Dr Steph Rennick

  • Research Associate in Philosophy (Philosophy)

telephone: 0141 330 3289
email: Stephanie.Rennick@glasgow.ac.uk

Room 527, Philosophy Department, 67-69 Oakfield Avenue, Glasgow, G12 8QQ

ORCID iDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-3524-8044

Research interests

My research interests span several areas of metaphysics and epistemology with a particular focus on time travel, foreknowledge and causal loops. I am a Research Associate on the Swiss National Science Foundation funded project “Being Without Foundations”, having previously worked as a lecturer here and at Cardiff University. 

Part of my work is located at the intersection of philosophy and pop culture, fostering a bi-directional exchange between academics and the consumers and creators of speculative fiction across different media. To this end I run the Epicurean Cure

For more information about my research and public engagement work, see https://www.stephrennick.com/.

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2018 | 2017 | 2015
Number of items: 6.

2018

Rennick, S. (2018) The Routledge Companion to Free Will, edited by Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith, and Neil Levy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 96(3), pp. 626-627. (doi: 10.1080/00048402.2017.1384847)[Book Review]

2017

Rennick, S. and Newey, C. (2017) Improving peer review: a pilot study. Project Report. Cardiff University.

Rennick, S. (2017) Prophetic foreknowledge in Game of Thrones. In: Silverman, E. J. and Arp, R. (eds.) The Ultimate Game of Thrones and Philosophy: You Think or Die. Series: Popular culture and philosophy (105). Open Court: Chicago, pp. 151-158. ISBN 9780812699500

Rennick, S. (2017) Foreknowledge. In: Pritchard, D. (ed.) Oxford Bibliographies. Philosophy. Oxford University Press: Oxford. ISBN 9780195396577 (doi:10.1093/obo/9780195396577-0332)

Rennick, S. (2017) Purpose in the Universe: The Moral and Metaphysical Case for Ananthropocentric Purposivism, by Tim Mulgan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 95(3), pp. 615-617. (doi: 10.1080/00048402.2016.1231697)[Book Review]

2015

Rennick, S. (2015) Things mere mortals can do, but philosophers can't. Analysis, 75(1), pp. 22-26. (doi: 10.1093/analys/anu097)

This list was generated on Tue Nov 24 10:23:58 2020 GMT.
Number of items: 6.

Articles

Rennick, S. (2015) Things mere mortals can do, but philosophers can't. Analysis, 75(1), pp. 22-26. (doi: 10.1093/analys/anu097)

Book Sections

Rennick, S. (2017) Prophetic foreknowledge in Game of Thrones. In: Silverman, E. J. and Arp, R. (eds.) The Ultimate Game of Thrones and Philosophy: You Think or Die. Series: Popular culture and philosophy (105). Open Court: Chicago, pp. 151-158. ISBN 9780812699500

Rennick, S. (2017) Foreknowledge. In: Pritchard, D. (ed.) Oxford Bibliographies. Philosophy. Oxford University Press: Oxford. ISBN 9780195396577 (doi:10.1093/obo/9780195396577-0332)

Book Reviews

Rennick, S. (2018) The Routledge Companion to Free Will, edited by Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith, and Neil Levy. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 96(3), pp. 626-627. (doi: 10.1080/00048402.2017.1384847)[Book Review]

Rennick, S. (2017) Purpose in the Universe: The Moral and Metaphysical Case for Ananthropocentric Purposivism, by Tim Mulgan. Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 95(3), pp. 615-617. (doi: 10.1080/00048402.2016.1231697)[Book Review]

Research Reports or Papers

Rennick, S. and Newey, C. (2017) Improving peer review: a pilot study. Project Report. Cardiff University.

This list was generated on Tue Nov 24 10:23:58 2020 GMT.

Supervision

I am willing to supervise projects relating to my research interests. I am also very open to interdisciplinary supervision e.g. on tropes in popular culture, science fiction and/or video games.