Dr Grant Hopcraft

  • Research Fellow (Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health & Comparative Medicine)
  • Associate (School of Life Sciences)

telephone: 0141-330-6993
email: Grant.Hopcraft@glasgow.ac.uk

Biography

 

  • 2015-current: Senior Research Fellow - University of Glasgow
  • 2012–2015: Lord Kelvin Adam Smith Fellow – University of Glasgow
  • 2012: Post-doctoral research associate – University of St Andrews
  • 2011-2012: Post-doctoral research – Frankfurt Zoological Society
  • 2005-2010: PhD. Community and Conservation Ecology – University of Groningen
  • 2003-2008: Serengeti GIS & Ecological Monitoring – Frankfurt Zoological Society
  • 1999-2002: MSc. Zoology & Teaching assistant – University of British Columbia
  • 1996-1999: Serengeti Lion Project – University of Minnesota
  • 1990-1995: BSc. Biology (Cooperative Education Program) – University of Victoria

Research interests

My research broadly investigates landscape-scale ecological processes that determine the distribution and abundance of animals. I focus on African savannahs as model ecosystems to investigate how underlying biogeographical gradients, such as rainfall and soil fertility, influence animal nutrition and predation rates, and how these gradients structure community assemblages.

I study ecosystems from a large-scale holistic perspective by combining field metrics (including intensive soil and grass sampling, GPS tracking wildebeest and zebra migrations, resident animal censuses, biodiversity inventories) with digital mapping and remote sensing (GIS/RS) to test biological theories.

I am particularly interested in:

  • Migrations and movement of animals using GPS tracking, physiological indicators and state-space models
  • Ecosystem dynamics including how disturbance events and interactions between species can shift ecosystems into different states
  • The impacts of climate change on animal populations and human livelihoods especially in terms of disease transmission and competition for limited resources
  • Animal censuses and biodiversity estimates
  • Remote sensing and GIS
  • Element analysis of grass and forage

 

Current Projects

Serengeti Biodiversity Program

The Serengeti Biodiversity Program aims to collect, maintain, analyse and build on 60 years of biotic and abiotic data that defines the dynamic nature of the Serengeti ecosystem including weather, vegetation, fires, wildlife, and people. We manage a core Information Resource Centre that allows us to monitor the impacts of long-term global trends (such as climate change) with particular emphasis on ecosystem services of the Serengeti. In particular, we use the long-term data generated by Program to train the next generation of national and international conservation biologists.  The data are integrated into a routine monthly feed-back system between research and management that summarizes the status and health of the ecosystem and facilitates an adaptive management strategy.

 Serengeti Biodiveristy Program Report 2017

 

 

This project aims to unravel how human activity and climate change impact key ecosystem services.  The project is based in the Serengeti-Mara  between Tanzania and Kenya. The project investigate how impacts such population growth, land-use change and climate change affect human wellbeing and potentially exacerbate poverty.

Our role is to understand how the migration of wildebeest and zebra is impacted by infrastructure development and to explore ways in which we can improve the ecotourism benefits for local people. The overall aim is to derive novel sustainable solutions that will protect biodiversity, and improve the benefits that people derive from the unique ecosystems within the region.

 
 

Lab Members - Serengeti Biodiversity Program

The Serengeti Biodiversity Program provides the backbone where I test ecological theories and ideas about how ecosystems operate and what governs biotic and abiotic interactions.The programme was started by A.R.E Sinclairin 1964 and we continue to maintain a long-running ecological databases designed to monitor the causes and consequences of natural and anthropogenic changes in ecosystem dynamics. I am currently the PI for the Serengeti Biodiversity Programme and fortunate to work with some amazing people.

 

  Dr Thomas Morrison(Postdoctoral Researcher Associate) – Causes and consequences of large mammal migrations in the Serengeti (Funding AfricanBioServices)

  

 

Callum Buchanan(PhD Candidate) – Chronological steroid patterns in wildebeest and zebra tail hair (Funding AfricanBioServices)

  

 Kimberly Wood (PhD Candidate) – Using isotopic forensics to establish a life-time profile of migratory movement and animal health (Funding SUERC / NERC)

 

 Divine Ekwem (PhD Candidate) – Livestock movements as determinants of foot-and-mouth disease circulation in northern Tanzania (Funding Gates Foundation & AfricanBioServices)

  

 Lucy Cotgrove (PhD Candidate) – Collective behaviour and alternating modes of leadership (Funding EPSRC)

  

Lacey Hughey(PhD Candidate UC Santa Barbara and visiting ERC Nova Domus scholar) – Advancing behavioural ecology with remote sensing: large-scale observational and e xperimental approaches to understand collective motion in wild ungulates (Funding NSF)

  

 

Emilian Kihwele(PhD Candidate - Univeristy of Groningen) – The interplay between ecohydrology, herbivores and fire for ecosystem function and services in Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem (Funding AfricanBioServices & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

 Karimjee Scholars - MSc Students

 

Ronald Vincent (MSc candidate and Karimjee Scholar) - Estimating the genetic pedigree and relatedness of Tanzania’s black rhino population. (Funding Paul Tudor Jones Family Trust & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

 ‌

 

Evaline Munisi (MSc candidate and Karimjee Scholar) - Understanding the expansion of the African daisy (Gutenbergia cordifolia)in the Serengeti Ecosystem (Funding Karimjee Jivanjee Trust & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

 

 

 Zabibu Kabalika (MSc candidate and Karimjee Scholar) - Non-invasive techniques for assessing the movement of livestock in the Serengeti Ecosystem using sequential enrichment of Sulphur isotopes in tail hair. (Funding Karimjee Jivanjee Trust & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

  

 Allan Baino (MSc candidate and Karimjee Scholar)– Using stable carbon-13 to discern temporal and spatial diet composition in populations of white-backed vultures in Tanzania. (Funding Karimjee Jivanjee Trust & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

  

 Koggani Dickson (MSc candidate and Karimjee Scholar) – Assessment of dietary composition between Puku antelope and livestock, in the Kilombero valley, Tanzania. (Funding Karimjee Jivanjee Trust & Serengeti Biodiversity Programme)

 

Teaching

Co-coordinator for MSc program in Conservation and Management of African Ecosystems

Principles of Applied Conservation Ecology (MSc Conservation and Management of African Ecosystems)

Principles in Ecology (MSc Wildlife and Livestock Management)

 

Student opportunities

Karimjee Jivanjee Conservation Scholarships – a fully funded MSc program for Tanzanian students hosted between the University of Glasgow and the Nelson Mandela African Institute of Science and Technology (application deadline is April each year – email for more information bahcm-cmae@glasgow.ac.uk)

MSc Conservation and Management of African Ecosystems – This is a double Masters programme implemented jointly with the Nelson Mandela African Institution of Science and Technology in Arusha, Tanzania. This MSc program requires students to carry out an in-depth research project in Tanzania. Tanzanian students are encouraged to apply through the Karimjee Jivanjee Conservation Scholarship

MSc Quantitative Methods in Biodiversity, Conservation and Epidemiology - This Masters programme provides specific training in data collection, modelling and statistical analyses required for successful careers in ecology, conservation, and animal and human health. It’s a great way to get involved with our research.

 
 

Conservation, Impacts & Outreach

My research is a mixture of strong hypothesis testing research with applied biodiversity and conservation work. Some direct outputs from my research are:

Colin Torney's YouTube Video

 
 

Recent media coverage


Ben Fogle and Channel Five covers our research program in "The Great African Migration".

 
 

Collaborators

 
 

Publications:

Google Scholar

 

Live Updates from the Serengeti Migration

Get daily updates from the GPS collared wildebeest and zebra migration from our public website:

 

 Serengeti Tracker App:

Track the Serengeti wildebeest and zebra migration in real time

 


Grants

Grants and Awards listed are those received whilst working with the University of Glasgow.

  • Serengeti wildebeest population survey
    Frankfurt Zoological Society
    2018 - 2019
     
  • SFC-GCRF: Identifying GCRF challenges for sustainable agriculture and ecosystem services in Tanzania's livestock sector
    Scottish Funding Council
    2016 - 2017
     
  • BBSRC IAAF - Boyd Orr Tanzania Research Accelerator
    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
    2016 - 2017
     
  • AfricanBioServices
    European Commission
    2015 - 2019
     
  • Can tail hair inform us about an animal's history? Recreating a physiological diary of migrating Serengeti wildebeest through time
    British Ecological Society
    2014 - 2015
     
  • Can tail hair inform us about an animals history? Recreating a physiological diary of migrating Serengeti wildebeest through time
    British Ecological Society
    2014 - 2016
     
  • Novel approaches to recreating animal histories: the metabolic signature of hair (ISSF Catalyst)
    Wellcome Trust
    2013 - 2014
     

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2018 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004
Number of items: 35.

2018

Torney, C. J., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Morrison, T. A., Couzin, I. D. and Levin, S. A. (2018) From single steps to mass migration: the problem of scale in the movement ecology of the Serengeti wildebeest. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 373(1746), 20170012. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2017.0012) (PMID:29581397)

2016

Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. , Frank, L. and Singh, N. (2016) Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. Journal of Applied Ecology, 53(4), pp. 1195-1205. (doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632)

Rysava, K. , McGill, R.A.R. , Matthiopoulos, J. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 130(13), pp. 1461-1468. (doi:10.1002/rcm.7572) (PMID:27321833)

Bukombe, J., Senzota, R. B., Fryxell, J. M., Kittle, A., Kija, H., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A. R.E. (2016) Do animal size, seasons and vegetation type influence detection probability and density estimates of Serengeti ungulates? African Journal of Ecology, 54(1), pp. 29-38. (doi:10.1111/aje.12255)

Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Population regulation and climate change: the future of Africa's antelope. In: Bro-Jørgensen, J. and Mallon, D. P. (eds.) Antelope Conservation: From Diagnosis to Action. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pp. 32-50. ISBN 9781118409640 (doi:10.1002/9781118409572.ch3)

Torney, C. J., Dobson, A. P., Borner, F., Lloyd-Jones, D. J., Moyer, D., Maliti, H. T., Mwita, M., Fredrick, H., Borner, M. and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Assessing rotation-invariant feature classification for automated wildebeest population counts. PLoS ONE, 11(5), e0156342. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156342) (PMID:27227888) (PMCID:PMC4881999)

2015

Nugent, R. A., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Bigurube, G., Lembeli, J. D. and Borner, M. (2015) Balancing conservation with national development: a socio-economic case study of the alternatives to the Serengeti Road. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0130577. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130577) (PMID:26200107) (PMCID:PMC4511738)

Durant, S. M. et al. (2015) Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. Journal of Applied Ecology, 52(3), pp. 544-551. (doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12415)

Hopcraft, J. G. C. et al. (2015) Conservation and economic benefits of a road around the Serengeti. Conservation Biology, 29(3), pp. 932-936. (doi:10.1111/cobi.12470) (PMID:25711283)

Hopcraft, J. G. C., Holdo, R. M., Mwangomo, E., Mduma, S., Thirgood, S. J., Borner, M., Fryxell, J. M., Olff, H. and Sinclair, A. R.E. (2015) Why are wildebeest the most abundant herbivore in the Serengeti? In: Sinclair, A. R.E., Metzger, K. L., Mduma, S. A.R. and Fryxell, J. M. (eds.) Serengeti IV: Sustaining Biodiversity in a Coupled Human-Natural System. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226195834 (doi:10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.001.0001)

2014

Hopcraft, J. G. C., Morales, J.M., Beyer, H.L., Borner, M., Mwangomo, E., Sinclair, A.R.E., Olff, H. and Haydon, D. T. (2014) Competition, predation, and migration: individual choice patterns of Serengeti migrants captured by hierarchical models. Ecological Monographs, 84(3), pp. 355-372. (doi:10.1890/13-1446.1)

Langrock, R. et al. (2014) Modelling group dynamic animal movement. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5(2), pp. 190-199. (doi:10.1111/2041-210X.12155)

Virani, M. Z., Kendall, C. J., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Bildstein, K. L. and Rubenstein, D. I. (2014) African vultures don’t follow migratory herds: scavenger habitat use is not mediated by prey abundance. PLoS ONE, 9(1), e83470. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083470) (PMID:24421887) (PMCID:PMC3885425)

2013

Creel, S. et al. (2013) Conserving large populations of lions - the argument for fences has holes. Ecology Letters, 16(11), 1413-e3. (doi:10.1111/ele.12145)

Ferguson, K.J. et al. (2013) Evaluating the potential for the environmentally sustainable control of foot and mouth disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. EcoHealth, 10(3), pp. 314-322. (doi:10.1007/s10393-013-0850-6)

2012

Hopcraft, T.G.C., Anderson, T.M., Pérez-Vila, S., Mayemba, E. and Olff, H. (2012) Body size and the division of niche space: food and predation differentially shape the distribution of Serengeti grazers. Journal of Animal Ecology, 81(1), pp. 201-213. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2011.01885.x)

2011

Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2011) Ensuring the long-term conservation of ecosystems: The role of monitoring databases. In: Randall, D., Thirgood, S. and Kinahan, A. (eds.) Walia: Special Edition on the Bale Mountains. Series: WALIA: Journal of the Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society. Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society, pp. 306-331.

2010

Metzger, K. L., Sinclair, A. R. E., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C. and Mduma, S.R. (2010) Evaluating the protection of wildlife in parks: the case of African buffalo in Serengeti. Biodiversity and Conservation, 19(12), pp. 3431-3444. (doi:10.1007/s10531-010-9904-z)

Dobson, A.P. et al. (2010) Road will ruin Serengeti. Nature, 467(7313), pp. 272-273. (doi:10.1038/467272a)

Anderson, T.M., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Eby, S., Ritchie, M., Grace, J.B. and Olff, H. (2010) Landscape-scale analyses suggest both nutrient and antipredator advantages to Serengeti herbivore hotspots. Ecology, 91(5), pp. 1519-1529. (doi:10.1890/09-0739.1)

Hopcraft, J.G.C., Olff, H. and Sinclair, A.R.E. (2010) Herbivores, resources and risks: alternating regulation along primary environmental gradients in savannas. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 25(2), pp. 119-128. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2009.08.001)

2009

Harris, G., Thirgood, S., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Cromsight, J.P.G.M. and Berger, J. (2009) Global decline in aggregated migrations of large terrestrial mammals. Endangered Species Research, 7(1), pp. 55-76. (doi:10.3354/esr00173)

2008

Hopcraft, J.G.C. (P. a. E.) (2008) Official Map of the Serengeti Ecosystem. Harvey Publishers.

Mduma, S.A.R. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2008) The main herbivorous mammals and crocodile in the Greater Serengeti ecosystem. In: Sinclair, A.R.E., Packer, C., Mduma, S.A.R. and Fryxell, J.M. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. Series: 9780226760339. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, pp. 497-506.

Olff, H. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2008) The resource basis for human-wildlife interaction. In: Sinclair, A.R.E. and Packer, C. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226760339

Sinclair, A.R.E., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mduma, S.A.R. and Galvin, K. (2008) Historical and future changes to the Serengeti ecosystem. In: Sinclair, A.R.E. and Packer, C. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226760339

2007

Metzger, K.L., Sinclair, A.R.E., Campbell, K.L.I., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mduma, S.R. and Reich, R.M. (2007) Using historical data to establish baselines for conservation: The black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) of the Serengeti as a case study. Biological Conservation, 139(3-4), pp. 358-374. (doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2007.06.026)

Sinclair, A.R.E., Mduma, S.A.R., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Fryxell, J.M., Hilborn, R. and Thirgood, S. (2007) Long-Term ecosystem dynamics in the Serengeti: lessons for conservation. Conservation Biology, 21(3), pp. 580-590. (doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2007.00699.x)

Young, J. K., Gerber, L. R., D'Agrosa, C., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C. and Arcese, P. (2007) Wildlife population increases in Serengeti national park. Science, 315(5820), pp. 1790-1791. (doi:10.1126/science.315.5820.1790b)

2006

Hilborn, R., Arcese, P., Borner, M., Hando, J., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Loibooki, M., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A. R. E. (2006) Effective Enforcement in a Conservation Area. Science, 314(5803), p. 1266. (doi:10.1126/science.1132780)

Boone, R.B., Thirgood, S.J. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2006) serengeti wildebeest migratory patterns modeled from rainfall and new vegetation growth. Ecology, 87(8), pp. 1987-1994. (doi:10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[1987:SWMPMF]2.0.CO;2)

West, P.M., MacCormick, H., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Whitman, K., Ericson, M., Hordinsky, M. and Packer, C. (2006) Wounding, mortality and mane morphology in African lions, Panthera leo. Animal Behaviour, 71(3), pp. 609-619. (doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.06.009)

2005

Hopcraft, J.G.C., Sinclair, A. R. E. and Packer, C. (2005) Planning for success: Serengeti lions seek prey accessibility rather than abundance. Journal of Animal Ecology, 74(3), pp. 559-566. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00955.x)

Packer, C., Hilborn, R., Mosser, A., Kissui, B., Borner, M., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Wilmshurst, J., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A.R.E. (2005) Ecological change, group territoriality, and population dynamics in Serengeti lions. Science, 307(5708), pp. 390-393. (doi:10.1126/science.1105122)

2004

Thirgood, S., Mosser, A., Tham, S., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mwangomo, E., Mlengeya, T., Kilewo, M., Fryxell, J., Sinclair, A. R. E. and Borner, M. (2004) Can parks protect migratory ungulates? The case of the Serengeti wildebeest. Animal Conservation, 7(2), pp. 113-120. (doi:10.1017/S1367943004001404)

This list was generated on Tue Dec 18 08:19:09 2018 GMT.
Number of items: 35.

Articles

Torney, C. J., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Morrison, T. A., Couzin, I. D. and Levin, S. A. (2018) From single steps to mass migration: the problem of scale in the movement ecology of the Serengeti wildebeest. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 373(1746), 20170012. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2017.0012) (PMID:29581397)

Blackburn, S., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Ogutu, J. O., Matthiopoulos, J. , Frank, L. and Singh, N. (2016) Human-wildlife conflict, benefit sharing and the survival of lions in pastoralist community-based conservancies. Journal of Applied Ecology, 53(4), pp. 1195-1205. (doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12632)

Rysava, K. , McGill, R.A.R. , Matthiopoulos, J. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2016) Re-constructing nutritional history of Serengeti wildebeest from stable isotopes in tail hair: seasonal starvation patterns in an obligate grazer. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, 130(13), pp. 1461-1468. (doi:10.1002/rcm.7572) (PMID:27321833)

Bukombe, J., Senzota, R. B., Fryxell, J. M., Kittle, A., Kija, H., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A. R.E. (2016) Do animal size, seasons and vegetation type influence detection probability and density estimates of Serengeti ungulates? African Journal of Ecology, 54(1), pp. 29-38. (doi:10.1111/aje.12255)

Torney, C. J., Dobson, A. P., Borner, F., Lloyd-Jones, D. J., Moyer, D., Maliti, H. T., Mwita, M., Fredrick, H., Borner, M. and Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Assessing rotation-invariant feature classification for automated wildebeest population counts. PLoS ONE, 11(5), e0156342. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0156342) (PMID:27227888) (PMCID:PMC4881999)

Nugent, R. A., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Bigurube, G., Lembeli, J. D. and Borner, M. (2015) Balancing conservation with national development: a socio-economic case study of the alternatives to the Serengeti Road. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0130577. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0130577) (PMID:26200107) (PMCID:PMC4511738)

Durant, S. M. et al. (2015) Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. Journal of Applied Ecology, 52(3), pp. 544-551. (doi:10.1111/1365-2664.12415)

Hopcraft, J. G. C. et al. (2015) Conservation and economic benefits of a road around the Serengeti. Conservation Biology, 29(3), pp. 932-936. (doi:10.1111/cobi.12470) (PMID:25711283)

Hopcraft, J. G. C., Morales, J.M., Beyer, H.L., Borner, M., Mwangomo, E., Sinclair, A.R.E., Olff, H. and Haydon, D. T. (2014) Competition, predation, and migration: individual choice patterns of Serengeti migrants captured by hierarchical models. Ecological Monographs, 84(3), pp. 355-372. (doi:10.1890/13-1446.1)

Langrock, R. et al. (2014) Modelling group dynamic animal movement. Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 5(2), pp. 190-199. (doi:10.1111/2041-210X.12155)

Virani, M. Z., Kendall, C. J., Hopcraft, J. G. C., Bildstein, K. L. and Rubenstein, D. I. (2014) African vultures don’t follow migratory herds: scavenger habitat use is not mediated by prey abundance. PLoS ONE, 9(1), e83470. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083470) (PMID:24421887) (PMCID:PMC3885425)

Creel, S. et al. (2013) Conserving large populations of lions - the argument for fences has holes. Ecology Letters, 16(11), 1413-e3. (doi:10.1111/ele.12145)

Ferguson, K.J. et al. (2013) Evaluating the potential for the environmentally sustainable control of foot and mouth disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. EcoHealth, 10(3), pp. 314-322. (doi:10.1007/s10393-013-0850-6)

Hopcraft, T.G.C., Anderson, T.M., Pérez-Vila, S., Mayemba, E. and Olff, H. (2012) Body size and the division of niche space: food and predation differentially shape the distribution of Serengeti grazers. Journal of Animal Ecology, 81(1), pp. 201-213. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2011.01885.x)

Metzger, K. L., Sinclair, A. R. E., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C. and Mduma, S.R. (2010) Evaluating the protection of wildlife in parks: the case of African buffalo in Serengeti. Biodiversity and Conservation, 19(12), pp. 3431-3444. (doi:10.1007/s10531-010-9904-z)

Dobson, A.P. et al. (2010) Road will ruin Serengeti. Nature, 467(7313), pp. 272-273. (doi:10.1038/467272a)

Anderson, T.M., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Eby, S., Ritchie, M., Grace, J.B. and Olff, H. (2010) Landscape-scale analyses suggest both nutrient and antipredator advantages to Serengeti herbivore hotspots. Ecology, 91(5), pp. 1519-1529. (doi:10.1890/09-0739.1)

Hopcraft, J.G.C., Olff, H. and Sinclair, A.R.E. (2010) Herbivores, resources and risks: alternating regulation along primary environmental gradients in savannas. Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 25(2), pp. 119-128. (doi:10.1016/j.tree.2009.08.001)

Harris, G., Thirgood, S., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Cromsight, J.P.G.M. and Berger, J. (2009) Global decline in aggregated migrations of large terrestrial mammals. Endangered Species Research, 7(1), pp. 55-76. (doi:10.3354/esr00173)

Metzger, K.L., Sinclair, A.R.E., Campbell, K.L.I., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mduma, S.R. and Reich, R.M. (2007) Using historical data to establish baselines for conservation: The black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) of the Serengeti as a case study. Biological Conservation, 139(3-4), pp. 358-374. (doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2007.06.026)

Sinclair, A.R.E., Mduma, S.A.R., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Fryxell, J.M., Hilborn, R. and Thirgood, S. (2007) Long-Term ecosystem dynamics in the Serengeti: lessons for conservation. Conservation Biology, 21(3), pp. 580-590. (doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2007.00699.x)

Young, J. K., Gerber, L. R., D'Agrosa, C., Hilborn, R., Hopcraft, J.G.C. and Arcese, P. (2007) Wildlife population increases in Serengeti national park. Science, 315(5820), pp. 1790-1791. (doi:10.1126/science.315.5820.1790b)

Hilborn, R., Arcese, P., Borner, M., Hando, J., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Loibooki, M., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A. R. E. (2006) Effective Enforcement in a Conservation Area. Science, 314(5803), p. 1266. (doi:10.1126/science.1132780)

Boone, R.B., Thirgood, S.J. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2006) serengeti wildebeest migratory patterns modeled from rainfall and new vegetation growth. Ecology, 87(8), pp. 1987-1994. (doi:10.1890/0012-9658(2006)87[1987:SWMPMF]2.0.CO;2)

West, P.M., MacCormick, H., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Whitman, K., Ericson, M., Hordinsky, M. and Packer, C. (2006) Wounding, mortality and mane morphology in African lions, Panthera leo. Animal Behaviour, 71(3), pp. 609-619. (doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2005.06.009)

Hopcraft, J.G.C., Sinclair, A. R. E. and Packer, C. (2005) Planning for success: Serengeti lions seek prey accessibility rather than abundance. Journal of Animal Ecology, 74(3), pp. 559-566. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00955.x)

Packer, C., Hilborn, R., Mosser, A., Kissui, B., Borner, M., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Wilmshurst, J., Mduma, S. and Sinclair, A.R.E. (2005) Ecological change, group territoriality, and population dynamics in Serengeti lions. Science, 307(5708), pp. 390-393. (doi:10.1126/science.1105122)

Thirgood, S., Mosser, A., Tham, S., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mwangomo, E., Mlengeya, T., Kilewo, M., Fryxell, J., Sinclair, A. R. E. and Borner, M. (2004) Can parks protect migratory ungulates? The case of the Serengeti wildebeest. Animal Conservation, 7(2), pp. 113-120. (doi:10.1017/S1367943004001404)

Books

Hopcraft, J.G.C. (P. a. E.) (2008) Official Map of the Serengeti Ecosystem. Harvey Publishers.

Book Sections

Hopcraft, J. G. C. (2016) Population regulation and climate change: the future of Africa's antelope. In: Bro-Jørgensen, J. and Mallon, D. P. (eds.) Antelope Conservation: From Diagnosis to Action. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pp. 32-50. ISBN 9781118409640 (doi:10.1002/9781118409572.ch3)

Hopcraft, J. G. C., Holdo, R. M., Mwangomo, E., Mduma, S., Thirgood, S. J., Borner, M., Fryxell, J. M., Olff, H. and Sinclair, A. R.E. (2015) Why are wildebeest the most abundant herbivore in the Serengeti? In: Sinclair, A. R.E., Metzger, K. L., Mduma, S. A.R. and Fryxell, J. M. (eds.) Serengeti IV: Sustaining Biodiversity in a Coupled Human-Natural System. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226195834 (doi:10.7208/chicago/9780226196336.001.0001)

Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2011) Ensuring the long-term conservation of ecosystems: The role of monitoring databases. In: Randall, D., Thirgood, S. and Kinahan, A. (eds.) Walia: Special Edition on the Bale Mountains. Series: WALIA: Journal of the Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society. Ethiopian Wildlife and Natural History Society, pp. 306-331.

Mduma, S.A.R. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2008) The main herbivorous mammals and crocodile in the Greater Serengeti ecosystem. In: Sinclair, A.R.E., Packer, C., Mduma, S.A.R. and Fryxell, J.M. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. Series: 9780226760339. University of Chicago Press: Chicago, pp. 497-506.

Olff, H. and Hopcraft, J.G.C. (2008) The resource basis for human-wildlife interaction. In: Sinclair, A.R.E. and Packer, C. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226760339

Sinclair, A.R.E., Hopcraft, J.G.C., Mduma, S.A.R. and Galvin, K. (2008) Historical and future changes to the Serengeti ecosystem. In: Sinclair, A.R.E. and Packer, C. (eds.) Serengeti III: Human Impacts on Ecosystem Dynamics. University of Chicago Press: Chicago. ISBN 9780226760339

This list was generated on Tue Dec 18 08:19:09 2018 GMT.