About us

About us

David Heald 
(Professor of Public Sector Accounting)

David Heald specialises in public finances, government accounting and fiscal transparency, having advised Parliamentary Committees at Westminster and given evidence to Committees at Stormont, Cardiff Bay and Holyrood. He holds a chair in Public Sector Accounting in the Adam Smith Business School at the University of Glasgow. More information is available on his Business School and personal websites.  See also Google Scholar.

Gordon Marnoch 
(Reader in Public Policy, Ulster University)

Gordon’s main research interests are in health policy, governance of public services in the UK, the governance and management of policing, and the performance and evaluation of public services. In 2011 he co-chaired a cross-United Kingdom ESRC-funded seminar series which examined innovation in public services.

Tom Mullen 
(Professor of Law, University of Glasgow)

Tom’s main research interests are constitutional law and administrative law. He has spent much of the past few years researching the UK’s changing constitution including the issues of devolution, Scottish independence and the relationship of the UK and its constituent nations with the European Union. He was a founder member of the Scottish Constitutional Futures Forum (click here to link to SCFF website) which worked to bring academic expertise to a wider audience during the Scottish independence referendum campaign and after.

Ruth O’Donnell 
(Digital Engagement Officer, School of Law, University of Glasgow)

Iain Wright 
(Research Fellow, Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow)

Iain’s particular research interest is in Ireland’s electricity and gas sectors, having spent over a decade working in the fields of utility regulation and business change associated with the evolving market structures that development of competition in these markets required. He was Chair of the Single Electricity Market’s Modification Panel for five years and of industry body, the Electricity Association of Ireland, for one year.