Dr Adrian Florea

  • Lecturer (Central & East European Studies)

Biography

I joined the University of Glasgow (School of Social and Political Sciences) in July 2015. Previously, I taught at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, Elon University (North Carolina), and Oberlin College (Ohio).

Education

  • Ph.D., Indiana University, Political Science, 2014
  • M.A., Iowa State University, Political Science and Applied Linguistics, 2007
  • B.A. University of Bucharest, American Studies, 2003

Personal website: http://aflorea.weebly.com/

Follow me on Twitter: @adrianflorea13


Research interests

Main research interests:

  • Civil war and ethnic conflict
  • Secessionism
  • Rebel governance
  • Violence and political contention
  • State (un)making
  • International security
  • Research methods

Ongoing projects

I am currently engaged in three large projects. The first investigates the survival and disappearance of de facto states - polities, like Abkhazia, Northern Cyprus, or Western Sahara, which display many statelike characteristics except for international legal sovereignty. The second analyses the variation in governance/state-building activities conducted by rebel organisations. The third examines the impact of criminal activities undertaken by insurgents on conflict processes.


Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2014 | 2012 | 2007
Number of items: 9.

2020

Florea, A. (2020) Rebel governance in de facto states. European Journal of International Relations, (Accepted for Publication)

2019

Lee, M. J., Florea, A. and Blarel, N. (2019) Opening the black box of finance: north-south investment, political risk, and U.S. military intervention. Political Studies, 67(4), pp. 872-894. (doi: 10.1177/0032321718813570)

2018

Florea, A. (2018) Authority contestation during and after civil war. Perspectives on Politics, 16(1), pp. 149-155. (doi: 10.1017/S1537592717004030)

Florea, A. (2018) Spatial rivalry and coups against dictators. Security Studies, 27(1), pp. 1-26. (doi: 10.1080/09636412.2017.1360072)

2017

Florea, A. (2017) De facto states: survival and disappearance (1945-2011). International Studies Quarterly, 61(2), pp. 337-351. (doi: 10.1093/isq/sqw049)

Florea, A. (2017) Theories of civil war onset: promises and pitfalls. In: Thompson, W. (ed.) The Oxford Encyclopedia of Empirical International Relations Theory [online]. Oxford University Press. (doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.325)

2014

Florea, A. (2014) De facto states in international politics (1945–2011): a new data set. International Interactions, 40(5), pp. 788-811. (doi: 10.1080/03050629.2014.915543)

2012

Florea, A. (2012) Where do we go from here? Conceptual, theoretical, and methodological gaps in the Large-N civil war research program. International Studies Review, 14(1), pp. 78-98. (doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2486.2012.01102.x)

2007

Florea, A. (2007) Post cold war U.S. security assistance to Romania and the problem of the double security guarantee. In: Brooks, M. G. (ed.) Security Assistance: U.S. and International Historical Perspectives. Combat Studies Institute Press: Kansas, pp. 545-565.

This list was generated on Thu Apr 2 15:37:59 2020 BST.
Number of items: 9.

Articles

Florea, A. (2020) Rebel governance in de facto states. European Journal of International Relations, (Accepted for Publication)

Lee, M. J., Florea, A. and Blarel, N. (2019) Opening the black box of finance: north-south investment, political risk, and U.S. military intervention. Political Studies, 67(4), pp. 872-894. (doi: 10.1177/0032321718813570)

Florea, A. (2018) Authority contestation during and after civil war. Perspectives on Politics, 16(1), pp. 149-155. (doi: 10.1017/S1537592717004030)

Florea, A. (2018) Spatial rivalry and coups against dictators. Security Studies, 27(1), pp. 1-26. (doi: 10.1080/09636412.2017.1360072)

Florea, A. (2017) De facto states: survival and disappearance (1945-2011). International Studies Quarterly, 61(2), pp. 337-351. (doi: 10.1093/isq/sqw049)

Florea, A. (2014) De facto states in international politics (1945–2011): a new data set. International Interactions, 40(5), pp. 788-811. (doi: 10.1080/03050629.2014.915543)

Florea, A. (2012) Where do we go from here? Conceptual, theoretical, and methodological gaps in the Large-N civil war research program. International Studies Review, 14(1), pp. 78-98. (doi: 10.1111/j.1468-2486.2012.01102.x)

Book Sections

Florea, A. (2017) Theories of civil war onset: promises and pitfalls. In: Thompson, W. (ed.) The Oxford Encyclopedia of Empirical International Relations Theory [online]. Oxford University Press. (doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.325)

Florea, A. (2007) Post cold war U.S. security assistance to Romania and the problem of the double security guarantee. In: Brooks, M. G. (ed.) Security Assistance: U.S. and International Historical Perspectives. Combat Studies Institute Press: Kansas, pp. 545-565.

This list was generated on Thu Apr 2 15:37:59 2020 BST.

Grants

Recent grants

  • Dynamics of Nonstate Governance in Kosovo and Northern Cyprus: British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grant (January 2018-March 2019)
  • De Facto States in International Politics (2012-2015): The Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Research Incentive Grant (April 2017-April 2018) 
  • Erasmus+ Staff Mobility: University of Prishtina, Kosovo (28 Oct - 5 Nov 2017)
  • Protests in Central and Eastern Europe: Principal's Early Career Mobility Grant, University of Glasgow (May 2017)

Supervision

I am interested in supervising students in the following areas:

  • Civil war and ethnic conflict
  • Secessionism
  • De facto states
  • Rebel governance 
  • Rebel diplomacy
  • Violence and political contention
  • Behaviour of armed nonstate actors

Current Ph.D. supervision

  • Investigating the Dynamics of Nonstate Actor Rivalry in the Middle East, 1993-2017, Stephen R. Powell (2017-2020), Glasgow Q-Step Ph.D. Fellowship
  • Winning the Peace: Structural Challenges to the Demobilisation of Insurgent Groups, Daniel O. Shaw (2018-2022), ESRC Ph.D. Fellowship
  • Political Stability in the Aftermath of Rebel Victories, Enrique W. Young (2018-2022), ESRC Ph.D. Fellowship

Additional information

Other roles