Dr Joanna Szostek

  • Lecturer in Political Communication (Politics)

Biography

I joined the University of Glasgow as lecturer in Political Communication in September 2018.
 
My research interests centre on the role of mass media in relations between states, particularly in the post-Soviet region. Before moving to Glasgow I completed a three-year research project to investigate and explain the reception of competing political narratives among audiences in Ukraine. The project was funded by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie postdoctoral fellowship from the European Commission. It included an 18-month secondment to Kyiv Mohyla Academy in Ukraine and a five-month secondment to the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Results from that project are published in leading international journals, including Perspectives on Politics and The International Journal of Press/Politics.
 
From 2019 I am starting to work on a new research project investigating why levels of engagement with local, national and foreign/transnational media vary within and across ‘peripheral’ regions of Ukraine. The project, which is funded by the British Academy, is intended to shed light on how media use among ‘peripheral’ audiences can undermine and/or benefit state security, broadly defined.
 
I hold a doctorate in Politics from the University of Oxford. My professional experience includes several years at the BBC and many years of living and working in Russia and Ukraine. I am currently an associate fellow of the Russia and Eurasia Programme at Chatham House, The Royal Institute of International Affairs.

Research interests

  • Political communication
  • Strategic narratives
  • Media as a (re)source of international influence
  • Media and civil society in unconsolidated democracies
  • Politics of Russia, Ukraine and the post-Soviet region
  • Russian foreign policy

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014
Number of items: 18.

2020

Szostek, J. (2020) What happens to public diplomacy during information war? Critical reflections on the conceptual framing of international communication. International Journal of Communication, 14, pp. 2728-2748.

2019

Szostek, J. (2019) Losing Pravda: ethics and the press in post-truth Russia. Russian Journal of Communication, 11(1), pp. 88-90. (doi: 10.1080/19409419.2018.1564356)[Book Review]

2018

Szostek, J. (2018) Nothing is true? The credibility of news and conflicting narratives during “Information War” in Ukraine. International Journal of Press/Politics, 23(1), pp. 116-135. (doi: 10.1177/1940161217743258)

Szostek, J. (2018) The mass media and Russia’s “Sphere of Interests”: mechanisms of regional hegemony in Belarus and Ukraine. Geopolitics, 23(2), pp. 307-329. (doi: 10.1080/14650045.2017.1402298)

Szostek, J. (2018) News media repertoires and strategic narrative reception: A paradox of dis/belief in authoritarian Russia. New Media and Society, 20(1), pp. 68-87. (doi: 10.1177/1461444816656638)

2017

Szostek, J. (2017) Revolution in progress? Continuity and change in Ukrainian politics. East European Politics and Societies,

O'Loughlin, B., Szostek, J. and Vaccari, C. (2017) Written evidence submitted by New Political Communication Unit - Royal Holloway, University of London (FNW0066). Documentation. HMSO, London.

Szostek, J. (2017) News consumption and anti-Western narratives in Russia: a case study of university students. Europe-Asia Studies, 69(2), pp. 284-302. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2016.1274019)

Szostek, J. (2017) Defence and promotion of desired state identity in Russia’s strategic narrative. Geopolitics, 22(3), pp. 571-593. (doi: 10.1080/14650045.2016.1214910)

Szostek, J. (2017) Popular geopolitics in Russia and post-Soviet Eastern Europe. Europe-Asia Studies, 69(2), pp. 195-201. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2017.1288861)

Szostek, J. (2017) The power and limits of Russia’s strategic narrative in Ukraine: the role of linkage. Perspectives on Politics, 15(2), pp. 379-395. (doi: 10.1017/S153759271700007X)

2016

Szostek, J. (2016) Interdisciplinary research workshop ‘Popular geopolitics in Russia and post-Soviet Eastern Europe’, 19–20 February 2015, University College London, London, UK. Russian Journal of Communication, 8(1), pp. 96-98. (doi: 10.1080/19409419.2015.1055181)

Szostek, J. (2016) The power of detraction: Belarusion reporting of Russian social problems during "information war". Zhurnal issledovaniĭ sot︠s︡ialʹnoĭ politiki = Journal of Social Policy Studies, 14(1), pp. 99-112.

2015

Szostek, J. (2015) Russian influence on news media in Belarus. Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 48(2-3), pp. 123-135. (doi: 10.1016/j.postcomstud.2015.06.007)

Szostek, J. and Hutchings, S. (2015) Dominant narratives in Russian political and media discourse during the Ukraine crisis. In: Pikulicka-Wilczewska, A. and Sakwa, R. (eds.) Ukraine and Russia: People, Politics, Propaganda and Perspectives. E-International Relations Publishing: Bristol.

2014

Szostek, J. (2014) Russia and the news media in Ukraine. East European Politics and Societies, 28(3), pp. 463-486. (doi: 10.1177/0888325414537297)

Szostek, J. (2014) The media battles of Ukraine's EuroMaidan. Digital Icons, 11,

Szostek, J. (2014) Review of: James Sherr, Hard Diplomacy and Soft Coercion. Russia's Influence Abroad. London: Chatham House, 2013. Europe-Asia Studies, 66(7), pp. 1205-1206. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2014.934146)[Book Review]

This list was generated on Wed Apr 21 05:01:57 2021 BST.
Number of items: 18.

Articles

Szostek, J. (2020) What happens to public diplomacy during information war? Critical reflections on the conceptual framing of international communication. International Journal of Communication, 14, pp. 2728-2748.

Szostek, J. (2018) Nothing is true? The credibility of news and conflicting narratives during “Information War” in Ukraine. International Journal of Press/Politics, 23(1), pp. 116-135. (doi: 10.1177/1940161217743258)

Szostek, J. (2018) The mass media and Russia’s “Sphere of Interests”: mechanisms of regional hegemony in Belarus and Ukraine. Geopolitics, 23(2), pp. 307-329. (doi: 10.1080/14650045.2017.1402298)

Szostek, J. (2018) News media repertoires and strategic narrative reception: A paradox of dis/belief in authoritarian Russia. New Media and Society, 20(1), pp. 68-87. (doi: 10.1177/1461444816656638)

Szostek, J. (2017) Revolution in progress? Continuity and change in Ukrainian politics. East European Politics and Societies,

Szostek, J. (2017) News consumption and anti-Western narratives in Russia: a case study of university students. Europe-Asia Studies, 69(2), pp. 284-302. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2016.1274019)

Szostek, J. (2017) Defence and promotion of desired state identity in Russia’s strategic narrative. Geopolitics, 22(3), pp. 571-593. (doi: 10.1080/14650045.2016.1214910)

Szostek, J. (2017) Popular geopolitics in Russia and post-Soviet Eastern Europe. Europe-Asia Studies, 69(2), pp. 195-201. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2017.1288861)

Szostek, J. (2017) The power and limits of Russia’s strategic narrative in Ukraine: the role of linkage. Perspectives on Politics, 15(2), pp. 379-395. (doi: 10.1017/S153759271700007X)

Szostek, J. (2016) Interdisciplinary research workshop ‘Popular geopolitics in Russia and post-Soviet Eastern Europe’, 19–20 February 2015, University College London, London, UK. Russian Journal of Communication, 8(1), pp. 96-98. (doi: 10.1080/19409419.2015.1055181)

Szostek, J. (2016) The power of detraction: Belarusion reporting of Russian social problems during "information war". Zhurnal issledovaniĭ sot︠s︡ialʹnoĭ politiki = Journal of Social Policy Studies, 14(1), pp. 99-112.

Szostek, J. (2015) Russian influence on news media in Belarus. Communist and Post-Communist Studies, 48(2-3), pp. 123-135. (doi: 10.1016/j.postcomstud.2015.06.007)

Szostek, J. (2014) Russia and the news media in Ukraine. East European Politics and Societies, 28(3), pp. 463-486. (doi: 10.1177/0888325414537297)

Szostek, J. (2014) The media battles of Ukraine's EuroMaidan. Digital Icons, 11,

Book Sections

Szostek, J. and Hutchings, S. (2015) Dominant narratives in Russian political and media discourse during the Ukraine crisis. In: Pikulicka-Wilczewska, A. and Sakwa, R. (eds.) Ukraine and Russia: People, Politics, Propaganda and Perspectives. E-International Relations Publishing: Bristol.

Book Reviews

Szostek, J. (2019) Losing Pravda: ethics and the press in post-truth Russia. Russian Journal of Communication, 11(1), pp. 88-90. (doi: 10.1080/19409419.2018.1564356)[Book Review]

Szostek, J. (2014) Review of: James Sherr, Hard Diplomacy and Soft Coercion. Russia's Influence Abroad. London: Chatham House, 2013. Europe-Asia Studies, 66(7), pp. 1205-1206. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2014.934146)[Book Review]

Research Reports or Papers

O'Loughlin, B., Szostek, J. and Vaccari, C. (2017) Written evidence submitted by New Political Communication Unit - Royal Holloway, University of London (FNW0066). Documentation. HMSO, London.

This list was generated on Wed Apr 21 05:01:57 2021 BST.

Grants

  • Marie Skłodowska-Curie Individual Fellowship (2015-2018, £186,585)
    "STRATNARRA. Russia's  strategic narrative of the West: A study of influence in Ukraine".
  • British Academy "The Humanities and Social Sciences Tackling the UK’s International Challenges Programme" (2019-2021, £48,688)
    "Peripheral audiences and state security: A study of risks and benefits associated with media use among border populations in Ukraine"

Supervision

I will gladly consider supervising PhD research projects that relate to the following topics:

  • Media and communication in international politics (including strategic narratives, public diplomacy)
  • Media and civil society in authoritarian regimes and unconsolidated democracies
  • Politics of Russia, Ukraine and the post-Soviet region
  • Russian foreign policy

If you wish to apply to study for a PhD at Glasgow, with me as a supervisor, please send me the following information by email:

  • Your PhD research proposal, prepared in line with UofG requirements (it should not exceed 1,500 words, excluding references)
  • Your curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Your transcript of records (showing the grades you achieved for your university courses)
  • A brief statement explaining why you wish to study for a PhD and how you envisage funding your doctoral studies.

Please make sure that you carefully consider all the challenges of pursuing a PhD (and perhaps an academic career) before applying!

 

I am currently supervising the following PhD project:

Qingyue Zhang: The impact of Mekong transboundary water disputes on the bilateral relationship between China and Vietnam: A strategic narrative analysis (co-supervised with Dr Neil Munro).

 

 

Teaching

Undergraduate

POLITIC4119: Politics and Social Media (convener, 2018-2019)

POLITIC4103: International Political Communication (convener, 2019-present)

POLITIC2002: Introduction to Comparative Politics (contributor, 2019-present)

Postgraduate

POLITIC5017: Internet and Civil Society (convener, 2018-present)