Covid-19 Accommodation FAQs

Where can I find the latest Scottish Government guidance?

The Scottish Government's Coronavirus in Scotland pages have all the latest information on travel, testing and what you can and cannot do under prevailing restrictions.

Where can I find the latest guidance on travel between my home and term-time residence?

Please visit the Scottish Government's pages on domestic and international travel.

I am travelling from a country on the non-Red list (updated on 7 January 2022)

Changes for fully vaccinated travellers and those under 18:

  • You no longer need to take a pre-departure test before travelling to Scotland from abroad or self-isolate when you arrive.

Arriving in Scotland from abroad

These travel rules apply to everyone arriving in Scotland from abroad. They do not cover travel rules for people arriving in another country from Scotland.

As well as Scotland’s travel rules, you must also check the latest COVID-19 travel rules for any other country you plan to travel to.

If you live in the UK, you can check the travel rules for foreign countries on GOV.UK.

If you do not live in the UK, you should check your own government’s rules about travelling abroad and returning home before booking travel.

Travel to Scotland from within the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man or Channel Islands

These travel rules only apply if you’ve been outside the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man or Channel Islands in the 10 days before you arrive in Scotland. 

If you’re fully vaccinated

If you’re fully vaccinated, there are 3 things you must do before you arrive in Scotland:

1. Make sure that you’re able to prove you’re fully vaccinated

If you're aged 18 or over, you must be carrying proof that you're fully vaccinated when travelling to Scotland. Your proof needs to show that it's at least 14 days since you had your final dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

If you’ve been vaccinated in Scotland, you can download the NHS Scotland Vaccine Status app. You'll be able to use the NHS Scotland Vaccine Status app to prove your vaccine details. If you cannot download the app, you can get a paper record of your vaccinations from NHS Inform.

If you've been vaccinated outside Scotland

If you’ve been vaccinated in the EU, or another country using the European Digital Covid Certificateyou can use the European Digital COVID certificate as proof of your vaccine status.

If you’ve been vaccinated in the US, you can use a CDC Card, New York Excelsior Pass Plus, California Digital COVID-19 Vaccine Record or Washington State WA Verify Pass as proof of your vaccine status.

If you were not vaccinated in Scotland, the US or a country covered by the European Digital Covid certificate, check GOV.UK for what proof you’ll need from other countries

If you're not able to prove you've been vaccinated, or the vaccine you've had is not approved in the UK, you should follow the travel rules for someone who is not fully vaccinated.

Children under 18 who normally live in the UK, EU or US, or any other country with a vaccine programme that's approved in the UK, do not need to show proof of vaccination. 

2. Book a COVID-19 day 2 test

Everyone aged 11 or over needs to take a day 2 COVID-19 test after arriving in Scotland.

If you’re taking your day 2 test after 4am on Sunday 9 January, you can choose to take either a PCR or lateral flow test.

Buy your day 2 PCR or lateral flow test now.

If you take a day 2 PCR test and the result is positive, you'll need to follow the current rules for self-isolating in Scotland.

If you take a day 2 lateral flow test and the result is positive, you’ll need to take a free PCR test as soon as possible to confirm your positive result.

You can take your day 2 PCR or lateral flow test on or before day 2. The day you arrive in Scotland is day 0.

Children under 18

Children aged 11 to 17 taking their day 2 test after 4am on Sunday 9 January can take either a PCR or lateral flow test. 

3. Complete a Passenger Locator Form on gov.uk

To be able to complete your form, you must have these details:

  • your COVID-19 day 2 test booking reference number
  • your flight details
  • the address you’re staying at in Scotland

Each adult must complete a Passenger Locator Form. Children travelling with an adult must be included on an adult's form.

If you're not fully vaccinated 

If you’re not fully vaccinated, you must:

On arrival in Scotland you must:

Exemptions

If you’re part of a current COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial, or you have been in the past, you may count as fully vaccinated. This covers phase 2 and phase 3 trials in a World Health Organisation Stringent Regulatory Authority country or trials given by the European Medicines Agency. If you count as fully vaccinated because of a clinical trial, you must be able to provide proof that you are or were part of a clinical trial when travelling to Scotland.

What ‘fully vaccinated’ means

If you’ve had the Oxford/AstraZeneca, Pfizer BioNTech or Moderna, Sinopharm Beijing, Sinovac or Covaxin vaccines

To count as fully vaccinated, you must have had your second dose of one of these vaccines:

If you’ve only had one dose, you must follow the rules for someone who has not been fully vaccinated.

Formulations of these vaccines, such as AstraZeneca Covishield, AstraZeneca Vaxzevria and Moderna Takeda, also count as approved vaccines.

You can also:

  • mix 2 different types of an approved vaccine, for example Oxford/AstraZeneca and Moderna
  • have your 2 vaccinations under 2 different approved programmes, such as in Australia and Japan, the UK and USA or France and Canada

If you live in Scotland or England and you're unable to be vaccinated for medical reasons - you must provide an NHS COVID Pass, secure medical exemption certificate or Department of Health and Social Care confirmation letter as proof.

If you’ve had the Janssen vaccine – single dose vaccine

You must have had your single dose of the Janssen vaccine:

Other vaccines

If you've not been vaccinated with one of the vaccines mentioned on this page, you need to check GOV.UK to check whether your vaccine is approved in the UK.

If you've not been vaccinated with an approved vaccine, you'll need to follow the rules for someone who is not fully vaccinated if you're travelling to Scotland. 

 

I am travelling from a Red list country and need to stay in a Quarantine Hotel. How is this supported financially?

Please visit the University's Quarantine page for full details of eligibility and application process

 

What are the new rules on International travel to Scotland from October 2021?

The traffic light system for international travel is changing. From 4 October 2021, there will be no green or amber country lists.

A red list will remain for countries with high case numbers and variants of concern. Find out more.

I need to order day 2 and day 8 COVID-19 PCR tests. Which address should I use as I don't have my room details?

Test kits should be addressed to the reception at your residence. The kits will be with your keys for collection when you move in or they will be delivered to your room.

Cairncross House/Kelvinhaugh Street/Kelvinhaugh Gate,20 Kelvinhaugh Place, Glasgow, G3 8NH

Lister House Site Office, 22 Winton Drive,Glasgow, G12 0QA

Maclay Residences, 9 Cooperage Place, Glasgow, G3 8QP

Murano Street Student Village, Central Services Building, 13 Caithness Street, Glasgow, G20 7SB

Queen Margaret Residences/Winton Drive Flats, Common Services Building, Bellshaugh Court, Kirklee
Glasgow, G12 0PR

Student Apartments, 89 Gibson Street, Glasgow, G12 8LD

Wolfson Hall, West of Scotland Science Park, 2317 Maryhill Road, Glasgow, G20 0TH

Dumfries campus:

Dumfries Hall of Residence, Glencaple Road, Dumfries, DG1 4ZW

Laurieknowe Hall of Residence, 34 Laurieknowe, Dumfries, DG2 7AJ 

Brooke House, 31 Brooke Street, Dumfries, DG1 2JL

What are my responsibilities?

To help protect yourself and others:

Staff and students may collect LFD tests from the following campus locations:

  • Main campus [Gilmorehill], Fraser Building Level 1 
  • Garscube, Gatehouse 
  • Dumfries, School Office 

 

 

How do I test regularly as recommended by the Scottish Government?

Free, fast and regular testing for people who do not have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) is available to everyone in Scotland.

Around 1 in 3 people with COVID-19 do not show symptoms, so can spread the virus to others without knowing.

Regular testing using lateral flow devices (LFDs), also known as rapid tests, helps to find positive cases in people who have no symptoms, but who are still infectious. If people who test positive self-isolate, we can break the chain of transmission and limit the spread of COVID-19.

The Scottish Government advises everyone to test regularly and before meeting with people from other households. The University asks all colleagues and students to take a lateral flow test before travelling to work, study or to events on our campuses. You can access free lateral flow testing kits from pick-up points on our campuses, as well as many pharmacies or you can also order them online.

Please read the NHS Privacy Notice Summary to understand how your personal information is required and stored.

How do I get a vaccine or prove my vaccine status?

NHS VACCINATION CLINICS

Also see a map view of vaccination clinic locations.

NHS Scotland Covid Status App

You can use this to prove you have been vaccinated against coronavirus. The App will be needed to enter some events and venues from Friday 1 October, and for overseas travel.

Register with a GP

The only way the NHS can record your vaccination history is if you are registered with a GP. You can register after your first vaccination, but you must register before your second vaccination. The NHS cannot link your vaccination history if you do not register,. This may cause problems in the future if you want to travel or if restrictions are placed on accessing certain facilities without proof of being fully vaccinated.

International students

If you have received a first vaccine that isn’t available in the UK, but want to get a second vaccination here, the most similar alternative will be offered to you by NHS staff. Please bring any information about your first vaccination to your appointment.

If you received 2 vaccinations before arriving in the UK, you may be eligible for a third vaccination depending on the vaccine type [see Vaccine Interchangeability Guidance (Appendix 1)]

Students on an overseas placement when your second vaccination is due, should contact the health service in the country where you will be resident at the time.

Vaccination status

We strongly encourage you to get two vaccinations, but this is not required to access any facilities on campus. This approach is informed by Scottish Government public health policy and may be subject to change.

If you have had 2 vaccinations in the UK, we do not expect you will need another at this time. The NHS will begin a booster vaccination programme in the autumn for the most clinically vulnerable members of society.

I am experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, what should I do?

The main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a loss or change to your sense of smell or taste – this means you've noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

If you have symptoms, you should self-isolate immediately and book a PCR test. If you test positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date your symptoms started.

If you've had a positive PCR or LFD test result but no symptoms, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your test. You may go on to develop symptoms over the next few days. If you develop any of the main symptoms of coronavirus and you are concerned, or your symptoms are worsening, contact 111 or speak to your GP. In an emergency dial 999.

You should notify accom@gla.ac.uk and the local site reception that you have symptoms and that your household may be in isolation - and also let them know your test result.

You may still have a cough or loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste for several weeks. People with symptoms are very unlikely to infect others after the 10th day of illness. Once you have completed your 10 day self-isolation, you can return to your usual activities as long as you haven't had a high temperature in 48 hours or needed medicine to control a fever in the last 48 hours. You must continue to follow the Scottish Government’s coronavirus advice.

You should not leave your accommodation for any reason other than to attend for a test and you should minimise contact with others in your ‘household’. The definition of ‘household’ will depend upon your accommodation but would normally include those students living in the same ‘clusterflat’, or those on the same floor who share cooking or washing facilities, or both. This will have been communicated to you at check-in, but if you are unsure you can contact your residence site team for clarification. The student induction for University of Glasgow residences will also cover protocols for residents around what constitutes a household for the purposes of isolation if required. 

Ending self-isolation early - UPDATED 6 January 2022

You may be able to end self-isolation early if you have 2 consecutive negative LFD test results from day 6 onwards, taken 24 hours apart. For example, a negative LFD test result on day 6 and 7, day 7 and 8, or day 8 and 9. To be able to end self-isolation, you should also make sure you:

  • have not had a high temperature in the last 48 hours
  • follow the guidance for staying safe when you've ended self-isolation

For more information and updated guidance about self-diagnosing COVID-19, accessing testing, reporting cases and advice on self-isolation you can also visit the University's Symptoms, Testing and Reporting web page.

 

Who needs to self-isolate and for how long? UPDATED 6 January 2022

If you think you have COVID-19 symptoms you should self-isolate immediately and take a PCR test. 

Self-isolation if you're a close contact

You're a close contact if you:

  • live with someone who has tested positive – for example you sleep in the same home or live in shared accommodation like university halls
  • have spent 8 hours or more in the home of the person who has tested positive during their infectious period – for example a sleepover
  • are a cleaner (not using PPE) who cleans the home of the person who has tested positive, even if you did not spend time with them
  • have had face-to-face contact less than 1 metre apart from the person who has tested positive for any length of time
  • have had any contact less than 1 metre apart from the person who tested positive for 1 minute or longer
  • have been within 2 metres of the person who tested positive for more than 15 minutes
  • car-shared with the person who tested positive

The infectious period is any time from 2 days before any one of the three main symptoms start, and up to 10 days after. If the person who tested positive does not have symptoms, their close contacts are counted from 2 days before the date of their positive test and up to 10 days after.

Close contacts who are fully vaccinated

If you're a close contact who is fully vaccinated, you can take daily LFD tests instead of self-isolating. Fully vaccinated means you've received 2 doses of an approved vaccine (or 3 doses if you have a severely weakened immune system), plus your booster dose at least 14 days before you last saw the person who tested positive. If you live with the person who tested positive, the 14 days is counted from the day their symptoms started, or 14 days before they tested positive if they don't have symptoms. The daily LFD tests should be taken for 7 days in a row or until the end of your 10 day self-isolation period, whichever is soonest.

If any of your LFD tests are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your positive test result. You do not need to book a follow-up PCR test to confirm your positive LFD result.

Close contacts who are not fully vaccinated

If you're a close contact who is not fully vaccinated, you should self-isolate for 10 days and book a PCR test. Even if your test result is negative, you should complete the 10 day self-isolation.

If you've had a positive PCR test result in the last 90 days, you do not need to book another PCR test unless you develop new symptoms.

If you cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, you should follow the rules for close contacts who are fully vaccinated.

Close contacts aged under 18 years and 4 months

Close contacts aged under 18 years and 4 months can take daily LFD tests instead of self-isolating. The daily LFD tests should be taken for 7 days in a row or until the end of your 10 day self-isolation period, whichever is soonest.

If any of your LFD tests are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your positive test result. You do not need to book a follow-up PCR test to confirm your positive LFD result.

Find out how to book LFD and PCR tests.

Follow the guidance on self-isolating.

If you have been identified by NHS contact tracers as having been in close contact with a person with a confirmed case, you will not be told who it is you have been in contact with.

If you test positive, please let the University know via reporting it on the UofG Helpdesk.

You should notify accom@gla.ac.uk and the local site reception that you have symptoms and that your household is in isolation: and also let them know your test result.

 

Can I return home whilst isolating, rather than remaining at my term-time address?

No, you should remain at your term-time address and isolate there along with other members of your ‘household’. Travelling to an alternative address risks the unnecessary spread of the virus. 

I live in Wolfson Hall (catered accommodation) – how will I receive my meals if I am self-isolating?

During your period of self-isolation or quarantine, breakfast, lunch and dinner along with snacks will be delivered to your room by the Catering Staff.

What would happen if myself or one of my flatmates gets the virus?

Everyone who develops symptoms of COVID-19 – a new, continuous cough; fever or loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste - should isolate straight away and arrange a test via www.nhsinform.scot or, if you can’t get online, by calling 0800 028 2816.

It’s very important that you stay at home (self-isolate) if:

  • you have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19)
  • you've had a positive lateral flow device (LFD) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result
  • you're over 18 years and 4 months and not fully vaccinated and someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms but has not yet been tested or received their test result
  • you’re a close contact of someone who has had a positive LFD or PCR test result and you are over 18 years and 4 months and not fully vaccinated

Household isolation, when advised, will help to control the spread of the virus.

Self-isolation if you have coronavirus

If you have symptoms, you should self-isolate immediately and book a PCR test. If you test positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date your symptoms started.

If you've had a positive PCR or LFD test result but no symptoms, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your test. You may go on to develop symptoms over the next few days. If you develop any of the main symptoms of coronavirus and you are concerned, or your symptoms are worsening, contact 111 or speak to your GP. In an emergency dial 999.

You may still have a cough or loss of, or change in, sense of smell or taste for several weeks. People with symptoms are very unlikely to infect others after the 10th day of illness. Once you have completed your 10 day self-isolation, you can return to your usual activities as long as you haven't had a high temperature in 48 hours or needed medicine to control a fever in the last 48 hours. You must continue to follow the Scottish Government’s coronavirus advice.

Ending self-isolation early

You may be able to end self-isolation early if you have 2 consecutive negative LFD test results from day 6 onwards, taken 24 hours apart. For example, a negative LFD test result on day 6 and 7, day 7 and 8, or day 8 and 9. To be able to end self-isolation, you should also make sure you:

  • have not had a high temperature in the last 48 hours
  • follow the guidance for staying safe when you've ended self-isolation

Book a PCR test

Self-isolation if you're a close contact

You're a close contact if you:

  • live with someone who has tested positive – for example you sleep in the same home or live in shared accommodation like university halls
  • have spent 8 hours or more in the home of the person who has tested positive during their infectious period – for example a sleepover
  • are a cleaner (not using PPE) who cleans the home of the person who has tested positive, even if you did not spend time with them
  • have had face-to-face contact less than 1 metre apart from the person who has tested positive for any length of time
  • have had any contact less than 1 metre apart from the person who tested positive for 1 minute or longer
  • have been within 2 metres of the person who tested positive for more than 15 minutes
  • car-shared with the person who tested positive

The infectious period is any time from 2 days before any one of the three main symptoms start, and up to 10 days after. If the person who tested positive does not have symptoms, their close contacts are counted from 2 days before the date of their positive test and up to 10 days after.

Close contacts who are fully vaccinated

If you're a close contact who is fully vaccinated, you can take daily LFD tests instead of self-isolating. Fully vaccinated means you've received 2 doses of an approved vaccine (or 3 doses if you have a severely weakened immune system), plus your booster dose at least 14 days before you last saw the person who tested positive. If you live with the person who tested positive, the 14 days is counted from the day their symptoms started, or 14 days before they tested positive if they don't have symptoms. The daily LFD tests should be taken for 7 days in a row or until the end of your 10 day self-isolation period, whichever is soonest.

If any of your LFD tests are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your positive test result. You do not need to book a follow-up PCR test to confirm your positive LFD result.

Close contacts who are not fully vaccinated

If you're a close contact who is not fully vaccinated, you should self-isolate for 10 days and book a PCR test. Even if your test result is negative, you should complete the 10 day self-isolation.

If you've had a positive PCR test result in the last 90 days, you do not need to book another PCR test unless you develop new symptoms.

If you cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons, you should follow the rules for close contacts who are fully vaccinated.

Close contacts aged under 18 years and 4 months

Close contacts aged under 18 years and 4 months can take daily LFD tests instead of self-isolating. The daily LFD tests should be taken for 7 days in a row or until the end of your 10 day self-isolation period, whichever is soonest.

If any of your LFD tests are positive, you should self-isolate for 10 days from the date of your positive test result. You do not need to book a follow-up PCR test to confirm your positive LFD result.

Staying safe if you’ve ended self-isolation

If you’re someone who can end self-isolation, you should:

  • limit close contact with other people outside your household, especially in enclosed spaces, until 10 days after your contact with the positive case
  • wear a face covering in enclosed spaces and where you cannot maintain physical distancing
  • limit contact with anyone who is at highest risk until 10 days after your contact with the positive case
  • not visit people in care homes, hospitals, prisons or other detention centres until 10 days after your contact with the positive case, unless essential and agreed with staff in advance
  • continue to take part in twice weekly lateral flow device (LFD) testing after the 10 days

Living support and site managers will be able to support you if you are required to self-isolate and will keep in touch with you on a regular basis.  Once you and your flatmates move in together your flat will be deemed to be a household. 

Please see the University's pages for further advice and support options.

How do I arrange a test?

Testing is part of the national Test and Protect approach to containing coronavirus (COVID-19).

Testing is available to people with and without symptoms. It can be carried out at home, or at one of the many coronavirus testing centres across Scotland.

You can get a test for:

  • yourself
  • someone you care for
  • a child in your care

Types of coronavirus test

The 2 main coronavirus tests are:

  • polymerase chain reaction (PCR) – used mainly for people with symptoms
  • lateral flow device (LFD) – used for people who do not have symptoms

The coronavirus test you should take depends on why you’re getting tested and whether you have symptoms.

If you have sight loss, you can access information about support with coronavirus testing at eyes.scot

PCR tests

You must take a PCR test if you have any one of the three symptoms of coronavirus. These are:

  • a high temperature or fever
  • a new continuous cough
  • a loss of, or change in sense of smell or taste

A new, continuous cough means coughing for longer than an hour, or three or more coughing episodes in 24 hours. If you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual.

Priority testing

If you’re an essential worker from the list on the Scottish Government website and have symptoms of coronavirus, you are prioritised to get a PCR test during periods when it's really busy.

You are also prioritised for getting a PCR test if you:

If you are on the highest risk list or are eligible for new coronavirus treatments, you should say you are an essential worker to get a priority PCR test.

If you are not prioritised for a PCR test, you may have to wait a little bit longer than you would have before Omicron to get a test. New slots become available throughout the day so keep trying to book.

 If you have coronavirus symptoms you must self-isolate before your test and while waiting for your results.

 Find out how to do a PCR test at home and get advice on your test result

A PCR test involves taking a swab of the throat and nose. PCR tests are processed in a laboratory, and are a reliable way to detect the genetic material of a virus.

You’ll normally receive your PCR test result within 48 hours.

You should also book a PCR test if:

  • you’re a close contact who isn’t fully vaccinated
  • you're self-isolating and intend to apply for the self-isolation grant
  • you’re in a high risk group prioritised for coronavirus treatments and have had a positive LFD test result
  • you’ve been asked to get a test by your local council, health protection team or healthcare professional
  • you’ve had 2 or more void LFD results

What does fully vaccinated mean?

A close contact who is fully vaccinated means means you've received 2 doses of an approved vaccine (or 3 doses if you have a severely weakened immune system), plus your booster dose at least 14 days before you last saw the person who tested positive. If you live with the person who tested positive, the 14 days is counted from the day their symptoms started, or 14 days before they tested positive if they don't have symptoms.

LFD tests

LFD (lateral flow device) tests are self-tests for people who do not have coronavirus symptoms.

LFD tests:

  • are simple to use
  • give a result in 15 to 30 minutes
  • can be taken at home, or at an asymptomatic test site
  • help find positive cases in people who are infectious but don’t have symptoms

Everyone in Scotland is encouraged to take this type of test twice a week. You should also take an LFD test before you socialise or travel in Scotland. In some situations, you can end self-isolation early if your LFD test result is negative.

Read further information about the rules for ending self-isolation early.

Your LFD test is not complete until you report your result, either online or by phone, and receive a result confirmation notification. It’s very important that you report your result so your contacts can be traced. This helps to prevent the spread of coronavirus in the community.

If you receive a positive LFD test result, you must report your result and self-isolate immediately.

Find out how to do an LFD test at home and get advice on your test result

Repeat PCR testing

Repeating a PCR test within 90 days of a positive result is not recommended for the general public, unless you develop new symptoms. This is because while you may no longer be infectious, a repeated PCR test can detect fragments of coronavirus genetic material that have not yet left your system. This means you can still get a positive test result several weeks after you have had coronavirus and are no longer infectious.

It’s not yet known how long immunity will last following infection. If you recover from coronavirus and later develop new symptoms, you must:

What precautions will be taken in student accommodation to ensure student safety?

It will be a condition of occupancy that anyone taking up a tenancy will be required to comply with any guidance and advice given in relation to Covid 19. The Health and Wellbeing of all our residents and staff is paramount, and procedures to minimise risk will be implemented and strictly monitored.

How often will communal areas be cleaned?

Where cleaning services are provided within flats this will be provided on a weekly basis, there will be a strong focus on cleaning high traffic areas such as doors, corridors etc.

Where can I download the Protect Scotland app?

The Protect Scotland app from NHS Scotland’s Test and Protect is a free, mobile phone app designed to help us protect each other and reduce the spread of coronavirus.

Find out more and download the app.

What do I need to do if I am contacted by the Test & Protect Team and informed that I am a close contact of a confirmed case?

Contact tracing is part of the national Test and Protect approach to containing the virus.

If you are a close contact identified through Test and Protect, a contact tracer will, during their call advising your period of self-isolation, tell you how to book your test. If you are identified through the Protect Scotland App, you will be referred to the test booking portal to book your test. You can also get help booking your test by calling 0800 028 2816.

If you are identified as a close contact (household or non-household) of a person who has tested positive you should book your test as soon as possible.

You should notify the relevant residence site management team by email and then follow the guidance given to you by the Test & Protect Team.

For further details including videos to explain the process please visit this NHSInform webpage.