:

  • An undergraduate or postgraduate research degree programme
  • A postgraduate taught degree programme which you began in academic year 2020/21 and is of more than 1 year in duration.

The University will not cover the quarantine costs if:

  • You started a 1-year postgraduate taught degree programme in September 2020, November 2020 or January 2021 and are either coming to the UK for the first time or returning to the UK
  • You travelled before August 1st 2021 and are claiming for retrospective reimbursement

How to apply

  • An application form will be made available on the UoG Helpdesk on 23 August

You must have completed academic and financial registration for academic year 2021/22 to be eligible for a reimbursement.

We strongly recommend that you open a UK bank account when you arrive in the UK. If you would like your reimbursement paid to your UK bank account, you should add your account details to your Financial Aid Account in My Student Center. Reimbursements paid to UK bank accounts take 2-3 weeks, whereas reimbursements paid to non-UK/international bank accounts can take 8-10 weeks.

If the UK government have authorised a deferred payment plan for your Managed Quarantine costs, you will still receive a reimbursement for the full amount from the University of Glasgow (if eligible) and you will be responsible for repaying the UK Government as per your instalment plan with them.


I am travelling from a country on the Amber list. UPDATED 2 August 2021

Changes to amber travel from 2 August 2021

From 4am on Monday 2 August, fully-vaccinated passengers arriving from amber list countries in EU member states, the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries, microstates of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City, and the USA do not have to quarantine or take a day 8 test upon arrival in Scotland. Arrivals will have to carry with them a form of certification to provide details of their vaccine status. For US arrivals, this proof is a CDC card showing you are fully vaccinated, along with proof of residence in the US. All arrivals from Europe must show a record of vaccination through the European Digital COVID Certificate.

Amber arrivals who have been fully vaccinated must take a pre-departure test before arrival into Scotland, alongside a PCR test on or before day 2 after arrival. 

Please check the red, amber and green list countries page for further details.

If you’ve not been fully vaccinated by approved sources

You’ll need to follow the amber list rules for those who are not fully vaccinated.

 If you’re not fully vaccinated

 If you’ve been in an amber list country in the 10 days before travelling to Scotland and have not been fully vaccinated, you must:

On arrival in Scotland you must:

If a country is not on this list, you should not assume that it is a green or red list country. Countries are only green or red if they appear on the green or red list.

We are pleased to confirm that students arriving from amber list countries and staying in University of Glasgow residences may be able to arrive at their residence up to 10 days prior to the contract start date of the 10 September at no additional accommodation cost. You must complete a pre-term accommodation request or email accom@glasgow.ac.uk to arrange this.

If you live in an amber list country, it’s important to plan your journey to Glasgow carefully. If you transit through a red list country, then it’s likely you will be eligible for quarantine measures in an official hotel, and the cost of £2,285. Therefore, please bear this in mind when planning air travel and keep an eye on the green, amber and red regulations. 


What are the new rules on International travel to Scotland after 4th October 2021?

Forthcoming changes – 4 October 2021

The traffic light system for international travel is changing. From 4 October, there will be no green or amber country lists.
A red list will remain for countries with high case numbers and variants of concern. Find out more.


I need to order day 2 and day 8 COVID-19 PCR tests. Which address should I use as I don't have my room details?

Test kits should be addressed to the reception at your residence. The kits will be with your keys for collection when you move in or they will be delivered to your room.

Cairncross House/Kelvinhaugh Street/Kelvinhaugh Gate,20 Kelvinhaugh Place, Glasgow, G3 8NH

Lister House Site Office, 22 Winton Drive,Glasgow, G12 0QA

Maclay Residences, 9 Cooperage Place, Glasgow, G3 8QP

Murano Street Student Village, Central Services Building, 13 Caithness Street, Glasgow, G20 7SB

Queen Margaret Residences/Winton Drive Flats, Common Services Building, Bellshaugh Court, Kirklee
Glasgow, G12 0PR

Student Apartments, 89 Gibson Street, Glasgow, G12 8LD

Wolfson Hall, West of Scotland Science Park, 2317 Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 0TH

Dumfries campus:

Dumfries Hall of Residence, Glencaple Road, Dumfries, DG1 4ZW

Laurieknowe Hall of Residence, 34 Laurieknowe, Dumfries, DG2 7AJ 

Brooke House, 31 Brooke Street, Dumfries, DG1 2JL


What are my responsibilities?

Students in all types of accommodation have a personal responsibility to follow the baseline measures that are part of beyond level 0 and provided for either by regulations or in guidance.  

Following appropriate national guidance on seeking a PCR test (if symptomatic or identified as a close contact), or undertaking regular LFD testing (if asymptomatic), self-isolation and contact tracing will be essential for early identification of the virus and to supress it from spreading – see link to https://www.nhsinform.scot/ for testing/guidance on testing.

Regular testing (if symptomatic or asymptomatic) and contact tracing will be essential for early identification of the virus and to enable quick self-isolation practices to supress it from spreading.

Details on how to access LFD testing in residences will be released soon.

 


How do I test regularly as recommended by the Scottish Government?

Free, fast and regular testing for people who do not have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) is available to everyone in Scotland.

Around 1 in 3 people with COVID-19 do not show symptoms, so can spread the virus to others without knowing.

Regular testing using lateral flow devices (LFDs), also known as rapid tests, helps to find positive cases in people who have no symptoms, but who are still infectious. If people who test positive self-isolate, we can break the chain of transmission and limit the spread of COVID-19.

You should take a rapid lateral flow test twice a week (every 3 or 4 days).

We will provide you with a starter box of test kits. You can collect more kits from collection points on campus. Please read the NHS Privacy Notice Summary to understand how your personal information is required and stored.


How do I get a vaccine?

UK students

If you are resident in the United Kingdom and do not currently have an appointment for the first or second dose (8-weeks after the first) of the vaccine, you can find out details on how to arrange an appointment or walk-in vaccination centres at NHS Inform.

International students

The Scottish Government has announced that international students are included in the national coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccination programme for the coming academic year (2021/22).

There will be more details about this released in due course.

The Student Information Scotland website has further information for International Students.


I am experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, what should I do?

The main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you've noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

You can check your symptoms and what actions you should take on the NHS Inform website.

The Scottish Government issued guidance to distinguish between COVID-19 symptoms and common cold and flu-like symptoms.

If you have symptoms, however mild, you should remain in your accommodation and arrange to be tested at the first possible opportunity by visiting this website: 

You should not leave your accommodation for any reason other than to attend for a test and you should minimise contact with others in your ‘household’. The definition of ‘household’ will depend upon your accommodation but would normally include those students living in the same ‘clusterflat’, or those on the same floor who share cooking or washing facilities, or both. This will have been communicated to you at check-in, but if you are unsure you can contact your residence site team for clarification. The student induction for University of Glasgow residences will also cover protocols for residents around what constitutes a household for the purposes of isolation if required. 

You should notify accom@gla.ac.uk and the local site reception that you have symptoms and that your household may be in isolation - and also let them know your test result.

Close contacts

Close contacts should book a test as soon as possible, and self-isolate while waiting for the result.

As a close contact, you can end self-isolation if you:

  • are fully vaccinated - this means you’ve received 2 doses from the NHS and have had your second dose more than 14 days ago
  • receive a negative PCR test result
  • do not have, or develop, symptoms

If you’re a close contact under 18 years and 4 months or you cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, you can only end self-isolation if you receive a negative PCR test result and you do not have, or develop, symptoms.

If you’re a close contact and you’ve tested positive for coronavirus in the last 90 days, you do not have to self-isolate or book a test if you’re fully vaccinated unless you develop new symptoms.

If you are over 18 years and 4 months old and are not fully vaccinated, you must complete 10 days of self-isolation from your last date of contact with a positive case, even if you do not have symptoms and you receive a negative test result. The reason we say 18 years and 4 months is to allow time for individuals to become fully vaccinated.

For more information and updated guidance about self-diagnosing COVID-19, accessing testing, reporting cases and advice on self-isolation you can also visit the University's Symptoms, Testing and Reporting web page.

 


Who needs to self-isolate and for how long?

Everyone who develops symptoms of COVID-19 – a new, continuous cough; fever or loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste - should isolate straight away and arrange a test via www.nhsinform.scot or, if you can’t get online, by calling 0800 028 2816.

People who live in the same household as a person with symptoms should also isolate straight away.

If the test result for the symptomatic person is negative, and they are not already isolating as a ‘close contact’ of a confirmed case, they can end isolation and return to work or school when they are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours. The rest of their household can end isolation straight away.

If the test is positive, the symptomatic person should remain in isolation until 10 days from symptom onset, or longer if certain symptoms persist. The rest of the household should self-isolate and book a PCR test. If they are a partially or non-vaccinated adult, they will be asked to self-isolate for 10 days, whether or not they have symptoms. If they are a fully-vaccinated adult, provided they return a negative PCR test result and remain asymptomatic, they may end self-isolation as a close contact. Fully vaccinated means having received both vaccine doses, with at least two weeks passing since the second dose. If they are younger than 18 years and 4 months or medically unable to get vaccinated, provided they return a negative PCR test result and remain asymptomatic, they may end self-isolation as a close contact. Guidance on how to self-isolate effectively should be followed.

Everyone who tests positive for COVID-19 will be put in touch with the local contact tracing team so that other close contacts can be identified. These close contacts will also be asked to self-isolate for 10 days from symptom onset in the symptomatic person. 

It will be important that everyone, and especially the people identified as close contacts, remain in self-isolation for the full length of time they are asked to.

A ‘close contact’ is someone who has been physically close enough to the confirmed case for a long enough period of time, that they may have had the virus transmitted to them. The risk of the virus being transmitted is higher the closer the contact, the greater the exposure to respiratory droplets (for example from coughing), and the longer the duration of the contact.

If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, you will be given specific guidance depending on your vaccination status and age.

If you have been identified by NHS contact tracers as having been in close contact with a person with a confirmed case, you will not be told who it is you have been in contact with.

If you test positive, please let the University know via reporting it on the UofG Helpdesk.

You should notify accom@gla.ac.uk and the local site reception that you have symptoms and that your household is in isolation: and also let them know your test result.

 


Can I return home whilst isolating, rather than remaining at my term-time address?

No, you should remain at your term-time address and isolate there along with other members of your ‘household’. Travelling to an alternative address risks the unnecessary spread of the virus. 


I live in Wolfson Hall (catered accommodation) – how will I receive my meals if I am self-isolating or quarantined?

During your period of self-isolation or quarantine, breakfast, lunch and dinner along with snacks will be delivered to your room by the Catering Staff.


What would happen if myself or one of my flatmates gets the virus?

Living support and site managers will be able to support you if you are required to self-isolate and will keep in touch with you on a regular basis.  Once you and your flatmates move in together your flat will be deemed to be a household. 

Everyone who develops symptoms of COVID-19 – a new, continuous cough; fever or loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste - should isolate straight away and arrange a test via www.nhsinform.scot or, if you can’t get online, by calling 0800 028 2816.

People who live in the same household as a person with symptoms should also isolate straight away.

If the test result for the symptomatic person is negative, and they are not already isolating as a ‘close contact’ of a confirmed case, they can end isolation and return to work or school when they are well enough and have not had a fever for 48 hours. The rest of their household can end isolation straight away.

If the test is positive, the symptomatic person should remain in isolation until 10 days from symptom onset, or longer if certain symptoms persist. The rest of the household should self-isolate and book a PCR test. If they are a partially or non-vaccinated adult, they will be asked to self-isolate for 10 days, whether or not they have symptoms. If they are a fully-vaccinated adult, provided they return a negative PCR test result and remain asymptomatic, they may end self-isolation as a close contact. Fully vaccinated means having received both vaccine doses, with at least two weeks passing since the second dose. If they are younger than 18 years and 4 months or medically unable to get vaccinated, provided they return a negative PCR test result and remain asymptomatic, they may end self-isolation as a close contact. Guidance on how to self-isolate effectively should be followed.

If you have been in close contact with someone who has COVID-19, you will be given specific guidance depending on your vaccination status and age.

Please see the University's pages for further advice and support options.


How do I arrange a test?

BOOKING A TEST

Without symptoms

Asymptomatic testing for students and staff colleagues is no longer available from Hunter Halls.

With symptoms

If you have a high temperature, a new continuous cough or have experienced a loss or change in your sense of taste or smell, book a PCR test.

If you require a PCR test to travel, test cost reimbursement is available.


What precautions will be taken in student accommodation to ensure student safety?

It will be a condition of occupancy that anyone taking up a tenancy will be required to comply with any guidance and advice given in relation to Covid 19. The Health and Wellbeing of all our residents and staff is paramount, and procedures to minimise risk will be implemented and strictly monitored.


How often will communal areas be cleaned?

Where cleaning services are provided within flats this will be provided on a weekly basis, there will be a strong focus on cleaning high traffic areas such as doors, corridors etc.


Where can I download the Protect Scotland app?

The Protect Scotland app from NHS Scotland’s Test and Protect is a free, mobile phone app designed to help us protect each other and reduce the spread of coronavirus.

Find out more and download the app.


What do I need to do if I am contacted by the Test & Protect Team and informed that I am a close contact of a confirmed case?

Contact tracing is part of the national Test and Protect approach to containing the virus.

If you are a close contact identified through Test and Protect, a contact tracer will, during their call advising your period of self-isolation, tell you how to book your test. If you are identified through the Protect Scotland App, you will be referred to the test booking portal to book your test. You can also get help booking your test by calling 0800 028 2816.

If you are identified as a close contact (household or non-household) of a person who has tested positive you should book your test as soon as possible.

You should notify the relevant residence site management team by email and then follow the guidance given to you by the Test & Protect Team.