Dr Rucha Karnik

  • Senior Royal Society University Research Fellow (Molecular Biosciences)

telephone: 01413301945
email: Rucha.Karnik@glasgow.ac.uk

Level 2 Room 205, Plant Science Group, IMCSB, Bower Building, University Avenue, Glasgow, G12 8QQ

ORCID iDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-6876-4099

Biography

I obtained my bachelor’s degree in Biochemistry (St Xavier’s College, Ahmedabad) and master’s in biotechnology from the Gujarat University in India, earned with a 1st rank in the master’s programme. I then spent over six years in the pharma-biotech industry where I worked on research, marketing and management aspects of various projects including development of recombinant protein-based diagnostic kits, human therapeutics, biosimilars and the agro-biotech business. Drawn to fundamental research in human disease, I left the industry and moved to the UK to pursue my PhD at the University of Leeds, in the Institute of Membrane and Systems Biology. I was awarded fellowships from the prestigious Overseas Research Students Awards Scheme (ORSAS) sponsored by the British government, the Tetley & Lupton Scholarship and the International Research Scholarship from the University of Leeds for my PhD. At Leeds, I investigated membrane traffic of human K+ channels and its implications for health and disease. Following a short term at the research division of Aptuscan, a University of Leeds spin-off company, I found my calling in plant sciences.

For my postdoc, I joined Professor Mike Blatt’s group at the University of Glasgow (2011) to study fundamental plant membrane biology. I have since pursued closely related themes of membrane transport, regulation of membrane traffic and cellular homeostasis, developing a fundamental interest in molecular mechanisms of vesicle traffic and its coordination with transport, which are critical for plant physiology.

As a Royal Society University Research Fellow (2016-2025), the University of Glasgow continues to be my home. In my lab we address the overarching question 'How do plants grow?'. I am intersted in elucidating the co-ordination between membrane traffic and ion transport in plants and its impact on plant growth and development in response to pathogens and climate change.

Outside of the lab, I enjoy activities for public engagement with plant science. I drive the project Sci-seedlets which brings together a cross-disciplinary research team, artists, school teachers and members of public to develop plant science educational resources for classrooms.

Key words that comprehend Karnik lab research interests: plant growth, membrane transport, stomatal development, plant pathogenesis, membrane traffic, climate-change, CO2 sensing.

Research interests

Research Interests

In my lab we study molecular mechanisms intesecting membrane trafficking & ion transport in plants and its impact on plant growth, development and environmental responses. 

We use multi-disciplinary research platforms for our research.

We use different plant models in our studies.

Current Research Projects

1. Hormone-regulated membrane traffic in plants

Plant cells have a rigid cell wall in addition to the plasma membrane, therefore morphogenesis requires generation of turgor pressure to drive cell expansion. Transport of osmotically active solutes across the plasma membrane and their accumulation within the cell, creates turgor for cell expansion. Plasma membrane H+-ATPases are proton pumps which energise this membrane transport. They generate strong electrochemical gradients by pumping protons out of the cell which powers nutrient uptake, regulates intracellular pH and supports plant growth. Plasma membrane functions affects almost all aspects of plant physiology.

Plant hormones, especially auxin, stimulate growth by enhancing proton transport. Decades ago scientists formulated the ‘acid-growth’ hypothesis to explain auxin-induced growth; proposing that increased proton pumping acidifies the cell wall which alters its plasticity to allow expansion. Auxin-induced growth is also associated with a rapid increase in the number of the proton pumps at the plasma membrane, and delivery of the H+-ATPases to the plasma membrane via membrane traffic is vital to driving cell expansion. Yet, to date, very little is known about this traffic and its regulation. We investigate mechanisms of auxin-regulated H+-ATPase traffic and its co-ordination with spatial-regulation of proteins that affect H+-ATPase activation. We have discovered unusual roles for a secretory SNARE in regulating H+-ATPase endocytosis from the plasma membrane that dictates auxin-regulated plant growth.

 

References: 

1. Xia L, Mar Marques-Bueno M, Bruce CG, Karnik R. Unusual Roles of Secretory SNARE SYP132 in Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Traffic and Vegetative Plant Growth. Plant Physiology 2019;180(2):837-58.

2. Xia L, Mar Marques-Bueno M, Karnik R. Trafficking SNARE SYP132 Partakes in Auxin-Associated Root Growth. Plant Physiology 2020;182(4):1836-40

 

2. Novel SNARE Partners Facilitating Bacterial Pathogen Defence

Plant microbial pathogens destroy some 15% of crop production worldwide, inflicting major agricultural and socio-economic losses. Thus, understanding plant immunity is at the centre of efforts to mitigate the challenges in food production facing human society in the coming decades. Although plants have evolved defence systems, immunity comes at a cost to plant growth; crop bred to maximize growth-related traits, by contrast, often compromise on defense. To strategically maximize plant disease resistance, knowledge of the mechanisms underlying plant defences is vital to minimize reductions in yield.



Stomatal pores on the leaf surface exchange gas and water with the environment and are primary entry points for microbial pathogen. The initial defence against bacterial pathogen is stomatal closure, but pathogens commonly manipulate these defences and force stomatal opening. At a cellular level, these manipulations include commandeering ion transporters and their regulatory proteins to prevent stomata closure. Microbial pathogens also hijack cellular vesicle traffic to suppress secretion of defence-related molecules to the cell wall. Secretion at the plant plasma membrane is mediated by so-called SNARE proteins that assemble to drive the final stages of membrane vesicle fusion and deliver the vesicle contents to the cell wall and space outside the cell. Yet, the knowledge of molecular basis of these processes during plant pathogenesis is sparse and virtually nothing is known of their coordination. We use techniques in cell biology, proteomics, biochemistry, protein-protein interaction analysis and plant physiology for our studies to understand mechanisms of membrane traffic influencing bacterial pathogenesis.

Recent research in Karnik lab has uncovered that regulation of a trafficking SNARE is at the centre of mechanisms intersecting plant growth and immune responses. We have found that the SNARE binds with plasma membrane H+-ATPases and drives divergent trafficking of the proton pump and antimicrobial PR proteins at the plasma membrane. We develop research tools to aid this research.

References

1. Baena G, Xia L, Waghmare S, Karnik R. SNARE SYP132 mediates divergent trafficking of H+-ATPase AHA1 and antimicrobial PR1 during pathogenesis. Plant Physiology  28 March 2022

2. Zhang B, Xia L, Zhang Y, Wang H, Karnik R. Tri-SUS: a yeast split-ubiquitin assay to examine protein interactions governed by a third binding partner. Plant Physiology 2021;185(2):285-9.

 

3. Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Stomatal Development and Plant Water Use

Stomata are microscopic pores that facilitate plant exchanges with the environment. Each stoma is surrounded by two guard cells, that undergo dynamic changes in cell volume resulting in stomatal movements. Stomata open for uptake of CO2 for photosynthesis and close to prevent transpirational water loss, thus enforcing a major influence on the water and carbon cycles of the world (Lawson and Blatt, 2014; Jezek and Blatt, 2017). Regulation of stomata is also at the core of stomatal defence mechanisms that dictate plant health.

Environmental factors such as CO2, light intensity and microbial pathogens as well as endogenous cues such as plant hormones dynamically regulate stomatal behaviours including movements, density and patterning (Hetherington and Woodward, 2003; Bowman, 2011; Keenan et al., 2013). Stomatal responses to environmental stressors frequently transcend physiological and developmental timescales, allowing plants to address critical environmental factors both through short-term physiology and longer-term developmental patterns (Lawson and Blatt, 2014; Jezek and Blatt, 2017). Understanding mechanisms that control stomatal behaviours across timescales is of fundamental importance for strategic development of crops with enhanced productivity and immunity and reduced water use (Lawson and Blatt, 2014; Baena et al., 2022).

A large body of research data on stomata relates transpiration and carbon assimilation as a consequence of stomatal regulation for opening and closure under short time intervals (Lawson and Blatt, 2014). It is known too that stomatal behaviours are affected by stomatal patterns and clusters which affect aspects of stomatal movements in relation to surrounding cells and cavity (Rudall et al., 2018). Even so, much remains unknown for the molecular mechanisms driving stomatal clustering and their consequences for plant physiology.

This project uses Begonia species plants as models for resolving the molecular mechanisms dictating stomatal development, patterning. It draws on recent findings in the lab (Xia et al., 2019; Baena et al., 2022) that demonstrate the role for membrane trafficking SNARE proteins in stomatal regulation, and utilises the existing knowledge of genes associated with stomatal patterning from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The focus is on identifying and investigating the homologous genes expressing proteins involved in membrane traffic and stomatal biogenesis in different Begonia species. 

Collaboration: Kidner laboratory, University of Edinburgh, Royal Botanical Gardens Edinburgy, Glasgow Botanics.

 

4. Plant Memories and Forgetfulness: Connexions with CO2 Perception and Responses

Land plants must constantly adjust and adapt to their environment. Environmental fluctuations often culminate in stress for plant growth, disrupt carbon and water balance, and affect crop productivity and fresh-water use. For example, elevated carbon dioxide concentration in air is a major consequence of global climate change. Increasing atmospheric CO2 is predicted to rise from pre-industrial level of 280 μmol mol-1, approaching 900μmol mol-1 by the end of the 21st century. Plants assimilate CO2 through microscopic pores called ‘stomata’ for photosynthesis and carbon fixation. Plants respond to increases in CO2 concentration in the air by adjusting stomatal movements and over longer times by altering stomatal density and patterning on the leaf surface. How the perception of elevated CO2 signals connects stomatal movements and long-term development remains poorly understood. We study CO2-sensitive trafficking machinery in plants and its influence on physiology and developmental programmes in plant stomata. This research theme stems from need to address fundamental questions in stomatal biology which will generate advanced platforms for future cropimprovement strategies. We use also structure-function analysis to elucidate new SNAREregulatory proteins using modern proteomics and structural approaches to develop an understanding of CO2-sensitive traffic and its regulation in plant stomata. Knowledge gained will enhance our understanding of the impacts of global warming and elevated CO2 on land plants in the 21st century.

 

Promoting Public engagment with Plant Science

 

Sci-Seedlets

Modern day Plant Science is crucial to solving global challenges of climate change, ensuring food and water security for the future. I drive the Sci-Seedlets project developing resources designed to nurture plant science educational outcomes for school children and to inspire engagement with plant sciences. 

Sci-Seedlets team includes plant scientists and cell engineers at the University of Glasgow and computer scientists at Lancaster University, working with non-scientist members of public, artists and school teachers. The project is funded by the Royal Society, University of Glasgow and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, UK.

Sci-Seedlets Public engagement events (2022)

Glasgow Science Festival 2022 

Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition 2022!

 

 

Get involved!

Outreach internships are available 4-6 weeks each year -Applications are accepted all year round

Several of Sci-seedlets resources are available to download and use for free.

Visit https://sci-seedlets.org.uk

Past Activities

 

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2022 | 2021 | 2020 | 2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2004 | 2003
Number of items: 24.

2022

Baena, G. , Xia, L. , Waghmare, S. and Karnik, R. (2022) SNARE SYP132 mediates divergent trafficking of H+-ATPase AHA1 and antimicrobial PR1 during bacterial pathogenesis. Plant Physiology, 189(3), pp. 1639-1661. (doi: 10.1093/plphys/kiac149) (PMID:35348763) (PMCID:PMC9237740)

Wang, Y., Karnik, R. , Garcia-Mata, C. and Hu, H. (2022) Editorial: transport and membrane traffic in stomatal biology. Frontiers in Plant Science, 13, 898128. (doi: 10.3389/fpls.2022.898128)

2021

Zhang, B. , Xia, L., Zhang, Y., Wang, H. and Karnik, R. (2021) Tri-SUS: a yeast split-ubiquitin assay to examine protein interactions governed by a third binding partner. Plant Physiology, 185(2), pp. 285-289. (doi: 10.1093/plphys/kiaa039) (PMID:33721898)

2020

Xia, L., Marquès-Bueno, M. M. and Karnik, R. (2020) Trafficking SNARE SYP132 partakes in auxin-associated root growth. Plant Physiology, 182, pp. 1836-1840. (doi: 10.1104/pp.19.01301) (PMID:31974128)

2019

Xia, L., Marques-Bueno, M. M., Bruce, C. G. and Karnik, R. (2019) Unusual roles of secretory SNARE SYP132 in plasma membrane H+-ATPase traffic and vegetative plant growth. Plant Physiology, 180(2), pp. 837-858. (doi: 10.1104/pp.19.00266) (PMID:30926657)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Alvim, J., Donald, N. and Blatt, M. R. (2019) Dual sites for SEC11 on the SNARE SYP121 implicate a binding exchange during secretory traffic. Plant Physiology, 180, pp. 228-239. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.01315) (PMID:30850468) (PMCID:PMC6501095)

2018

Waghmare, S., Lileikyte, E., Karnik, R. , Goodman, J. K., Blatt, M. R. and Jones, A. M.E. (2018) SNAREs SYP121 and SYP122 mediate the secretion of distinct cargo subsets. Plant Physiology, 178(4), pp. 1679-1688. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.00832) (PMID:30348815)

Lefoulon, C., Waghmare, S., Karnik, R. and Blatt, M. R. (2018) Gating control and K+ uptake by the KAT1 K+ channel leaveraged through membrane anchoring of the trafficking protein SYP121. Plant, Cell and Environment, 41(11), pp. 2668-2677. (doi: 10.1111/pce.13392) (PMID:29940699) (PMCID:PMC6220998)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Donald, N. and Blatt, M. R. (2018) A GPI signal peptide-anchored split-ubiquitin (GPS) system for detecting soluble bait protein interactions at the membrane. Plant Physiology, 178(1), pp. 13-17. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.00577) (PMID:30037807)

2017

Karnik, R. , Waghmare, S., Zhang, B. , Larson, E., Lefoulon, C., Gonzalez, W. and Blatt, M. R. (2017) Commandeering channel voltage sensors for secretion, cell turgor, and volume control. Trends in Plant Science, 22(1), pp. 81-95. (doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2016.10.006) (PMID:27818003) (PMCID:PMC5224186)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Waghmare, S., Donald, N. A. and Blatt, M. R. (2017) VAMP721 conformations unmask an extended motif for K+ channel binding and gating control. Plant Physiology, 173(1), pp. 536-551. (doi: 10.1104/pp.16.01549) (PMID:27821719)

2015

Grefen, C., Karnik, R. , Larson, E., Lefoulon, C., Wang, Y., Waghmare, S., Zhang, B. , Hills, A. and Blatt, M. R. (2015) A vesicle-trafficking protein commandeers Kv channel voltage sensors for voltage-dependent secretion. Nature Plants, 1, 15108. (doi: 10.1038/nplants.2015.108)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Wang, Y., Wallmeroth, N., Blatt, M. R. and Grefen, C. (2015) The arabidopsis R-SNARE VAMP721 interacts with KAT1 and KC1 K+ channels to moderate K+ current at the plasma membrane. Plant Cell, 27(6), pp. 1697-1717. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.15.00305) (PMID:26002867) (PMCID:PMC4498211)

Karnik, R. , Zhang, B. , Waghmare, S., Aderhold, C., Grefen, C. and Blatt, M. R. (2015) Binding of SEC11 indicates its role in SNARE recycling after vesicle fusion and identifies two pathways for vesicular traffic to the plasma membrane. Plant Cell, 27(3), pp. 675-694. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.114.134429) (PMID:25747882)

2014

Lefoulon, C., Karnik, R. , Honsbein, A., Gutla, P. V., Grefen, C., Riedelsberger, J., Poblete, T., Dreyer, I., Gonzalez, W. and Blatt, M. R. (2014) Voltage-sensor transitions of the inward-rectifying K+ channel KAT1 indicate a latching mechanism biased by hydration within the voltage sensor. Plant Physiology, 166(2), pp. 960-975. (doi: 10.1104/pp.114.244319) (PMID:25185120)

2013

Karnik, R. , Ludlow, M. J., Abuarab, N., Smith, A. J., Hardy, M. E.L., Elliott, D. J.S. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2013) Endocytosis of hERG is clathrin-independent and involves Arf6. PLoS ONE, 8(12), e85630. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085630) (PMID:24392021) (PMCID:PMC3877390)

Karnik, R. , Grefen, C., Bayne, R., Honsbein, A., Kohler, T., Kioumourtzoglou, D., Williams, M., Bryant, N.J. and Blatt, M.R. (2013) Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 is a competitive and dynamic modulator of SNARE binding and SYP121-dependent vesicle traffic. Plant Cell, 25(4), pp. 1368-1382. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.112.108506) (PMID:23572542)

Karnik, A., Karnik, R. and Grefen, C. (2013) SDM-Assist software to design site-directed mutagenesis primers introducing “silent” restriction sites. BMC Bioinformatics, 14, 105. (doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-14-105) (PMID:23522286) (PMCID:PMC3644487)

2012

Wang, Y., Papanatsiou, M., Eisenach, C., Karnik, R. , Williams, M., Hills, A., Lew, V.L. and Blatt, M.R. (2012) Systems dynamic modeling of a guard cell Cl- channel mutant uncovers an emergent homeostatic network regulating stomatal transpiration. Plant Physiology, 160(4), pp. 1956-1967. (doi: 10.1104/pp.112.207704)

2010

Karnik, R. , Smith, A. J., Elliott, D. J., Taneja, T. K., Aviss, K. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2010) Lipid raft and Arf6-GTPase dependent endocytosis of the hERG potassium channel. Biophysical Journal, 98(3 S1), 376a. (doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2009.12.2028)

2009

Taneja, T. K., Mankouri, J., Karnik, R. , Kannan, S., Smith, A. J., Munsey, T., Christesen, H. B.T., Beech, D. J. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2009) Sar1-GTPase-dependent ER exit of KATP channels revealed by a mutation causing congenital hyperinsulinism. Human Molecular Genetics, 18(13), pp. 2400-2413. (doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddp179) (PMID:19357197)

2007

Ghosh, P. K., Bhardwaj, D. and Karnik, R. (2007) Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: the protein and its current & emerging applications. Indian Journal of Biotechnology, 6(4), pp. 435-448.

2004

Agrawal, Y.K. and Karnik, R. (2004) Erythromycin fermentation using Sacchropolyspora erythraea with cotton seed meal as nitrogen source. Indian Drugs, 41(3), pp. 138-142.

2003

Bisen, P. S. et al. (2003) Analysis of the shotgun expression library of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for immunodominant polypeptides: potential use in serodiagnosis. Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, 10(6), pp. 1051-1058. (doi: 10.1128/CDLI.10.6.1051-1058.2003) (PMID:14607866) (PMCID:PMC262431)

This list was generated on Fri Sep 30 06:38:45 2022 BST.
Jump to: Articles
Number of items: 24.

Articles

Baena, G. , Xia, L. , Waghmare, S. and Karnik, R. (2022) SNARE SYP132 mediates divergent trafficking of H+-ATPase AHA1 and antimicrobial PR1 during bacterial pathogenesis. Plant Physiology, 189(3), pp. 1639-1661. (doi: 10.1093/plphys/kiac149) (PMID:35348763) (PMCID:PMC9237740)

Wang, Y., Karnik, R. , Garcia-Mata, C. and Hu, H. (2022) Editorial: transport and membrane traffic in stomatal biology. Frontiers in Plant Science, 13, 898128. (doi: 10.3389/fpls.2022.898128)

Zhang, B. , Xia, L., Zhang, Y., Wang, H. and Karnik, R. (2021) Tri-SUS: a yeast split-ubiquitin assay to examine protein interactions governed by a third binding partner. Plant Physiology, 185(2), pp. 285-289. (doi: 10.1093/plphys/kiaa039) (PMID:33721898)

Xia, L., Marquès-Bueno, M. M. and Karnik, R. (2020) Trafficking SNARE SYP132 partakes in auxin-associated root growth. Plant Physiology, 182, pp. 1836-1840. (doi: 10.1104/pp.19.01301) (PMID:31974128)

Xia, L., Marques-Bueno, M. M., Bruce, C. G. and Karnik, R. (2019) Unusual roles of secretory SNARE SYP132 in plasma membrane H+-ATPase traffic and vegetative plant growth. Plant Physiology, 180(2), pp. 837-858. (doi: 10.1104/pp.19.00266) (PMID:30926657)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Alvim, J., Donald, N. and Blatt, M. R. (2019) Dual sites for SEC11 on the SNARE SYP121 implicate a binding exchange during secretory traffic. Plant Physiology, 180, pp. 228-239. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.01315) (PMID:30850468) (PMCID:PMC6501095)

Waghmare, S., Lileikyte, E., Karnik, R. , Goodman, J. K., Blatt, M. R. and Jones, A. M.E. (2018) SNAREs SYP121 and SYP122 mediate the secretion of distinct cargo subsets. Plant Physiology, 178(4), pp. 1679-1688. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.00832) (PMID:30348815)

Lefoulon, C., Waghmare, S., Karnik, R. and Blatt, M. R. (2018) Gating control and K+ uptake by the KAT1 K+ channel leaveraged through membrane anchoring of the trafficking protein SYP121. Plant, Cell and Environment, 41(11), pp. 2668-2677. (doi: 10.1111/pce.13392) (PMID:29940699) (PMCID:PMC6220998)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Donald, N. and Blatt, M. R. (2018) A GPI signal peptide-anchored split-ubiquitin (GPS) system for detecting soluble bait protein interactions at the membrane. Plant Physiology, 178(1), pp. 13-17. (doi: 10.1104/pp.18.00577) (PMID:30037807)

Karnik, R. , Waghmare, S., Zhang, B. , Larson, E., Lefoulon, C., Gonzalez, W. and Blatt, M. R. (2017) Commandeering channel voltage sensors for secretion, cell turgor, and volume control. Trends in Plant Science, 22(1), pp. 81-95. (doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2016.10.006) (PMID:27818003) (PMCID:PMC5224186)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Waghmare, S., Donald, N. A. and Blatt, M. R. (2017) VAMP721 conformations unmask an extended motif for K+ channel binding and gating control. Plant Physiology, 173(1), pp. 536-551. (doi: 10.1104/pp.16.01549) (PMID:27821719)

Grefen, C., Karnik, R. , Larson, E., Lefoulon, C., Wang, Y., Waghmare, S., Zhang, B. , Hills, A. and Blatt, M. R. (2015) A vesicle-trafficking protein commandeers Kv channel voltage sensors for voltage-dependent secretion. Nature Plants, 1, 15108. (doi: 10.1038/nplants.2015.108)

Zhang, B. , Karnik, R. , Wang, Y., Wallmeroth, N., Blatt, M. R. and Grefen, C. (2015) The arabidopsis R-SNARE VAMP721 interacts with KAT1 and KC1 K+ channels to moderate K+ current at the plasma membrane. Plant Cell, 27(6), pp. 1697-1717. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.15.00305) (PMID:26002867) (PMCID:PMC4498211)

Karnik, R. , Zhang, B. , Waghmare, S., Aderhold, C., Grefen, C. and Blatt, M. R. (2015) Binding of SEC11 indicates its role in SNARE recycling after vesicle fusion and identifies two pathways for vesicular traffic to the plasma membrane. Plant Cell, 27(3), pp. 675-694. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.114.134429) (PMID:25747882)

Lefoulon, C., Karnik, R. , Honsbein, A., Gutla, P. V., Grefen, C., Riedelsberger, J., Poblete, T., Dreyer, I., Gonzalez, W. and Blatt, M. R. (2014) Voltage-sensor transitions of the inward-rectifying K+ channel KAT1 indicate a latching mechanism biased by hydration within the voltage sensor. Plant Physiology, 166(2), pp. 960-975. (doi: 10.1104/pp.114.244319) (PMID:25185120)

Karnik, R. , Ludlow, M. J., Abuarab, N., Smith, A. J., Hardy, M. E.L., Elliott, D. J.S. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2013) Endocytosis of hERG is clathrin-independent and involves Arf6. PLoS ONE, 8(12), e85630. (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0085630) (PMID:24392021) (PMCID:PMC3877390)

Karnik, R. , Grefen, C., Bayne, R., Honsbein, A., Kohler, T., Kioumourtzoglou, D., Williams, M., Bryant, N.J. and Blatt, M.R. (2013) Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 is a competitive and dynamic modulator of SNARE binding and SYP121-dependent vesicle traffic. Plant Cell, 25(4), pp. 1368-1382. (doi: 10.1105/tpc.112.108506) (PMID:23572542)

Karnik, A., Karnik, R. and Grefen, C. (2013) SDM-Assist software to design site-directed mutagenesis primers introducing “silent” restriction sites. BMC Bioinformatics, 14, 105. (doi: 10.1186/1471-2105-14-105) (PMID:23522286) (PMCID:PMC3644487)

Wang, Y., Papanatsiou, M., Eisenach, C., Karnik, R. , Williams, M., Hills, A., Lew, V.L. and Blatt, M.R. (2012) Systems dynamic modeling of a guard cell Cl- channel mutant uncovers an emergent homeostatic network regulating stomatal transpiration. Plant Physiology, 160(4), pp. 1956-1967. (doi: 10.1104/pp.112.207704)

Karnik, R. , Smith, A. J., Elliott, D. J., Taneja, T. K., Aviss, K. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2010) Lipid raft and Arf6-GTPase dependent endocytosis of the hERG potassium channel. Biophysical Journal, 98(3 S1), 376a. (doi: 10.1016/j.bpj.2009.12.2028)

Taneja, T. K., Mankouri, J., Karnik, R. , Kannan, S., Smith, A. J., Munsey, T., Christesen, H. B.T., Beech, D. J. and Sivaprasadarao, A. (2009) Sar1-GTPase-dependent ER exit of KATP channels revealed by a mutation causing congenital hyperinsulinism. Human Molecular Genetics, 18(13), pp. 2400-2413. (doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddp179) (PMID:19357197)

Ghosh, P. K., Bhardwaj, D. and Karnik, R. (2007) Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor: the protein and its current & emerging applications. Indian Journal of Biotechnology, 6(4), pp. 435-448.

Agrawal, Y.K. and Karnik, R. (2004) Erythromycin fermentation using Sacchropolyspora erythraea with cotton seed meal as nitrogen source. Indian Drugs, 41(3), pp. 138-142.

Bisen, P. S. et al. (2003) Analysis of the shotgun expression library of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for immunodominant polypeptides: potential use in serodiagnosis. Clinical and Diagnostic Laboratory Immunology, 10(6), pp. 1051-1058. (doi: 10.1128/CDLI.10.6.1051-1058.2003) (PMID:14607866) (PMCID:PMC262431)

This list was generated on Fri Sep 30 06:38:45 2022 BST.

Grants

Grants and Awards listed are those received whilst working with the University of Glasgow.

  • IRGA-Live Clamp: An integrated infrared gas-analysis platform to investigate systemic signalling within the plant canopy
    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
    2022 - 2023
     
  • Diversity in STEM
    The Royal Society
    2022 - 2025
     
  • Plant Memories and Forgetfulness: Connexions with CO2 Perception and Responses
    The Royal Society
    2022 - 2025
     
  • Sci-Seedlets - BBSRC IAA
    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
    2021 - 2022
     
  • Elucidating Novel Mechanisms For CO2 - Sensing in Plants
    Wellcome Trust
    2021 - 2022
     
  • Sci-seedlets
    The Royal Society
    2021 - 2023
     
  • CO2 influence on SNARE regulation
    The Royal Society
    2021 - 2023
     
  • Sci-Seedlets- Nurturing Plant Science Educational Outcomes in School Children
    BBSRC
    2021 - 2022
     
  • SYP-SLAC
    BBSRC
    2021 - 2024
     
  • SNARE endocytosis and secretory vesicle reuse in plant growth-defense trade offs
    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
    2019 - 2022
     
  • How Do Plants Fight Microbes?- The Defence Song
    The Royal Society
    2019 - 2019
     
  • Proton Transport Modulators - Spatial Regulation and Effects on Plant Physiology
    The Royal Society
    2017 - 2021
     
  • Hormone-Regulated Membrane Traffic and Plant Morphogenesis
    The Royal Society
    2016 - 2022
     

Supervision

PhD Projects

Karnik lab currently hosts PhD students funded by the Royal Society, China Scholarship Council and ML Begoina Trust.

I am currently accepting applications for PhD studies  

Self-funded Projects

Applications for self-funded projects are accepted throughout the year

 

Funded Projects -- Applications are now closed!

MVLS DTP 2022/23 funded project

Applications close 1st June 2022

M L Macintyre Begonia Trust funded project

  • Engineering Stomatal Patterns in Plants for Enhanced Water Use Efficiency– Learning From Begonia Models

Apply Online indicating Dr Karnik as supervisor

 

Applications close: 7th July 2022

PG & UG Projects 

Karnik Lab hosts PGT, Honours Projects each year, focused around core research interests of the lab.

Summer research internships -

Undergraduate student internships are available in the Karnik lab for 6-8 weeks. Applications are accepted Feb-March each year.

Teaching

  • Level 4: Honours Project Supervisor

  • MSc. Biotechnology assessor & project supervisor

  • MSc. Food Security assessor & project supervisor

  • MSc. Food Security, MSc Biotechnology & Level 4 BIOL5312, BIOL5213, BIOL4110
    Plant Biotechnology Platforms and Research Tools 

  • Level 3 Biomolecular Sciences Bioenergetics Lectures 

Professional activities & recognition

Research fellowships

  • 2016 - 2025: Royal Society University Research Fellowship

Grant committees & research advisory boards

  • 2020 - 2023: Royal Society, Royal Society Hooke Committee
  • 2023 - 2025: Royal Society, Royal Society Grants Committee

Editorial boards

  • 2019 - 2022: Guest Associate Editor for Plant Membrane Traffic and Transport, Frontiers in Plant Science

Selected international presentations

  • 2021: Plant Biology 2021 Worldwide Summit, Cell Biology symposium (virtual)
  • 2019: International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology (Glasgow)
  • 2017: European Network for Plant Endomembrane Research (France)
  • 2014: Gordon Research Conference: Salt & Water Stress in Plants (Maine NE)
  • 2013: European Network for Plant Endomembrane Research (Ghent)