Self-help resources

Abuse

Abuse is when one person (or occasionally group of people) seeks to gain power over and remove the agency of another person or persons.

This can take a number of forms including unwanted sexual remarks or contact, to domestic abuse (which can contain violence or threats of violence, emotional abuse social and financial control or sexual violence) and also bullying and harassment.

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Addiction: Alcohol

Alcohol abuse comes prior to alcohol dependence. Alcohol abuse is when a person has dangerous and unhealthy drinking habits (e.g. drinking every day or binge drinking).

Continuous alcohol abuse can lead to alcohol dependence or alcoholism, wherein a person is physically and mentally addicted to alcohol. Alcohol abuse and dependence could have a detrimental impact on health and wellbeing.

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Here are some information sheets and books which can help you learn a little more about this topic:

Do & try:

Here are some things you can try to help manage your symptoms:

Charities & societies:


Addiction: Drugs

Drug addiction is when a person compulsively seeks and uses drugs, despite harmful consequences.

Drug addiction is considered a brain disease as drugs have an impact on the brain, changing its structure and how it works. Drug addiction may have detrimental impact on how you behave.

Read & research:

Here are some information sheets and books which can help you learn a little more about this topic:

Do & try:

Here are some things you can try to help manage your symptoms:

Charities & societies:


Anger

Anger is a human and natural response to feeling attacked, threatened, insulted and frustrated.

Anger can be helpful and unhelpful and can become a problem when we regularly express anger through destructive and unhelpful behaviours; and when it is negatively impacting on overall mental and physical wellbeing.

If you or anyone you know is suffering from difficulties with aggression and is a risk to themselves and to others, it is important to seek support to learn how to cope with anger.

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Anxiety

Anxiety is a feeling that is associated with fear and worry. Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point in their lives, for example, feeling anxious before exams.

Anxiety is often experienced as having unhelpful thoughts related to threat and fear. Depending on the levels of anxiety, whether mild or severe, it can be helpful or unhelpful to us:

  • Mild anxiety would help us increase motivation, for example, to set up a study plan so that you have a structure for revision.
  • Severe anxiety, could result in decreased motivation and not acting at all, for example, avoiding exams because of a fear of failure.

When someone experiences severe anxiety, it is difficult to control their worries, leading to a constant feeling of worry and anxiety that could have a detrimental impact on daily life. Anxiety has an impact on how we see ourselves, others and our future.

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Here are some things you can try to help manage your symptoms:

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Assertiveness

Being assertive means that you can express your opinions and stand up for yourself and for others, calmly and positively, without being aggressive or confrontational.

It is the ability to acknowledge others opinions and yet express how you feel about topic of discussion/situation. 

It can be difficult to be assertive, however, if our self-esteem is low as this can lead to either jumping to the defence, in an aggressive or confrontational manner, or to backing down, allowing others to dominate the discussion/situation.

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Autism

Autism is a spectrum condition and is a lifelong developmental disorder that affects a person’s social interaction, communication, behaviour and interests.

It's caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Problems such as social communication and interaction can be recognised during early childhood. However, sometimes features may not become visible or noticeable until there is a significant change to the child’s situation. Even then, it may occur that ASD features were noticeable in children but remain undiagnosed and enter adulthood without ever being diagnosed.

It is important to know that services are available for you as an adult to get assessed for ASD. An ASD diagnosis can help a person and their social network to understand the condition better, gain a level of acceptance, and thereby altering life to manage the condition better.

Read & research

  • Mental health and Asperger syndrome
  • Research Autism publications
  • Bliss, Veronica. (2007). A Self-Determined Future With Asperger Syndrome: Solution Focused Approaches.
  • Howlin, Patricia. (2004). Autism and Asperger syndrome: preparing for adulthood. Routledge.
  • Lawson, Wendy. (2000). Life behind glass: a personal account of autism spectrum disorder.
  • Willey, Liane Holliday. (2001). Asperger syndrome in the family: redefining normal. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
  • Willey, Liane Holliday. (1999). Pretending to be normal: living with Asperger’s syndrome. Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
  • Mugsy.org - hints and tips on how to cope with daily life situations

Charities & societies:

  • The National Autistic Society & Helpline (for relatives, carers, friends and people with autism) Tel: 0808 800 4104 
  • Autism Network Scotland
  • Autism Resource Centre, c/o Centre for Sensory Impaired People, North West Social Work Services, 17 Gullane Street, Partick, Glasgow, G11 6AH (Tel: +44 (0) 141 276 5252)
  • The National Autistic Society Scotland, Central Chambers, First Floor, 109 Hope Street, Glasgow, G2 6LL (Tel: +44 (0) 141 221 8090)
  • Scottish Autism

Bereavement

The loss of someone close to you is a very sad and upsetting. Losing someone close to you might result in experiencing grief.

Everyone will suffer the loss of those close to us at some point in our lives. It takes time to cope with and adjust to your daily life again as the absence of the person will be felt causing you to have emotions related to grief which you would not usually experience prior to losing that someone.

Everyone grieves in different ways – some people are able to express themselves more and process grief related emotions differently to others.

There is no right or wrong way of experiencing grief. It is a sad and difficult time, however, know that there is help out there to help you cope with your experiences.

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Carers

You may be someone who has the responsibility of taking care of another person or people whilst also trying to take care of yourself. It is not always easy to juggle your life when you have this responsibility.

It is possible that you need some support to cope with the different aspects of your life along with your carer responsibilities, such as, financial support, practical support, managing your physical and mental health, balancing your work and studies, managing relationships, use of technology and equipment support, etc. 

You may need extra support to cope with the pressures of caring. We have some resources available that could be helpful for you.

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University Guidelines and Policies:

Student Carers' Policy

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Depression

Everyone goes through periods of low mood at some point in their lives. It is natural to have ups and downs and changes in mood in one’s day to day life.

It is important to know that low mood, when persistent for a long period of time, could have a detrimental impact on your everyday life. This is what is called depression.

Different people experience depression in different ways. The depressive period could occur in episodes and might be experienced as mild, moderate or severe depression.

Someone who has depression could be in low spirits, have a sense of hopelessness and helplessness, feel bad about himself/herself, not want to do things, and is unable to feel enjoyment or pleasure.

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Here are some things you can try to help manage your symptoms:

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Self-harm

Self-harm is when you hurt yourself because you are trying to cope with difficult feelings, overwhelming situations or distressing memories and experiences.

Self-harm is usually a means of finding short-term relief from overwhelming feelings and emotions. Although it is seen as a short-term unhelpful coping strategy, it could also bring up difficult emotions that could make you feel worse.

If you self-harm, it is important for you to know that you need to take care of your injuries and have access to first aid.

Emergency or crisis situation:

If you are concerned about your own or someone else's mental health you can contact:

You can also access the University support team 24/7 via Campus Security:

Tel: +44 (0) 141 330 4444 (ext. 4444)

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