Events & Seminars 2013-14

Events & Seminars 2013-14

 

24 Oct 2013: The Failed European Banking Union: Banking Regulation and Supervision in Western Europe, 1965-1983

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Emmanuel Mourlon-Droul (University of Glasgow)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

21 Nov 2013: 'Improvement': British colonial settlement and the environment

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Andrew Wear (Emeritus, University College London)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

5 Dec 2013: ESH Postgraduate Students present their research

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Meagan Butler (University of Glasgow): "Husbands without wives, wives without husbands": Divorce and Separation in Scotland, c.1830-1880

Zoi Pittaki (University of Glasgow): History of Post-Second World War Greek entrepreneurship and a comparison with UK experience - Some findings for the Greek case

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

5 Feb 2014: La Vie et La Mort - Experimental Paediatrics in the Paris Maternity Hospital in the Eighteen-Sixties

Time: 17:30
Venue: Main Reading Room, Library, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow

Glasgow History of Medicine Group

Speaker: Professor Lawrence Weaver (Honorary Senior Research Fellow, Centre for the History of Medicine and Child Health, MVLS, University of Glasgow)

Coffee and Biscuits at 5pm.

The Institute of Health and Wellbeing and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow are collaborating in this new series of seminars on medical history, medical humanities and related topics. For further details please contact Malcolm.Nicolson@glasgow.ac.uk or library@rcpsg.ac.uk

 

10 Feb 2014: Double book launch: Centre for Business History in Scotland

Time: 17:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Launch event for:

‘The Business of Waste. Great Britain and Germany, 1945 to the Present’ RG Stokes, R Koster, & S Sambrook

and

‘The Optical Munitions industry in Great Britain, 1888-1923’, S Sambrook

 

20 Feb 2014: RH Tawney and the Development of Social and Economic History in Britain 1900-1960

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Lawrence Goldman (University of Oxford)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

6 Mar 2014: Keynes and Liberalism in the 1920s

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room,Lilybank House

Presenter: Richard Toye (University of Exeter)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

12 Mar 2014: The high mortality of acute kidney injury: A long view

Time: 17:30
Venue: Main Reading Room, Library, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow

Glasgow History of Medicine Group

Speaker: Dr John Turney (Retired Consultant Renal Physician, Leeds General Infirmary; Visiting Scientist, Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Manchester University)

Coffee and Biscuits at 5pm.

The Institute of Health and Wellbeing and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow are collaborating in this new series of seminars on medical history, medical humanities and related topics. For further details please contact Malcolm.Nicolson@glasgow.ac.uk or library@rcpsg.ac.uk

 

20 Mar 2014: The history of the filing cabinet, and other interesting boring things:

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Chris Williams (Open University)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

27 Mar 2014: Growing up in Glasgow: childhood experiences of family life, c.1930-1970

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Felicity Cawley (University of Glasgow)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

1 May 2014: Regional Varities of Capitalism. Regimes of Production and Consumption in comparative perspective

Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: David Gilgen (Universitat Bielefeld)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

 

16 May 2014: Gendering Dark Age Jesus - Gender & History Annual Public Lecture

Time: 16:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Lynda Coon is Professor of History and Interim Associate Dean of Fulbright College, University of Arkansas. She is a church historian specialising in the time-period ca. 300-900. She is the author of Sacred Fictions: Holy Women and Hagiography in Late Antiquity (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997) and Dark Age Bodies: Gender and Monastic Practice in the Early Medieval West (University of Pennsylvania, 2011). She is currently researching a book on imagining Jesus in the Dark Ages.

The lecture will be followed by a wine reception

ALL WELCOME

The early medieval cult dedicated to the crucified Jesus exists between two formative periods in the history of Christianity: late antiquity (ca. 200-600) and the later Middle Ages (ca. 1000-1300). On either side of the chronological divide stands some of the best work in the field of gender and religion. On the late ancient end, Jesus's gender fluctuates between heroic athlete and Roman sage, between sacred hermaphrodite and hapless victim of imperial might. On the later side of the equation, Jesus's flesh goes on to have a history all of its own, metamorphosing into a religious system in which delighting in the savior's materiality - his blood, the openings into his body, and his sweet limbs - appears in the writings of the professional religious and the laity alike, thereby producing a strikingly sensory spirituality. The multivalent Jesus of late antiquity, however, oddly transmutes in the historiographical record into the stable savior of a so-called "Dark Age," an era ostensibly known for narrowing Jesus's role to royal judge, apocalyptic divinity, or superhuman hero of an apostolic warrior band. Christ, as it were, suppresses the humanity of Jesus, who must then wait for a second "incarnation" in the eleventh century. As art historians have stressed, the Dark Age deity appears in illuminated manuscripts intensely disassociated from the flesh: his eyes stare wide open at the viewer and do so without pain even at the moment of his torturous death.

In my presentation, I shall take Jesus off of his Dark Age cross, which often serves as a distraction from his very human body, and interrogate that body within liturgical, spatial, ritual, visual, exegetical, and sensory contexts. I shall focus on Jesus's body in parts-the open eyes, the elongated torso, the extended hands, the punctured flesh. The pivotal piece of this lecture will be the gender of Jesus within the complex and shifting religious worlds of the early medieval West, where the god of the Christians could materialize simultaneously as a cosmic tree, a thorny hill, a labyrinth drawn with a monastic compass, and a tortured nobleman. Every bit as fluid as the gendered Jesus of the later Roman Empire and yet happily not as restricted in nature as the suffering savior of the Gothic era, Dark Age Jesus plays an elusive game of hide-and-seek with his spectators, fusing in his person both the human and the divine, the flesh and the spirit, the masculine and the feminine, and the Christian and the barbaric. Dark Age Jesus complicates longstanding teleological narratives about Jesus's march through history. No longer can the early medieval era be understood simply as a temporary set-back to a larger, more important story in which intimacy with the human savior is the dispensation of a subsequent era.