Events 2014-15

Events 2014-15

3-7 Sep 2014: European Consortium for Political Research General Conference 2014

A Politics event

Date: Wed 3-7 Sep 2014
Time: 12:00
Venue: University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom

For full details please visit the conference website: www.gla.ac.uk/ecpr2014

 

5 Sep 2014: Roundtable Discussion “Eastern Partnership: Between Russia & the European Union”

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Fri 5 Sep 2014
Time:
Venue: Room 466, Gilbert Scott Building

Presenter: Suvi Salmenniemi, University of Turku, Finland

This roundtable event will take the form of a moderated discussion between leading experts in Russian and European politics. Following the recent signing of Association Agreements with Moldova, Georgia, and Ukraine, speakers will provide informed analysis of current political, social, and economic trends in terms of European integration within the Eastern Partnership countries. Focus will also be placed on the significant role of Russia and the various mechanisms of Russian influence in the region. In light of the current Ukraine crisis, the panel will consider to what extent the EU has ignored or responded to (legitimate?) Russian interests and what should now be done to ensure stability within and across the Eastern Partnership region.

Speakers include:

  • Dr András Rácz (Finnish Institution of International Affairs)
  • Mr Bruce Pannier (Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty)
  • Dr Samuel Greene (Kings College London)

All welcome.

This event is supported by CRCEES and Assessing Accession

For more information please email Ammon.Cheskin@glagsow.ac.uk

 

5-7 Sep 2014: Racism: From the Labour Movement to the Far-Right

A Sociology event

Date: Fri 5-7 Sep 2014
Time: 12:00
Venue: Western Infirmary Lecture Theatre

Conference website: http://racismconference14.wordpress.com

Register here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/racism-from-the-labour-movement-to-the-far-right-tickets-11857826077

Taking two overlapping developments as its starting point – namely the continuing mutation and expansion of racism into new ‘cultural’ forms, above all in the form of a virulent Islamophobia; andthe electoral consolidation of parties of the far-right, who are not always fascist, but committed to deeply reactionary positions on most social issues, above all in relation to migration – the scheduled papers will focus on such themes as:

  • Race, gender and class in the neoliberal workplace
  • The social basis of the populist far-right in Europe, including the racisms of such political formations
  • Refugees, asylum and migration
  • Racism, multiculturalism and citizenship in Europe, including the racialization of Muslims 
  • Imperialism and its legacies in Scotland; including anti-Irish racism and the employment inequalities faced by different racialized minority groups
  • Theorizing racism and anti-racism including historical perspectives on the sometimes convoluted relationship between anti-racism and the socialist Left

We are delighted to announce that the keynote lecture will be given by Professor Floya Anthias (University of East London) on ‘Intersectionality and the Struggles against Racism’. Professor Anthias’ research explores different forms of stratification, social hierarchy and inequality, and how they interconnect, paying specific attention to racism, diaspora and hybridity, multiculturalism, gender and migration, labour market disadvantages and class position.

There are also two exhibitions planned for the conference. The first draws on work carried out by Dr Sundari Anitha (University of Lincoln) and Professor Ruth Pearson (University of Leeds) entitledStriking Women. This celebrates the catalytic role played by South Asian women in two industrial disputes in the Greater London area – the strike at Grunwick between 1976 and 1978 and the dispute at Gate Gourmet that erupted in 2005. Through images, text and interviews, the exhibition locates these disputes in the wider context of South Asian women’s activism in the workplace.A second display – prepared by Honor Hania, the Subject Librarian for Sociology at the University of Glasgow – will present documents outlining the role played by Scotland, and especially Glasgow, in the British Empire. This exhibition will include images and texts which highlight and demonstrate Scotland’s connections to the slave trade and anti-slavery movements, as well as the University’s historical connections to Africa and the Caribbean. The display will also feature materials from the Glasgow University Library’s Black History Month exhibition.

The first day will conclude with two book launches. Wilf Sullivan, Head, Race Equality at the TUC will discuss Satnam Virdee’s new book, Racism, Class and the Racialized Outsider, while David Renton, Barrister at Garden Court Chambers will introduce Neil Davidson’s jointly edited collection, The Longue Duree of the Far-Right.

For further information please visit the conference website: http://racismconference14.wordpress.com

Contacts

  • Minna Liinpää: m.liinpaa.1@research.gla.ac.uk
  • Maureen McBride: m.mcbride.2@research.gla.ac.uk

 

9 Sep 2014: Choosing the Future: How Scotland’s Citizens Might Vote. Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

A Politics event

Date: Tue 9 Sep 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Sir Charles Wilson Building

Speaker: Professor John Curtice (Professor of Government at Strathclyde University and Honorary Stevenson Fellow)

This lecture continues the Stevenson Trust series of lectures: Scotland's Citizens: The Referendum and Beyond

Professor John Curtice will take us through the latest indications from the opinion polls. Informal reception afterwards.

Free and open to all members of staff and students of the University and members of the general public.

 

11 Sep 2014: Kicking the Life Back into a Dying Mutual Friend: A Letter from America on Independence. Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

A Politics event

Date: Thu 11 Sep 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Boyd Orr Lecture theatre 1

Speaker: Professor Niall Ferguson (Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University)

This lecture continues the Stevenson Trust series of lectures: Scotland's Citizens: The Referendum and Beyond

Professor Ferguson hails from Glasgow and has built an international reputation for his work. The publication in 2003 of 'Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World' cemented his reputation as an historian of global sweep. As this work indicates, Niall Ferguson remains committed to the continuation of the Union.

Free and open to all members of staff and students of the University and members of the general public.

 

15 Sep 2014: The Decline (and possibly imminent fall?) of the Anglo-Scottish Union, 1950-2014. Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

A Politics event

Date: Mon 15 Sep 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Boyd Orr Lecture theatre 1

Speaker: Professor Sir Tom Devine (Professor of History at Edinburgh University)

This lecture continues the Stevenson Trust series of lectures: Scotland's Citizens: The Referendum and Beyond

Professor Sir Tom Devine’s 'The Scottish Nation 1700-2000', published in 1999 and since updated to 2007, brought his work to a wider readership and established him as Scotland’s leading authority on its modern history. Tom Devine has recently declared himself in favour of Independence.

Free and open to all members of staff and students of the University and members of the general public.

 

16-17 Sep 2014: Stretching the Sociological Imagination: John Eldridge Festschrift Conference

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 16-17 Sep 2014
Time: 15:00
Venue: East Quad Lecture Theatre, University of Glasgow

This conference intends to honour and discuss the work inspired by the eminent sociologist: John Eldridge.  Eldridge was for many years both Professor of Sociology and Head of Department at the University of Glasgow and is a renowned figure in the discipline through his research; most notably his contribution to three areas.  The first of these is the sociology of work and industry.  Eldridge wrote or co-wrote many highly-influential texts in this field, such as Industrial Disputes, and Just Managing: Authority and Democracy in Industry (with Cressey and MacInnes),whilst also co-founding the Centre for Research in Industrial Democracy and Participation. The second is social theory where Eldridge has published key texts on thinkers such as Max Weber, Raymond Williams and C. Wright Mills.  The final is the sociology of media.  Eldridge was one of the founders of the Glasgow Media Group which continues to produce internationally-renowned research. His contributions can be found in multiple texts, including the path-breaking Bad News, as well as other important volumes produced by the Group.  In addition to this, he was also President of the British Sociological Association from 1979-1981 and central to discussions with the UK government which led to the reorganisation of the Economic and Social Research Council in 1983, after a threat to remove the ‘Social’ entirely from the title.  Throughout, Eldridge has had an intellectual debt to Mills’ conception of the sociological imagination, which inspires the title of this conference. Such a debt is demonstrated not just in his monograph on Mills, but in the many fertile theoretical arguments in his other works, as well as his much-loved teaching. Over the years Eldridge has been hugely admired by his students for his accessible and succinct formulations of sociological thought and we hope the conference will emulate this spirit.  In particular, a celebration of his work provides a valuable occasion to reflect on what it means to apply the sociological imagination today.

For further details, and to register, see: http://eldridgeconference2014.wordpress.com/

 

16 Sep 2014: Panel discussion: Pre-Referendum Special. Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

A Politics event

Date: Tue 16 Sep 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Sir Charles Wilson Building

Speaker: Professor Sir Tom Devine (Professor of History at Edinburgh University)

This lecture continues the Stevenson Trust series of lectures: Scotland's Citizens: The Referendum and Beyond

A panel discussion on the referendum, responding to audience questions. The panel comprises academic experts who remain neutral and seek only to offer analysis of the debate and the key issues. Informal reception afterwards.

Free and open to all members of staff and students of the University and members of the general public.

 

17 Sep 2014: The politics of therapeutic consumption: Insights from Russia

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 17 Sep 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Suvi Salmenniemi, University of Turku, Finland

This paper discusses the relationship between therapeutic technologies and political resistance. While modes of political governance are subject to increasing pressure globally, manifesting itself in the ‘crisis of democracy’, a sense of political disempowerment and the decline of the influence of ‘old’ social movements, the therapeutic industry of self-help and happiness is proliferating with an accelerating pace not only in the West but also in post-socialist societies and the Global South.

Previous research has suggested that therapeutic technologies depoliticize by promoting individualism, diminishing commitment to social institutions, and encouraging a withdrawal from collective forms of political resistance. This paper suggests that something more complex is afoot here. Drawing on interviews with consumers of self-help technologies in the Russian city of Saratov, the paper suggests that therapeutic technologies may also serve as vehicles of politicization. It argues, first, that therapeutic consumption in Russia is a distinctively communal practice, generating and maintaining social relations and communities rather than simply cultivating individualism. Secondly, it argues that therapeutic technologies and communities can serve as a locus and resource of political critique and engagement. It unravels the different layers and dimensions of politics: the politics of subjectivity with resistance to the normalizing power of therapeutic technologies and the complex negotiation of habitus vis-à-vis the shifting logics of social fields, and the ways in which therapeutic technologies are mobilized to criticize neoliberal capitalism and its conceptions of personhood and the social. The paper concludes by suggesting that we need to problematize the narrow conception of politics and resistance in order to better understand the dynamics of political struggles in contemporary world.

Biography

Suvi Salmenniemi is Associate of Professor of Sociology at the University of Turku in Finland. She specialises in political sociology, cultural studies, feminist and social theory, sociology of class and inequality and (post)socialism. Her ongoing research is a multi-sited ethnography on therapeutic technologies and the politics of happiness in Finland and Russia. She is the author of Democratization and Gender in Contemporary Russia (2008, Routledge) and the editor of Rethinking Class in Russia (2012, Ashgate). Her work has also appeared in British Journal of Sociology, Sociology, Europe-Asia Studies and International Sociology.

All welcome.

The CEES West Coast Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

23 Sep 2014: How Scotland’s Citizens Voted. Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

A Politics event

Date: Tue 23 Sep 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Sir Charles Wilson Building

Speaker: Professor John Curtice (Professor of Government at Strathclyde University and Honorary Stevenson Fellow)

This lecture continues the Stevenson Trust series of lectures: Scotland's Citizens: The Referendum and Beyond

Professor John Curtice will join us again to offer an analysis of the vote. Informal reception afterwards.

Free and open to all members of staff and students of the University and members of the general public.

 

29 Sep 2014: Conflicting relations: Adolescent girls and violent behavior’

A Sociology event

Date: Mon 29 Sep 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 717, Adam Smith Building

Speaker: Dr Judith Ryder, St John’s University, New York, SCCJR Visiting Fellow

Dr. Ryder has a broad background in criminology with a concentration in violence and trauma among adolescents. Her scholarship focuses on young people in particular social situations deeply stratified by gender, race and class, considered within psychosocial and feminist theoretical frameworks. She is the author of Girls and Violence, Tracing the Roots of Criminal Behavior (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2013).

Abstract: This seminar explores manifestations of violence in girls’ lives through the lens of significant early relationships and resultant internal conflicts.  It investigates connections between violence perpetuated by and against adolescent girls, and the importance of locating girls’ interpretations of violence in the context of dynamic relational processes. Analyzing interview data from teenagers charged with assault or robbery and remanded to a New York State residential youth facility, Dr. Ryder  integrates psychosocial theory concepts, particularly attachment theory and the effects of chronic trauma, to construct a theoretical model of the dynamics underlying girls’ anti-social behaviors. 

For further information about SCCJR events visit www.sccjr.ac.uk/events/

 

1 Oct 2014: Social Stratification in China

A School-wide event

Date: Wed 1 Oct 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Room 201, John McIntyre Building

Glasgow-Nankai Lecture series

Speaker: Professor Zhu Guanglei, Vice President of Nankai University in Tianjin

This lecture will give historical background to stratification in China, what it means, how it affects and is related to the poverty gap, social progress and political development, and what this means going forward.

For more information/to book your free ticket, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-change-and-developing-trend-of-stratification-in-china-tickets-13259143455

Please note this lecture will be delivered in Chinese with a live English translation.

 

1 Oct 2014: Taste and the Everyday

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 1 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Prof. Ben Highmore (University of Sussex)

In this talk I will try and do two things. First I will look at various theories about taste and the way that the term has come to primarily describe a subject’s positioning within a stratified society. The most influential example here is the social thought of Pierre Bourdieu, where taste is a cultural practice that is performed as a symbolic activity. Second I will investigate the possibility of thinking about taste as a material and sensual activity of intimate world-making, and thereby of offering an alternative way of thinking about taste, one that isn’t limited to the symbolic realm. My argument is that it is this alternative approach that is more sensitive to the role that taste plays in everyday life.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

2 Oct 2014: This House believes Stop and Search should be put on a statutory footing

A School-wide event

Date: Thu 2 Oct 2014
Time: 18:30
Venue: Assembly Hall, Police Scotland, Pitt Street

Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research

Scottish Association for the Study of Offending (SASO) Glasgow Branch, Opening Debate 2014-15 Session.

For further details:

http://www.sastudyoffending.org.uk/attachments/article/165/Glasgow%20Opening%20Debate%20-%20021014.pdf

 

9 Oct 2014: Homosexual law reform and Scottish religious institution

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 9 Oct 2014
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Jeff Meek (University of Glasgow)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

15 Oct 2014: Just Emotions? Rituals of Restorative Justice

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 15 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Meredith Rossner (LSE)

Restorative justice scholars and practitioners offer a compelling argument for its widespread implementation, citing the potential to repair the harm of a criminal offense and reduce offending.  At the same time, there is evidence that it can have no effect or even make things worse. My work attempts to address these conflicting findings by analysing the micro level dynamics of how restorative justice encounters work as a unique form of justice ritual.  This talk will examine the main findings of my recent book on rituals in restorative justice, presenting a theory of restorative justice that focuses on the dynamics of the encounter, participants' emotional, linguistic, and bodily rhythms, and the development of solidarity or division within the group.  The approach involves a contrasting systematic empirical program, including a combination of qualitative interviews, detailed observations of discourse, face and demeanour, and quantitative analysis of systematically observed conferences.  I offer an explanation of how rituals unfold dynamically in space in time, and how these emotional trajectories may impact subsequent offending.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

22 Oct 2014: Communism's Shadow: The Effect of Communist Legacies on Post-Communist Political and Economic Attitudes

A Politics event

Date: Wed 22 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 718, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Joshua Tucker (New York University)

Seminar arranged in association with Central and East European Studies

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

23 Oct 2014: The Challenge of Good Citizenship Today: Memory, Hope, and the Current Crisis of Trust

A Politics event

Date: Thu 23 Oct 2014
Time: 18:00
Venue: Sir Charles Wilson Building (corner of Gibson St and University Ave)

Stevenson Trust for Citizenship Lecture Series 2012-14

Speaker: Professor Werner Jeanrond (Master of St Benet’s Hall at Oxford University and formerly Professor of Divinity at Glasgow University)

Professor Werner Jeanrond is a leading theologian, one who is always concerned to relate matters of faith to questions of everyday life. In his lecture, Professor Jeanrond will address themes which occupy many of us at this time as we reflect on the lessons to be drawn from the dreadful events which commenced one hundred years ago. As we reflect on the crisis of that time, and on more contemporary crises, we seem to be cast between memory and hope. As Professor Jeanrond says: “There is no innocent memory. What role might hope play in this situation? How could citizens retrieve hope as a resource for facing an uncertain future? How could just institutions be built? In sum, how much and what kind of memory and how much and what kind of hope are necessary for a healthy society? And how can each one of us contribute to a society characterised by justice, mercy and radical hope?”

This Stevenson lecture is offered as being part of the University's commemoration of WW1. The lecture is followed by an informal reception.

Stevenson Lectures are free and open to members of the general public. School parties are asked to contact the Stevenson Trust in advance.

For further details, visit our website: www.glasgow.ac.uk/stevensontrust or email: stevensontrust@glasgow.ac.uk

 

27 Oct 2014: Terrorist Havens, Pirate Capitals and Bandit Country: The internal and external discursive framing of violent conflict – early results from a research project

A Politics event

Date: Mon 27 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Roger MacGinty (Peace and Conflict Studies, Manchester University) 

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

28 Oct 2014: 'To Exploit a Larger World to Conquer': C.L.R. James's Intellectual Conquest of Imperial Britain

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 28 Oct 2014
Time: 17:15
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Dr. Christian Høgsbjerg (York)

Joint seminar with Centre for the Study of Socialist Theory and Movements

Together with other critical Pan-Africanist figures such as his fellow compatriot George Padmore, the black Trinidadian revolutionary socialist - and former cricket correspondent for the Glasgow Herald - C.L.R. James led from the front as an ideological agitator in the fight against British imperialist mythology and propaganda during the 1930s: “Traditional England was under fire. And it was the regular habit of a number of us colonials to go to public lectures and meetings of some of the most celebrated lecturers and speakers in England and at question time and during discussion tear them to pieces.” This paper will explore how James - a black colonial subject turned from an identification with ''imperial Britishness'' to a more radical transnational identification with black people internationally – militant Pan-Africanism – after arriving in depression-hit Britain in 1932, and orientated from liberal humanism towards revolutionary socialism.  It will then examine how James mediated his revolutionary Marxist and Pan-Africanist agitation in 1930s Britain over questions such as Mussolini’s invasion of Ethiopia as well as writing his masterful work recovering the world historic significance of the Haitian Revolution, The Black Jacobins (1938).  If Eric Williams could later claim, “I had come, seen and conquered—at Oxford!” when he graduated with first-class honours in 1935, this paper will suggest that with the publication of The Black Jacobins, James could with equal legitimacy have claimed that he had come, seen, and intellectually conquered the larger world of imperial Britain.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

29 Oct 2014: Conflict in the Congo: Responses from the International Community

A Politics event

Date: Wed 29 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Senate Room, Main Building

If you would like to attend this event, please register on the Eventbrite site: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/conflict-in-the-congo-responses-from-the-international-community-tickets-13674373419

Co-hosted by Glasgow Human Rights Network (GHRN), Glasgow Global Security Network (GGSN) and University of Glasgow's Coalition for a 'Conflict-Free' Campus

For over two decades the Democratic Republic of Congo has been plagued by violence and instability with multiple armed groups fighting to control local populations and mineral resources. This event aims to explore some of the international efforts to bring an end to this conflict.

Speakers:

Dr. Kurt Mills, University of Glasgow

Percy Patrick, Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund

TBC, Global Witness

Bandi Mbubi, Congo Calling

 

29 Oct 2014: Weibo

A School-wide event

Date: Wed 29 Oct 2014
Time: 16:30
Venue: Room 904, Adam Smith Building

Scottish Centre for China Research Postgraduate Network seminar

Rotating Chair: Xiaonan Yang, x.yang.1@research.gla.ac.uk

For more information please email sccr_pgn@yahoo.com.

 

29 Oct 2014: Not without my territory? Pros and cons for territorial and non-territorial protection of minorities (The case of Hungary)

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 29 Oct 2014
Time:
Venue: Room 1103, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Mate Paksy (Balassi Institute, Hungary)

This Work in Progress seminar critically engages with the work of Karl Renner and Otto Bauer and their theories of  a clear “de-territorialization” of minority groups. Under their influence certain contemporary Western scholars suggest that Central European countries like Hungary, Romania or Slovakia should follow them when implementing the territorially blind principle of personality (i.e. looking to groups of individuals, irrespective of location) instead of federal-territorial autonomy.       

In my presentation first I will sketch the origins and contexts of Renner and Bauer’s theory that fits within the German-Austrian tradition of the Allgemeine Staatslehre. Many early scholars in this field were originally lawyers. Debates between “non-territorial vs territorial” approaches therefore appear not only in political science, but in legal science, too.

Finally I will discuss the arguments of those scholars who consider territorial autonomy to represent better practise in general and especially suitable for Hungarian minorities in particular. I will conclude that the principle of territoriality will always preserve its priority over the principle of personality. Instead of “de-territorialization”, the social scientist should try to understand that a given territory is not simply a neutral geographical unity, but a particular space where—irrespectively of its ethnical composition—the political community lives.

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

29 Oct 2014: Tragedy in the Commons: Animal Welfare Vs Libertarian Activism Online

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 29 Oct 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Adam Reed (St. Andrews)

This paper operates through a juxtaposition of ethnographic examples from my anthropological work in Britain. The contrast is prompted by a symposium invitation to consider how ‘commoning’ arises and for whom. It is not, however, a straightforward account of what is ‘meant by the commons today’. The hesitation is due to the fact that I never encountered the term as an ethnographic category, nor saw it deployed as an explicit metaphor among the peoples I worked with. While they had much to say about the ‘implications of things held, managed and imagined “in common”’, no one directly invoked the historical language of public goods. In what follows, the metaphor is therefore mine; the essay is in part an exercise in reading ‘the commons’ back into popular talk and action around what was, is or ought to be conceived as ‘common’ between them. My ethnographic examples are chosen because in these cases discussions appear to coincide with dramatic moments of identified expansion or shrinkage of common worlds. I am interested in the degree to which ‘tragedy’ may be attached not just to the contraction of what is held in common, but to the very practice of commoning itself, or imagining oneself sharing something in common with another.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

30 Oct 2014: Advertising in Austerity Britain, 1947-1950's

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 30 Oct 2014
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: David Clayton (University of York)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

31 Oct 2014: Urbanism Without Effort

An Urban Studies event

Date: Fri 31 Oct 2014
Time: 15:00
Venue: Lecture Room B, Boyd Orr Building, University of Glasgow

Part of our mini season of prominent US scholars.

Presenter: Charles Wolfe (a Seattle-based land use, property and redevelopment lawyer, affiliate faculty member at the University of Washington, and author of Urbanism Without Effort)

Organised jointly with the Urban Design Studies Unit, Department of Architecture, University of Strathclyde.

Charles Wolfe’s work on Urbanism Without Effort explores the idea that to create vibrant, sustainable urban areas, we must first understand what happens naturally when people congregate in cities. Wolfe defends the perspective that the underlying rationales for urban policy, planning and regulation are best understood from a historical perspective and in a better understanding of the everyday uses of urban space. Successful community, he argues, is among the first principles of what makes humans feel happy, and therefore city dwellers invariably celebrate environments where and when they can coexist safely, in a mutually supportive way. Wolfe believes such celebration is most interesting when it occurs spontaneously—seemingly without effort. He contends it is critical to first isolate these spontaneous and latent examples of successful urban land use, before applying any prescriptive government policies or initiatives.

Charles (Chuck) R. Wolfe, M.R.P., J.D.

Chuck provides a unique perspective about cities as both a long time writer about urbanism worldwide and as an attorney in Seattle, where he focuses on land use and environmental law. In particular, his work involves the use of sustainable development techniques and innovative land use regulatory tools on behalf of both the private and public sectors. He is also an Affiliate Associate Professor in the College of Built Environments at the University of Washington and an avid traveller, photographer and writer. He contributes regularly on urban development topics for several publications including The Atlantic Cities, The Atlantic, The Huffington Post, Grist, seattlepi.com, and Crosscut.com. He blogs at myurbanist.com.

 

5 Nov 2014: Russia and Crimea: a perspective from below

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 5 Nov 2014
Time:
Venue: Room 407A, Boyd Orr Building

Presenter: Eleanor Knott (London School of Economics)

"In this talk I will discuss the findings and analysis of my current research where I analyse relations between Crimea and Russia from a bottom-up perspective. I will draw on the approach of everyday nationalism to look at the lived experience of this relationship using data collected from fieldwork in Crimea (2012, 2013). In the presentation I will focus on everyday engagement with Russia through the lens of meanings and practices:

1.           Meanings: What does it mean to be Russian in Crimea?

2.           Practices: How are Russian policies practised in Crimea?

In terms of meanings, I look at how being Russian is given meaning, experienced and/or subverted. In terms of practices, I will discuss both everyday engagement with Russian citizenship, where none of those I had interviewed had acquired Russian citizenship, and practices of Russia’s Compatriot Policy. I will use this analysis, to gauge the interaction between these meanings and practices with ideas about territorial configuration, politically vis-à-vis Crimea’s relationship with Russia and Ukraine.

The presentation will argue that in the years preceding Crimea’s annexation by Russia in 2014, there was a fractured understanding of what it meant to be Russian, a lack of interest in engaging with Russia as a kin-state, and a lack of secessionist sentiment."

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

11 Nov 2014: The Stigma Doctrine: Social and Political Economies of Inequality in Post-Welfare Britain

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 11 Nov 2014
Time: 17:15
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Dr. Imogen Tyler (Lancaster)

Joint seminar with Centre for the Study of Socialist Theory and Movements

Extending work begun in Revolting Subjects: Social Abjection and Resistance in Neoliberal Britain (2013), this paper will outline my new research project on the social and political function of stigma in ‘post-welfare’ Britain. In The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism (2007), Naomi Klein details the ways in which ‘the policy trinity’ of neoliberalism, ‘the elimination of the public sphere, total liberation for corporations and skeletal social spending’ has been enabled through the invention and/or exploitation of crises, be they natural disasters, terrorist attacks or global economic recession. My new project, The Stigma Doctrine, revises Klein’s analysis by researching the claim made by the Loïc Wacquant, and extended in Tom Slater’s recent work on territorial stigma, that neoliberalism is characterised by ‘heightened stigmatization in daily life and public discourse’ (Wacquant, 2010). Focusing on the (re)production of stigma, this project aims to develop an account of the ways in which neoliberal modes of government operate not only by capitalizing upon ‘shocks’ but through the production and mediation of stigma. In this paper I will outline and illustrate aspects of the five aims of this new research project: 1) to develop a new theoretical account of function of stigma in the context of the post-welfare consensus; 2) to examine the inter-play between stigma and growing inequalities (economic, social and cultural); 3) to develop new methodological approaches to the study of stigma; 4) to explore the policy implications of The Stigma Doctrine with policy practitioners, artists and activists; and 5) to deepen public understanding of the social and political role of stigma in generating a post-welfare consensus, and in maintaining and reproducing inequalities.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

12 Nov 2014: Anti-nuclear movements in the Eastern Europe 2006-2013

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 12 Nov 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Ekaterina Tarasova (Södertörn University, Sweden)

Since the first half of 2000s the world society has been observing the expansion of national nuclear energy programs in a number of countries. This expansion is often referred to as “Nuclear Renaissance” by the nuclear power industry. This development has been accompanied by the trend in public opinion showing considerable positive attitudes towards nuclear energy in these countries. Since the issue of nuclear power has been actively debated in the public sphere the question of what is the public reaction to these new nuclear energy policies arises. It becomes crucial to scrutinize how these changes in discourse on nuclear energy shape the deliberation about nuclear energy as well as contentious actions. This paper approaches anti-nuclear movements through the analytical framework of discursive opportunity structure.

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

13 Nov 2014: The Making of the Modern British Family? The Suburban Semi and the Emergence of "Modern"

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 13 Nov 2014
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Peter Scott (Reading)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

17 Nov 2014: Residential Concentration, Ethnicity and Party Competition Effects on the Representation of Immigrant-Origin Minorities at the Local Level in Spain

A Politics event

Date: Mon 17 Nov 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Santiago Perez-Nievas (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid)

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

19 Nov 2014: Challenges of the EU’s Eastern Partnership

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 19 Nov 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Dr Margarita Šešelgytė (University of Vilnius, Lithuania)

European Neighbourhood policy (ENP) was launched in 2004 to enhance relations with the countries across the expanded boarders after “big bang” enlargement and to ensure stability and security in the neighbourhood. Based on its own historical experience the EU has chosen to do this through the Europeanization process by extending a European model of governance to the neighbouring countries “to promote a ring of well governed countries around its Eastern and Southern borders”. A new advanced version of ENP for the Eastern neighbours - Eastern Partnership (EaP) was launched in 2009. It had more individualistic approach, more ambitious goals and in 2013 Vilnius summit had to culminate in signing and initialling of  Association Treaties between the EU and the most successful Eastern neighbourhood countries. However with Ukraine’s retreat and major security crisis which has developed subsequently it might be argued that ENP failed to achieve its main goal. Instead of ensuring stability and security at the Eastern borders the EU engagement has directly or indirectly provoked a major security crisis since the end of the Cold war. Why has EaP failed?  What lessons could be drawn from the crisis in Ukraine for the future? One of the points of criticism argues that due to the anxiety of the EU not to provoke Russia – as the legitimate player in the Eastern neighbourhood - the EU was concentrating too much on the low politics goals, thereby diminishing its influence and hampering the results. The other one claims, that becoming too active in the high politics with no sufficient instruments to support it, the EU contributed to the destabilization of the region.  There are other important dilemma’s that the EU has to address in order to be successful in the neighbourhood:  how to effectively address hard security hostile behaviour with soft security measures, how to devise a strategy based on positive sum attitude to interact with the player which sees the situation from the zero sum point of view, finally, how to accumulated political will in the neighbourhood countries for long term and painful reforms.

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

20 Nov 2014: Greater Development Issues in Indonesia : Bridging Social  and Economic Empowerment

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Thu 20 Nov 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Professor Bambang Shergi Laksmono (University of Indonesia)

The paper intends to briefly highlight the meaning of the shifting concepts of development and policies on poverty in Indonesia. This  will  entail the shift from the Trilogi Pembangunan of the Suharto Era towards the Pro-Growth, Pro-Poor,  Pro Job strategy adopted in the Reformasi Era. The government has outlined a neat grid  of 4 layer quantile target groups that match with specific and tailored programs. Just how effective are these concepts?  How effective is the multi-sectoral  approach, usually hampered by ego-sectoralism. And how effective are the programs in the  context of the complexities related to  the family situation and livelihood of the urban or rural poor? Broad dimensions of governance will also be explained. The paper ends with the introduction of an alternative poverty analytical framework that provide a better understanding of the need to  integrate economic and social  empowerment.

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

26 Nov 2014: An Intersectional Approach to Analysing Intercultural Communication in Health Care Settings: Findings from Glasgow

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 26 Nov 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Teresa Piacentini (Glasgow)

How do health care providers respond to increased and multidimensional diversification?  What does this mean for effective intercultural communication in health care settings, in both clinical settings and the community?  In this paper I will explore how increased diversity challenges traditional models of communication in health care provision that have largely focused on language as the main barrier to accessing services. In this paper, I empirically engage with theories of intersectionality and super-diversity to ground an analysis of experiences of intercultural communication in interpreter-mediated health care settings in Glasgow. Since the 1990s, the city has experienced unanticipated demographic shifts due to the wider context of rapidly increasing intra-European mobility, an increasing number of migrants who are permanently or temporarily settled in the Scotland, and that the city is the primary UK dispersal area for asylum seekers outside of London.  This diversity is revealed not just in terms of more ethnicities but in other factors and multiple variables of difference in the immigration status, age, education, socio-economic background, and of course language of new migrants, all of which present a number of challenges to the practices and experiences of health-care delivery in intercultural and multi-lingual contexts.  Although a super-diversity perspective is relatively novel in health research, multiple factors such as language, ethnicity, age, class and gender co-condition health and integration outcomes are well-evidenced.  Presenting different perspectives from health care practitioners, interpreters and service users, I aim to firstly explore the value of the super-diversity perspective to this study, and secondly move beyond a simplistic focus on language barriers to unpack the ways in which health outcomes are co-conditioned by intersecting migratory, ethnicity and socio-demographic variables.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Matt.Dawson@glasgow.ac.uk

 

26 Nov 2014: Ottoman Heritage in the West Balkans: Syncretic Versus Binary Narrative

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 26 Nov 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Dr Senija Čaušević (SOAS, University of London)

The presentation will elaborate upon the binary effects of the normalising discourse of 'Europeanness' and the symbolic violence it may wreak through the ideology and its subsequent consumption in the 'post-Ottoman' Balkans. We investigate the interpretation of Ottoman heritage in the West Balkans in order not only to enhance the possibility of deeper understanding of shared history and identity amongst the country’s people, but also to highlight the significance of wider Ottoman context as important markers of ways of being European that need not depend upon binary spatial divisions of ‘East and West’ or ‘Christendom and Islam’. We note, however, the intersection of the utility of that binary both for certain strains of ethno-nationalist opinions in the West Balkans, as well as a commercial heritage sector driven to offer the country up in a familiar, consumable narrative.

All welcome.

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

27 Nov 2014: What’s Bigger Than The Coming Age Wave? Then Why Are We Ignoring It?

An Urban Studies event

Date: Thu 27 Nov 2014
Time: 15:00
Venue: Lecture Room B, Boyd Orr Building, University of Glasgow

Part of our mini season of prominent US scholars.

Presenter: Dr. Sandra Rosenbloom (Professor of Planning, The University of Texas at Austin and Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Planning Association)

Organised jointly with the Urban Big Data Centre.

Most industrial countries are rapidly aging; their populations are turning “up-side-down”—that is, they will have more people over 50 than under 20.  Also called a “silver tsunami” the changing demographics of the population in countries from the United States to the United Kingdom, Sweden to Spain will affect almost all aspects of society. The so-called dependency ratio will change drastically—there will be a smaller number of younger working people who pay the taxes that finance services for the aged, as well as fewer children and grandchildren to provide family support to older relatives. 

Older people, whatever their income or assets, generally spend less than they did when younger; when they do spend they buy services more than goods, health care more than recreation. These changing market demands will alter the entire base of the economy. And unlike previous generations, older people are far less likely to move on retirement; increasingly they age in place in communities not suited to their needs, and over time, to their increasing fragility and disability. Moreover today in many countries 1 out of 4 or 5 drivers is over 65, 1 out of 20 are over 80.

Dr. Rosenbloom will outline the many common socio-demographic trends facing industrial countries and identify the policy concerns that should engage those planning the future of our cities and our economies.  Only some of these concerns are related to social justice issues; while some older people lack resources, particularly older single women and those from BME communities, many older people have sufficient resources—if their homes, neighborhoods, commercial activities, social and recreational services, and health care opportunities were responsive to their needs. No single person, no matter how wealthy, can change the physical and emotional barriers that many cities pose to healthy and productive aging. Unless we act now, our societies may deprive themselves of the substantial contributions that healthy older people can make as volunteers, part-time workers, grandparents, mentors, and caretakers for other older people.

 

28 Nov 2014: Selma James: Women, Race and Class: The Fight for Real Equality

A Sociology event

Date: Fri 28 Nov 2014
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Selma James will speak on 'Women, Race and Class: The Fight for Real Equality'

James is a women's rights and antiracist campaigner and author of The Power of Women & the Subversion of the Community; Women, the Unions and Work, or What Is Not To Be Done; Sex, Race & Class; Marx and Feminism; Strangers & Sisters: Women, Race and Immigration and other studies and interventions. Raised in a movement household, she joined CLR James’s Johnson-Forest Tendency at age fifteen, and from 1958 to 1962, she worked with him in the movement for Caribbean federation and independence. In 1972, she founded the International Wages for Housework Campaign, and in 2000 she helped launch the Global Women's Strike, which she coordinates. She coined the word 'unwaged' to describe the caring work women do, and it has since entered the English language to describe all who work without wages, on the land, in the home, in the community, and more. In 1975 she became the first spokeswoman of the English Collective of Prostitutes. She is a founding member of the International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network (2008). Selma James addresses the power relations within the working class movement, and how to organize across sectors despite divisions of sex, race, and class, South and North.

This event is co-hosted with African Caribbean Cultures Glasgow and the Centre for the Study of Socialist Theory & Movements

 

4 Dec 2014: European Détente and national economic interests: British business, the Foreign Office, and the UK Eastern policy

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 4 Dec 2014
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Presenter: Angela Romano (University of Glasgow)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

5 Dec 2014: Out There anthology celebration

A School-wide event

Date: Fri 5 Dec 2014
Time: 17:30
Venue: Room 101, 5 University Gardens

The Creative Writing programme, in association with the Gender & Sexualities Forum, are holding end of semester drinks and an event celebrating the Out There anthology.

Readers:

Paul Brownsey

Elizabeth Reeder

Louise Welsh

John Smiths Bookstall.

Out There, edited by Zoë Strachan, is a bold and challenging anthology of LGBT writing featuring some of the UK’s leading writers.

In the year that Scotland votes on independence from the rest of the UK, Freight Books brings a new and definitive anthology of poetry and prose writing from Scotland’s leading and emerging LGBT writers, including the likes of Ali Smith, Louise Welsh, Jackie Kay, Ronald Frame, Toni Davidson, Kerry Hudson, Val McDermid, Damian Barr and many others. The writing will be as provocative, thoughtful, moving and as fully-charged with energy as one would expect from the country’s celebrated community of LGBT artists. Edited by award-winning novelist Zoë Strachan.

'This sophisticated and mature volume does a great deal more than simply tackle the heterosexual viewpoint that dominates most Scottish literary work, especially in very male-dominated stories. The short stories, poems and non-fiction collected here all put lesbian women and gay men at the centre of society and the centre of the story. But they do so in such a casual and easeful way that it almost feels as though the centre of society and the centre of the story are a place they have always occupied.' Sunday Herald

Our readers all have associations with Glasgow University. Paul was a lecturer in Philosophy here, and founded the LGBT Society; Elizabeth is co-convenor of the Creative Writing Programme, and Louise is a graduate of the Programme and former Writer in Residence.

 

18 Dec 2014: The Russo-American Relationship: Through the Lens of the Cohen Papers

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Thu 18 Dec 2014
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Presenter: Darren Reid is the inaugural Cohen Research Associate in the Cohen Institute for Leadership and Public Service at the University of Maine. He graduated from the University of Glasgow in 2013 with an MRes in Global Security.

The contemporary Russo-American relationship has reached a nadir similar to the height of the Cold War. The optimism of the early post-Cold War period has now completely evaporated, and the prospect for a genuine, substantial, productive, and strong relationship between the United States and Russia now seems far away. What explains this atrophy of the post-Cold War Russo-American relationship? The paper asserts that in order to understand the present, one must look to the past. It applies the notion of what’s past is prologue to the study of contemporary US-Russian relations. The utilization of the University of Maine’s Cohen Papers as primary research material allows for new perspectives and analysis on a relationship that has dominated international relations since the beginning of the twentieth century.

This seminar draws on work done for the University of Maine’s Cohen Papers project consisting of three separate research agendas: (1) What’s past is prologue: Understanding Contemporary Russo-American Relations; (2) Loose Nukes: Russia’s Domestic Instability and the Birth of Putinism; and (3) Two Birds, One Stone: America’s Response to Soviet Espionage in the United Nations. These three research agendas explore specific periods in Russo-American Cold War history that help elucidate on the current state of the relationship.

The presentation begins by introducing attendees to the William S. Cohen Papers, which are being utilized throughout this project as primary research materials. After discussing the research highlighted above, Darren will take some time to discuss his experiences (in a more generic context) after graduating from the MSc/MRes Global Security program at the University of Glasgow and life as a research associate in North America.

Information on the Cohen papers can be found at: http://library.umaine.edu/cohen/

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

16 Jan 2015: Childcare provision in deprived neighbourhoods: New York and Glasgow

An Urban Studies event

Date: Fri 16 Jan 2015
Time: 15:00
Venue: Lecture Room B, Boyd Orr Building, University of Glasgow

Part of our mini season of prominent US scholars.

Presenter: Professor Peter Brandon (Dept of Sociology, State University of New York at Albany

Organised jointly with the Urban Big Data Centre.

 

19 Jan 2015: Looking Good For Election Day: Do Perceptions of Attractiveness Predict Electoral Success?"

A Politics event

Date: Mon 19 Jan 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Caitlin Milazzo (University of Nottingham)

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

21 Jan 2015: Considering Emma: Queer Feminist History and Affective Method

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 21 Jan 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Prof. Clare Hemmings (LSE)

My recent work on ‘feminist stories’ has drawn me towards thinking through Emma Goldman’s significance for contemporary gender and sexual politics. Goldman was an anarchist activist and thinker (1869-1940) who spent her life engaged in these question, but who did not identify as feminist; who was as insistent on the centrality of women’s emancipation to revolution as she was on the limits of the franchise. I am intrigued about what kind of history of feminist theory and practice might flourish if Goldman were to be included in that history, but without needing to reframe her as a feminist first in order to do so. I find Goldman helpful in thinking through this tension today, since a claim of ‘not being a feminist, but…’, particularly in young women, tends to be dismissed simply as apolitical or as a sign of the waning significance of a hard-fought for feminism, rather than approached as part of how people have long negotiated their dissatisfaction with gendered and sexual norms. Might Goldman help me to think through a contemporary feminist politics that does not rely on a feminist subject (of whatever gender), or endorse nostalgia for clearer feminist times order to make its claims?

Co-hosted with the Gender and Sexualities Forum

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

22 Jan 2015: 'Hybridised' Accounting in the Victorian Construction Industry: George Gilbert Scott's Rebuilding of Glasgow University, 1867-1872

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 22 Jan 2015
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Sam McKinstry (University of West of Scotland)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

29 Jan 2015: Invisible men? Ageing, masculinity and intergenerational relationships, 1870-1914

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 29 Jan 2015
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Julie-Marie Strange (University of Manchester)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

4 Feb 2015: From data to wisdom? Spatial data visualisation as a policy tool

An Urban Studies event

Date: Wed 4 Feb 2015
Time: 17:15
Venue: Yudowitz Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical School Building

Speaker: Dr Alasdair Rae (University of Sheffield)

Dr Rae's work focuses on the current vogue for big data visualisation and its potential usefulness as a tool to guide, inform and promote public policy.

In this talk he will focus on the much-cited links between data, knowledge, information and wisdom as a way to frame the debate around the usefulness of big data visualisation. The objective is to provoke critical thinking on the ways in which big data visualisation is currently used in an urban context and how we might do it better.

A drinks reception will directly follow the seminar and Q&A session.

The seminar is free and open to the public, but registration is recommended via Eventbrite: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sdn-lecture-series-201415-tickets-13845374889

Organisers:

Prof Vonu Thakuriah, Urban Big Data Centre

Prof Marian Scott, Glasgow Sustainable Development Network

 

4 Feb 2015: Germany as a Kin-State Post 1949: Changing Perspectives

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 4 Feb 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Speaker: Professor Karl Cordell (Plymouth School of Government)

Abstract: In this presentation I chart the changing nature of Germany’s kin-state ‘obligation’ since the foundation of the Federal Republic in 1949.  The Federal Republic of Germany was initially faced with several problems, not the least of which was how to accommodate and integrate millions of refugees from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.  Initially, I show how the policy choices pursued by the administrations of Konrad Adenauer of the Christian Democratic Union, although successful in terms of domestic politics had serious negative ramifications with regard to relations with its relations with Eastern Europe.  It was only in 1969 and the coming to power of Willy Brandt and the Social Democratic Party of Germany that the situation began to change.  The middle part of the presentation deals with such changes.  In turn the latter part of the presentation deals with the position in Germany of Aussiedler (re-settlers), Spätaussiedler (late re-settlers), from the 1980s and particularly since the collapse of communism in Europe in 1990.  The paper concludes by contrasting the former role of Germany as a kin-state with its contemporary role as a kin-state.  The paper also considers the controversial role of the Bund der Vertriebene (Federation of Expellees) whose stance and policies still cause controversy despite the fact that the events that caused such misery and hardship occurred over 60 years ago.

Bio: Karl Cordell is professor of Politics at the Plymouth School of Government. He has published widely on ethnic politics in East/Central Europe and is co-editor of the journal Ethnopolitics.

This seminar series is supported by the University of Glasgow MacFie Bequest: http://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography/?id=WH0079&type=P

For more information on the CEES Seminar series, please contact Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk.

 

4 Feb 2015: The New Middle Class from Vanguard to Social Neoliberalism

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 4 Feb 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Neil Davidson (Glasgow)

During the Occupy movement one of its key slogans drew attention to the conflict of interests between the 1% and the 99%. While this was undoubtedly effective in identifying the relative smallness of the global ruling class, it was sociologically quite misleading in suggesting a degree of common interest among the 99%. Neoliberalism, like all earlier variants of capitalism, could not have survived without a social base much wider than the groups constitutive of the 1%. As is usually the case, a section of the middle classes were key, in this case the group variously referred to as the salariat, the technical-managerial strata, or the New Middle Class (NMC). This paper examines the shifting basis of NMC support for the neoliberal project as it moved its vanguard 'transformationalist' phase, associated with Thatcher, Reagan and Pinochet, to its social 'consolidationist' phase, associated with Blair, Clinton and, in Scottish terms, Salmond. I will attempt to show that the key achievement of the latter for capital was the way it generated previously resistant public sector and cultural NMC support for the economic aspects of neoliberalism, mainly by emphasizing social questions and particularly those concerning personal identity. I will conclude by exploring the extent to which this support has been eroded by the crisis which began in 2007-8.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

6 Feb 2015: From 'Broder' to 'Don': Methodological Reflections on Longitudinal Gang Research in Nicaragua, 1996-2014

An Urban Studies event

Date: Fri 6 Feb 2015
Time: 15:00
Venue: Room 250, Gilbert Scott Conference Suite, Main Building

Presenter: Prof Dennis Rodgers, University of Glasgow

Although longitudinal ethnographic research is by no means uncommon, especially within anthropology, its methodological ramifications are rarely explicitly considered. This seminar aims to offer some reflections on the particular perils and pitfalls - but also the unique advantages - of such an endeavour, in particular as they relate to currently ongoing investigations of gang dynamics in barrio Luis Fanor Hernández, a poor neighbourhood in Managua, the capital of Nicaragua. It begins by considering the idea of longitudinal ethnography, and what this actually means in practice, before then exploring how longitudinality can affect the research process, both negatively and positively, with regard to practical considerations as well as research practices. While some of the issues explored are common to all forms of longitudinal research, other concerns are specific to the study of gangs, including more specifically those relating to the changing experience and understanding of risk and danger.

This seminar is free and open to the public. The seminar will be followed by drinks in the Urban Studies staff room.

 

10 Feb 2015: The Bolshevik Response to Anti-Semitism in the Russian Revolution, 1917-1919

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 10 Feb 2015
Time: 17:15
Venue: Lilybank House Seminar Room

Presenter: Brendan McGeever

The Russian Revolution of 1917 was the high point of class struggle in the twentieth-century. It brought about a profound explosion of political mobilisation around issues of class exploitation and other related forms of oppression that remains unprecedented, even today. In the very moment of revolution, however, the Bolsheviks were almost immediately forced to come face-to-face with mass outbreaks of anti-Semitic political violence in the shape of pogroms, which spread across the vast regions of the Western and South-Western borderlands. The pogroms posed fundamental questions of Marxist theory and practice, particularly since they revealed the nature and extent of working class and peasant attachments to anti-Semitic and racialised forms of consciousness. Based on extensive fieldwork in Russian and Ukrainian archives, this paper has two aims: first, it offers a broad analysis of the nature of the articulation between anti-Semitism and the revolutionary process; and second, it offers the first ever in-depth analysis of Bolshevik attempts to arrest these articulations. Contrary to existing understandings, the paper reveals that the ‘anti-racist agent’ in the Soviet response to anti-Semitism was not the Bolshevik party leadership, as is often assumed, but a small grouping of non-Bolshevik Jewish socialists who coalesced around the peripheral apparatuses of the Soviet state. Having recovered this hitherto unrecognised anti-racist praxis from a moment of world historical significance, the paper concludes by reflecting on how this reframing of the Russian Revolution might offer insights for anti-racists and socialists engaged in struggles for social justice today.

Seminar co-hosted with the Centre for the Study of Socialist Theory and Movements

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

11 Feb 2015: Negotiating Socio-spatial Change: Exploring Women’s Everyday Leisure Practices in Two Neighbourhoods of Bursa, Turkey

A School-wide event

Date: Wed 11 Feb 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 711, Adam Smith Building

Speaker: Gokben Demibras (Sociology, Glasgow)

Abstract: This presentation is based upon the pilot study conducted in two different types of neighbourhoods (a relatively deprived neighbourhood and a gated enclave) in Bursa, Turkey. It explores women’s everyday leisure practices in their neighbourhoods through a space-time lens, to foreground how they negotiate the socio-spatial change in their local settings.  I conducted the pilot study as part of my wider PhD research project which is set against and incorporates an analysis of, broader debates relating to the impact and implications of globalisation, particularly for women.  Informed by feminist methodologies, my approach on globalisation goes beyond the binary of macro and micro views but rather focuses on multi-layered, multi-scaled intersection of different gender, class, and ethnic dimensions. In the pilot study, I used a mix of qualitative methods; 6 walk and talk interviews, 2 focus groups with the utilisation of mapping exercises, and participant observation on the walking trails of each neighbourhood. I aim to present preliminary findings and emerging themes and very much looking forward for some feedback.

A Gender and Sexualities Forum event: http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/socialpolitical/research/groups/genderandsexualitiesforum/

 

16 Feb 2015: State Withdrawal and Ethnic Demobilization: A Global Analysis

A Politics event

Date: Mon 16 Feb 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenters: Stephen Bloom, Philip Habel (University of Glasgow) and Buddy Peyton

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

18 Feb 2015: What can replace the transition paradigm in studies of ethnic relations in post-communism?

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 18 Feb 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Alexander Osipov,

European Centre for Minority Issues

Flensburg, Germany

What can replace the transition paradigm in studies of ethnic relations in post-communism?

‘Ethnic relations’ is used here as a broad denomination for social relations involving creation, expression and institutionalization of ethnic divisions. This thematic area is one of the most conservative segments of post-communist studies, remaining subject to the so-called transition paradigm. This paradigm dominated post-communist studies for more than a decade before being widely discarded (Carouthers 2002; Kapustin 2001).

Studies of ethnic relations, however, remain highly dependent on a reincarnation of the same ‘transition paradigm’. This approach goes hand in hand with two discursive patterns which manifest themselves in multi-disciplinary ethnic studies: (1) the tendency to regard ethnicity in terms of agency and not structure and (2) unwitting confusion of the normative and empiric (manifesting itself in such tropes as ‘genuine’/ ‘fake’ ‘autonomy’ or ‘representation’). This often brackets out too many relevant phenomena and fails to place ethnic relations in the context of really existing post-communist social and political order(s).

I argue that neo-patrimonialism is the most promising theoretic framework for approaching the post-communist realities, suggesting that ethnic politics develop in neo-patrimonial environments where public activities are subject to patron-client networks and informal institutions, and resources are allocated in exchange to personal and institutional loyalties (Eisenstadt 1973; Erdmann and Engel 2007). I also consider whether this framework applies only in illiberal societies or if to countries with market economy, rational bureaucracies and rule of law as well (Bach 2011; Theobald 1982).

The CEES Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Enquiries: Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk, +44 (0)141 330 2845

 

18 Feb 2015: Young Adulthood and the Negotiation of Race in Contemporary Britain

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 18 Feb 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Bethan Harries (Manchester/CODE)

Western cities are becoming more ethnically diverse and in many places becoming more youthful. The relationship between youth, young adulthood and race is undergoing significant social change. While some cogent areas of research such as education studies and cultural studies have maintained a focus on race and ethnicity, in youth and young adulthood studies more widely, ‘post-subculture’, race has been significantly absent (Harries et al forthcoming). This represents an oversight in social research.  This paper draws on research with young adults and examines their relationship to and experience of living in a post-industrial cosmopolitan city. The city enables us to recognise the multiple ways in which racism manifests and explores the paradox that becomes apparent when the contemporary city is imagined as a tolerant multicultural space, i.e. beyond race, but is also a space through which race is reproduced. The paper considers how these conflicting processes are dealt with by young adults and examines the effects of the disjuncture between rhetoric and reality; between people’s lived experience (of discrimination, racism and unequal treatment) and the growing discourse that says race no longer matters. Crucially, it considers whether strategies to silence race make it difficult to name racism, rather than working, as is sometimes the implied intention, as an anti-racist device.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

19 Feb 2015: 'Mustering mosquitos’: a nomadic history of Ned Kelly for our times

An Urban Studies event

Date: Thu 19 Feb 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 718, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Jean Hillier, RMIT University, Australia

‘I wish to acquaint you with some of the occurrences of the present past and future’. So begins Ned Kelly’s 1879 Jerilderie letter to the people of south-east Australia. Kelly is probably Australia’s most famous historical person; a hero, a villain or both-and? In the  mountainous backcountry of south-east Australia, outside of and in opposition to the law, Ned Kelly invents nomadism as a response to the challenges of the State. The war machine of Ned Kelly engages transgressive practices of becoming-nomad, revaluing values and forcing us to do likewise. Nomads occupy the Deleuzian smooth space of the social unconscious. Was the Jerilderie letter a call to revolution? From Ned Kelly to Subcommandante Marcos and the EZLN in Mexico, Phoolan Devi, so-called ‘bandit queen’ in India, the international Occupy movement and Julian Assange’s Wikileaks, war machines are resisting the State and doing things otherwise. Nomadology as the opposite of history can challenge our ‘present past and future’ and our values of ‘hero’ and ‘villain’, to creatively engage transgressive practices in the intermezzo.

Jean Hillier is Emeritus Professor of Sustainability and Urban Plannning at RMIT

University, Melbourne, Australia. Her research interests include poststructural planning

theory and methodology for strategic practice in conditions of uncertainty, planning with

non-human animals, and problematisation of cultural heritage practices and public art

in spatial planning. Recent books include Deleuze and Guattari for Planners (InPlanning

e-book, 2013); Complexity and the Planning of the Built Environment (2012) edited with

Gert de Roo and Joris Van Wezemael, the Ashgate Research Companion to Planning

Theory: Conceptual Challenges for Spatial Planning (2010) edited with Patsy Healey,

Critical Essays in Planning Theory (2008) three volumes, edited with Patsy Healey.

For more information on the Urban Studies Seminar Series, please contact Annette.Hastings@glasgow.ac.uk

 

25 Feb 2015: Farewell to Male Breadwinning: Resurrecting the Socialist Past to Better Understand the Post-Socialist Present

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 25 Feb 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES seminar room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Farewell to Male Breadwinning: Resurrecting the Socialist Past to Better Understand the Post-Socialist Present

ABSTRACT

State socialism undeniably shaped institutional legacies of post-socialist EU member states; not only had it produced an extraordinary leap in terms of female employment, it also heralded significant change in the role of the state in the family. Post-socialist countries are often homogenised and treated as a single country cluster in the welfare-state regime and comparative policy literature. This paper attempts a more nuanced assessment via analysis of their socialist past. It demonstrates that countries adopted different models of state socialism, endorsing and legitimizing different family policies and gender roles. It shows that they departed state socialism with mixed legacies and collective experiences about social organisation of childcare and female employment, and invites perspectives for further academic debate about the ‘common socialist legacy’, distinct ‘post-socialist’ family policy regime, and a uniform shift to ‘neo-familialism’.

Key words: female employment, childcare, family policy, state socialism, varieties of familialism

Short bio: Dr. Javornik is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Leeds, working in the Work, Care and Global Transitions group within the Building Sustainable Societies programme. She is a member of CIRCLE (Centre for International Research on Care, Labour and Equalities) at Leeds, the Work Futures Research Centre in Southampton, and a Visiting Scholar at the UIceland, ULjubljana (SI), and UUmeå (SE).

This seminar series is supported by the University of Glasgow MacFie Bequest: http://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography/?id=WH0079&type=P

For more information on the CEES Seminar series, please contact Ammon.Cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk.

 

26 Feb 2015: Being a working woman in a Catholic country: work and identity in post-war Italy, 1945-1970

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 26 Feb 2015
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Pamela Schievenin (University of Glasgow)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

4 Mar 2015: Neither Pink Nor Blue: Marine Le Pen, Parity, and French Right Wing Populism

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 4 Mar 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Dorit Geva (Central European University)

This paper draws from ethnographic research and interviews with members of the French National Front.  I interrogate how party members view Marine Le Pen, the party’s leader, as embodying a corrective to the European Union’s policies of austerity, and the shadowy, abstract workings of Brussels (and French) neoliberal technocratic governance.  Although members of the National Front consistently deny that Marine’s gender matters to them, I argue that the gendered political symbolism around her matters a great deal.  FN adherents frequently celebrate Marine’s beauty.  Furthermore, as one interviewee memorably commented, they see her as “wearing the party’s history on her skin.”  I argue that as the daughter of Jean-Marie Le Pen, the party’s longstanding President, her blood lineage and her feminine corporality tie her symbolically to the party, and to French sovereignty, blood, and terroir.  Marine’s lineage and corporality are therefore in themselves viewed as a riposte to the opaque, technocratic “men in suits" of the European Union and France’s political elites. She is also seen as a “modern woman,” in contrast to the supposed backwardness of Muslim immigrants.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

9 Mar 2015: New Directions in Global Development: The Multilateral Development Banks and the Global Financial Crisis

A Politics event

Date: Mon 9 Mar 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Paul Cammack (City University of Hong Kong)

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

9 Mar 2015: Environmental attitudes in Britain

A School-wide event

Date: Mon 9 Mar 2015
Time: 15:30
Venue: Urban Studies Boardroom, Room 139, 29 Bute Gardens

Speaker: Professor Stephen Fisher, Associate Professor in Political Sociology, Trinity College, University of Oxford.

This School-wide seminar presentation will focus on change in environmental attitudes, especially, towards climate change, over the past couple of decades at the macro level, but will also incorporate some discussion of the structure of environmental attitudes at the individual level and their relationships with electoral politics.

 

10 Mar 2015: Lecture: Latvia's Presidency of the European Union

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Tue 10 Mar 2015
Time:
Venue: Sir Alwyn Williams Building (5th floor)

Speaker: His Excellency Mr Andris Teikmanis, Latvia's Ambassador to the UK

All welcome.

Refreshments will be provided after the lecture. For catering purposes, please inform Sue.Keast@glasgow.ac.uk by Friday 6th March if you plan to attend.

 

10 Mar 2015: Social distance, social identity and social cohesion: Investigating the ‘diversity decline’ thesis in two cities

An Urban Studies event

Date: Tue 10 Mar 2015
Time: 15:00
Venue: Yudowitz Seminar Rm, Wolfson Medical School Building

Presenter:Dr. Rebecca Wickes, University of Queensland

Increased ethnic diversity is associated with decreases in social cohesion and increases in social withdrawal. We argue that two mechanisms may explain these relationships: social distance and social identity orientations. This paper investigates these associations

by using census data and the Australian Community Capacity Study survey data from 10,000 residents living in 298 neighborhoods in Melbourne and Brisbane, Australia. We consider the extent to which increases in immigration, ancestry, language and religion influence social distance and if this, in turn, enhances residents’ social identities. We then assess the independent effects of social distance and social identity orientations on residents’ reports of social cohesion and interactions with fellow neighbors.

Dr. Rebecca Wickes is an ARC Research Fellow and a Senior Lecturer in criminology at the School of Social Science, The University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia. Dr Wickes is also an Associate of the Institute for Social Science Research, a Research Fellow with the ARC Center of Excellence in Life Course Research and an Associate Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence in Policing and Security (CEPS). Using quantitative and qualitative methods, Dr. Wickes focusses on demographic changes in urban communities and their influence on social relationships, community regulation, crime and disorder over time. She is the director of the Australian Community Capacity Study, a multi-million, multisite, longitudinal study of place. She has published substantive works in Criminology, Journal for Research in Crime and Delinquency, Plos One, the Sociological Review and the Journal for Urban Affairs.

For more information on the Urban Studies Seminar Series, please contact Annette.Hastings@glasgow.ac.uk

 

18 Mar 2015: Social rights, welfare reform and expectations of the state in contemporary Russia

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 18 Mar 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Abstract:

While violations of civil and political rights in Russia such as freedom of speech have long received a great deal of attention from the international community and domestic human rights groups, social rights such as the right to health, housing and social security have traditionally been discussed far less, despite the fact that these rights tend to rank higher in Russians’ own estimations of which rights matter to them most. This paper seeks to address this imbalance by exploring the long yet contested history of social rights protection and promotion in Russia and to relate this history to contemporary attitudes towards the major welfare reforms Russia has undergone in the post-Soviet period and expectations of what the State can and should provide to its citizens in terms of welfare assistance. It draws on a number of interviews conducted in various regions of Russia in 2011 and 2014 to set out the terms for a new research project which will explore these issues in more detail and put them in comparative perspective alongside similar developments in Ukraine.

This seminar series is supported by the University of Glasgow MacFie Bequest: http://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography/?id=WH0079&type=P

For more information on the CEES seminar series please contact Dr Ammon Cheskin: ammon.cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk

 

18 Mar 2015: Understanding Changes in Family Caregiving for Disabled Older Americans, 1982-2012

A Sociology event

Date: Wed 18 Mar 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Presenter: Dr. Alex Janus (Edinburgh)

How has family caregiving for disabled older Americans changed over the past three decades and what factors explain these changes? To answer these questions, I use data from the 1982-2005 waves of the National Long-Term Care Survey and the 2000-2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study to obtain nationally representative estimates for disabled older people 65 and over. I find that hours of family caregiving declined by almost half during the 1990's but has remained unchanged more recently. Using Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition, I pay particular attention to the role of family structure and other factors related to caregiver availability in explaining these trends. I discuss my findings with reference to other changes families are undergoing and long-term care policy.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

23 Mar 2015: What Being in the Euro and the Debate over Independence Tells Us About the Politics of Money: A Disconsolate Analysis

A Politics event

Date: Mon 23 Mar 2015
Time: 17:00
Venue: Room 916, Adam Smith Building

Mackenzie Lecture

Presenter: Mark Blyth (Brown University, Providence RI)

The Politics Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Contact: Stephen.White@glasgow.ac.uk

 

24 Mar 2015: David Frisby Memorial Lecture: Making Sense of the Crisis: Is the financial crisis cascading into a democratic crisis in Europe?

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 24 Mar 2015
Time: 17:00
Venue: Sir Charles Wilson Lecture Theatre

This year's David Frisby Memorial Lecture will be delivered by Prof. Sylvia Walby (UNESCO Chair in Gender Research, University of Lancaster).

The European nightmare is that economic crisis leads to the re-emergence of ethno-nationalism and fascism, with violence engulfing democratic institutions. Potentially, the crisis, starting in finance in the US and UK in 2007, cascading into the real economy of output and employment, cascading into fiscal crisis and 'austerity', and cascading into political crisis, will become a crisis of democracy in the European Union.  Sociology did not see the crisis coming and has struggled to produce adequate analyses of its various phases and of its political dynamics.  What are its gender dynamics and why do these appear invisible to Sociology? The developments challenge traditional systems theory as well as the recent 'cultural turn'.

Using the insights of complexity theory, I re-work core Sociological concepts and theories: re-thinking rather than rejecting the concept of system; re-thinking the concept of society in a globalizing world; developing the concepts of 'tipping point' and path dependency; rethinking the intersection of gender, class and ethnic inequalities and of political projects.  These enable a more adequate account not only of the changes in capital, but also of the gendered nature of the neoliberal project that is challenging social democracy. 

Free to attend and open to all.

For further information on this lecture series see http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/socialpolitical/research/sociology/frisbymemoriallectures/

 

25 Mar 2015: Locals into Poles: National Identities in the Making in Upper Silesia, 1870s-1930s

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 25 Mar 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

4pm, Wednesday 25 March, CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Dr Andrzej Michalczyk (Ruhr-University Bochum)

We already know a good deal about how national identity emerged among political elites and people from the upper and middle classes. But we don't yet know much about how a sense of belonging to a national community was spread among 'common people' and adopted by them. This paper will take a micro-historical, actor-centred approach to analyse the influence of nationalism and demonstrate how 'modernization' established itself at the local level and in the everyday life of local people at the turn of the century during a period of a dramatic social transition in East-Central Europe.

This seminar has been jointly organised by Mary Heimann (Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, University of Strathclyde). For questions please contact Marymary.heimann@strath.ac.uk or Ammon cheskin (ammon.cheskin@glasgow.ac.uk)

This seminar series is supported by the University of Glasgow MacFie Bequest: http://www.universitystory.gla.ac.uk/biography/?id=WH0079&type=P

 

26 Mar 2015: From Cultural Patricians to New Media Executives: the BBC from Alasdair Milne to Greg Dyke

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 26 Mar 2015
Time: 11:00
Venue: Seminar Room, Lilybank House

Chris Carter (University of Edinburgh)

All welcome. Tea, coffee and biscuits will be available.

The Economic & Social History Seminar Programme is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Seminar Programme contact: Michael.French@glasgow.ac.uk

 

13-16 Apr 2015: Scottish Economic Society Annual Conference: Financial Literacy Session

An Urban Studies event

Date: Mon 13-16 Apr 2015
Time: 12:00
Venue: Mercure Perth Hotel, Perth, Scotland, UK

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

UBDC researcher, Dr. Catherine Lido, will be representing Prof. Mike Osborne and presenting the work of the Integrated Multimedia City Data (iMCD) project and its links with financial literacy.

For more information and the final schedule of sessions, please visit the SES website: http://www.scotecon.org/conference.html

 

16 Apr 2015: Edinburgh International Science Festival: Big Solutions in Big Data

An Urban Studies event

Date: Thu 16 Apr 2015
Time: 17:30
Venue: Main Hall, Summer Hall, Edinburgh, UK

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

UBDC Director, Prof. Piyushimita (Vonu) Thakuriah, speaks about "Big Solutions in Big Data" at the Edinburgh International Science Festival. For full event details, please visit the event website: http://www.sciencefestival.co.uk/event-details/big-solutions-in-big-data

 

22-23 Apr 2015: Big Data Society Conference: Using data to identify and tackle societal problems

An Urban Studies event

Date: Wed 22-23 Apr 2015
Time: 12:00
Venue: Central Edinburgh (Venue TBC)

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

Prof. Nick Bailey, Associate Director of the Urban Big Data Centre will be speaking on "Using data to identify and tackle society problems."

Big Data presents exciting opportunities for policy makers and social researchers interested in understanding and addressing societal problems. But it is policy and social research which need to drive the technology, not the other way round.

Big Data currently have Big Gaps, and much of the current opportunities derive from combining these with more traditional data sources, notably from surveys and administrative systems.

For more a more information and a full conference agenda, visit the Big Data Society Conference website: http://bigdata.holyrood.com/

 

5 May 2015: Robert J. Stimson Seminar: Big Data, Smart Cities and Urban Research Infrastructure

An Urban Studies event

Date: Tue 5 May 2015
Time: 17:15
Venue: Yudowitz Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical School Building, University of Glasgow

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

Robert J. Stimson, Senior Academic Advisor (and former Director), Australian Urban Research Infrastructure Network (AURIN), The University of Melbourne .

For full details and agenda visit the event page: http://ubdc.ac.uk/our-services/events-workshops-training-more/upcoming-events/robert-j-stimson-seminar/

 

13 May 2015: Russophobia, russo-hypopsia, and the making and unmaking of the Eastern Partnership

A Central & East European Studies event

Date: Wed 13 May 2015
Time:
Venue: CEES Seminar Roon, 8 Lilybank Gardens, G12 8AZ

5pm, CEES Seminar Room, 8 Lilybank Gardens

Professor Raymond Taras, Tulane University

The Eastern Neighborhood Initiative launched in 2008 by the improbable alliance of Poland and Sweden sought to promote closer EU relations with former Soviet republics. But President Medvedev warned that Russia did “not want the Eastern Partnership to turn into partnership against Russia”. In March 2015 EU foreign policy head Federica Mogherini deplored how this region was now “in flames” and called for “more flexible ways of working with the neighbours of the neighbours”, that is, Russia. Is there a basis for Russia framing the Polish-Swedish initiative “russophobic”, thereby explaining the need for an EU review in Riga in May 2015? What does russophobia mean anyway after the outbreak of armed conflict in Ukraine? Can there be a political payoff from reconceptualising relations with Russia to stress not fear or hate of it but instead mistrust and suspicion?

This seminar is supported by the Centre for Russian Central and East European Studies (CRCEES). CRCEES is a centre of excellence funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.

 

14-16 May 2015: ‘Public and Private’: Interdisciplinary Workshop

An Economic & Social History event

Date: Thu 14-16 May 2015
Time: 12:00
Venue: University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom

Economic and Social History at Glasgow is launching a major new research theme of ‘public and private’ to act as an umbrella for its diverse research activities. These reach across business, financial, gender, labour, medical, and oral history as well as most types of modern economic and social history. A warm welcome will be extended to all colleagues, students and friends who are interested in attending all or parts of this launch event. Speakers include invited visitors, who will address the ‘public and private’ theme from a number of perspectives, and members of staff and graduate students in ESH who will examine the ways in which this theme can be deployed in research across a wide range of important topics.

Refreshments will be available at various points in the workshop, along with a buffet lunch at the conclusion of proceedings on Friday 15 May, courtesy of the Economic History Society, the main sponsor of the event, and the University of Glasgow’s MacFie Bequest. Attendance is free of charge, but for catering purposes those intending to participate should notify Jim Phillips, Head of Economic & Social History, by Friday 8 May if possible: James.Phillips@glasgow.ac.uk

WORKSHOP PROGRAMME

Thursday 14 May, Room 916, Adam Smith Building

1.45 Welcome – Anne Anderson, Vice-Principal and Head of College, Social Sciences (University of Glasgow) and Jim Tomlinson (University of Glasgow)

2.00 Opening Plenary, Penny Tinkler (University of Manchester)

2.50 'Public discourses, private lives: family relationships in war-time Scotland, 1914-1919', Rosemary Elliot and Annmarie Hughes (University of Glasgow)

3.30 ‘"He calls him his ‘husband’!" Exploring Public and Private Representations and Experiences of Same-Sex Relationships, Civil Partnerships & Marriages in Scotland’, Jeff Meek (University of Glasgow)

4.10 Tea, Lilybank House

4.40 ‘Rethinking the "private" in public health: disease surveillance and domestic space’, Graham Mooney (Johns Hopkins)

5.30 ‘The roles of history in debates about privacy, public interests and datafication’, Angus Ferguson (University of Glasgow)

6.15 Drinks reception, Lilybank House

Friday 15 May, Seminar Room 3, Woolfson Medical School

9.30 ‘The public and the private in twentieth-century Britain: some historiographic problems and opportunities’, David Edgerton, KCL

10.40 Coffee, Atrium, Woolfson Medical School

11.00 Jeff Fear (University of Glasgow) ‘Keeping it all in the family: The German Mittelstand’

11.45 The public and the private: oral history, led by Andrea Thomson with Ewan Gibbs and Martha Kirby (all University of Glasgow)

1.00 Lunch, Lilybank House

 

2 Jun 2015: Reputations, Canons and Public Intellectuals

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 2 Jun 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Lecture Theatre B, Boyd Orr Building

Presenter: Neil McLaughlin (McMaster University, Hamilton Ontario, Canada)

"There is a rich literature on the social and historical mechanisms that create dominant academic canons as well some work on the less studied processes that create forgotten intellectuals and schools of thought, but too little of this deals systematically with how public engagement shapes reputations. Drawing on case material on Erich Fromm, Noam Chomsky, and C Wright Mills alongside a systematic data set from the 1950s, I will address the issue of predecessor selection and canon formation alongside the newer debate on the public intellectual."

Neil McLaughlin teaches sociological theory at McMaster University, in Hamilton Ontario, Canada. He writes about the sociology of public intellectuals, public sociology, the sociology of knowledge and ideas, and critical theory. He had published in such journals as Cultural Sociology, Sociological Theory, The Canadian Sociological Review, The Sociological Quarterly, The Sociological Forum and The Canadian Journal of Sociology.  Born in Glasgow, raised in Montreal and educated in New York City, he is pleased to be engaging in a transnational intellectual dialogue.

All are welcome.

The Sociology Seminar Series is supported by the MacFie Bequest, named after Professor Alec MacFie, Adam Smith Professor of Political Economy at the University from 1945 to 1958.

Any enquiries about this event can be addressed to: Francesca.Scrinzi@glasgow.ac.uk

 

8 Jun 2015: Mark S. Fox Seminar: The PolisGnosis Project Enabling the Computational Analysis of City Performance

An Urban Studies event

Date: Mon 8 Jun 2015
Time: 17:15
Venue: Yudowitz Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical School Building, University of Glasgow

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

Speaker: Mark S. Fox, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Computer Science,

Director, Centre for Social Services Engineering,

Senior Fellow, Global Cities Institute, University of Toronto

Cities use a variety of metrics to evaluate and compare their performance.  With the introduction of ISO 37120, which contains over 100 indicators for measuring a city’s quality of life and sustainability, it is now possible to consistently measure and compare cities, assuming they adhere to the standard.  The goal of this research is to develop theories, embodied in software, to perform longitudinal analysis (i.e., how and why a city’s indicators change over time) and transversal analysis (i.e., how and why cities differ from each other), in order to discover the root causes of differences.

For full details visit the event page: http://ubdc.ac.uk/our-services/events-workshops-training-more/upcoming-events/mark-s-fox-seminar/

 

16 Jun 2015: The Present Situation for LGBTI People in Uganda

A Sociology event

Date: Tue 16 Jun 2015
Time: 17:00
Venue: Yudowitz seminar room 1, Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow

Speaker: Dr. Frank Mugisha (Executive Director, Sexual Minorities Uganda)

Presentation followed by conversation with Dr. Matthew Waites, Q&A and discussion.

The event will conclude with a wine reception.  If you would like to attend, please register on the Eventbrite site: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-present-situation-for-lgbti-people-in-uganda-tickets-16817686152

Tickets for the original date (18th June) remain valid. If you have booked but can no longer attend please cancel to enable someone else to attend, contact David.Wright@glasgow.ac.uk (also for any other ticket queries).

Travel information and campus maps can be found here: http://www.gla.ac.uk/about/maps

Please help publicise the event; there is a Facebook site; Twitter updates @MatthewWaites @GlasgowHumRts , event hashtag #LGBTIUgandaGlasgow .

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All are welcome at this event

On 17 June Dr Frank Mugisha, Executive Director of Sexual Minorities Uganda and Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award Laureate (2011), will be awarded the Honorary Degree of Doctor of the University (DUniv) at the University of Glasgow, on Commemoration Day.   This award follows Dr. Mugisha’s address as Keynote Speaker at the LGBTI Human Rights in the Commonwealth conference held at the University on Nelson Mandela Day 18 July 2014, as a partnership between Glasgow Human Rights Network, Equality Network, Kaleidoscope Trust and Pride Glasgow (videos of the event including Dr. Mugisha’s address are available from the conference website).

On 16 June the Glasgow Human Rights Network, in partnership with the Gender and Sexualities Forum, is hosting a special event for Dr. Mugisha to speak on ‘The Present Situation for LGBTI People in Uganda’.  The event will be chaired by Dr. Matthew Waites, Senior Lecturer in Sociology and co-editor (with Corinne Lennox) of Human Rights, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the Commonwealth: Struggles for Decriminalisation and Change (School of Advanced Study, University of London, 2013; free online at: http://commonwealth.sas.ac.uk/publications/house-publications/lgbt-rights-commonwealth).

The event will take place in three parts.  First, Dr. Mugisha will make a presentation on the present situation in Uganda and international responses.  Second, Dr. Mugisha will engage in conversation with Dr. Waites on several questions, particularly on how the LGBTI movement struggles in Uganda relate to UK and transnational politics and LGBTI activism.  Thirdly there will be substantial time for questions and open discussion involving everyone attending; it is intended that this final section will be informal and an open forum, including for activists/NGOs to discuss current developments and collaborative strategies and support.

Scott Cuthbertson, Development Coordinator of Equality Network will comment on Equality Network's international work.

Please share information about this event widely to all relevant networks for human rights, LGBTI and social justice issues.

The venue is accessible.

Advance registration is essential via the link above, please print and bring your ticket.

Anyone attending with particular access or other requirements, questions or comments, please contact Matthew Waites.

Background and reading:

'Unnatural offences' concerning 'carnal intercourse against the order of nature' have been prohibited by legal statutes in Uganda since their creation by the British Empire in 1902.   In 2009 the 'Anti-Homosexuality Bill' was introduced into the Uganda parliament, initially proposing the death penalty for 'aggravated homosexuality' and known as the 'Kill the Gays' bill. A later revised version removed the death penalty. On 24 February 2014, after the bill's passage through parliament, President Museveni signed the Anti-Homosexuality Act into law.  However on 1 August 2014 the Constitutional Court in Uganda ruled the Act invalid due to parliament not being quorate when passed. A further bill called The Prohibition of Promotion of Unnatural Sexual Practices Bill was drafted in 2014.        

A history of the Uganda LGBTI movement's struggle and legal issues is provided by Adrian Jjuuko 'The incremental approach: Uganda's struggle for the decriminalisation of homosexuality', Chapter 14 in Corinne Lennox and Matthew Waites eds. (2013) Human Rights, Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in the Commonwealth: Struggles for Decriminalisation and Change (London: School of Advanced Study).  Free online.

 

22 Jun 2015: Neighbourhood Effects on Crime: New Evidence from a Copenhagen Natural Experiment

An Urban Studies event

Date: Mon 22 Jun 2015
Time: 16:00
Venue: Room 718, Adam Smith Building, University of Glasgow

Speaker: Prof. George Galster, Wayne State University

We investigate the degree to which criminal offenses committed by youth and young adults are influenced by their neighborhood surroundings, especially the demographic, socioeconomic and criminal dimensions of their social housing development. We identify causal relationships by using a natural experiment wherein the Copenhagen, DK municipality assigns households with urgent housing needs to every third social housing unit that becomes vacant, a process we show produces quasi-random assignment. Regression models indicate that the proportion of neighborhood residents aged 15-29 with prior criminal charges decreases the number of property crimes (primarily for females) and the proportion aged 30-59 with only basic education increases the number of property crimes (primarily for males) a newly assigned resident will be charged with over the following three years.

George Galster earned his Ph.D. in Economics from M.I.T. and now serves as Clarence Hilberry Professor of Urban Affairs at Wayne State University. He has published 135 peer-reviewed articles, 8 books and 32 book chapters on topics ranging from metropolitan housing markets, racial discrimination and segregation, community change, reinvestment, lending and insurance patterns, neighborhood effects, and urban poverty. He has provided housing policy consultations to the governments of Australia, Canada, China, Scotland, and the U.S. The Urban Affairs Association placed him on their Service Honor Roll in 2014.

 

23 Jun 2015: Harvey J. Miller Workshop: The Moving Across Places Study (MAPS): Measuring the Influence of Light Rail Transit and Complete Streets on Physical Activity

An Urban Studies event

Date: Tue 23 Jun 2015
Time: 17:15
Venue: Yudowitz Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical School Building, University of Glasgow

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

Speaker: Prof. Harvey J. Miller, Bob and Mary Reusche Chair in Geographic Information Science and Professor in the Department of Geography at The Ohio State University

For full details and agenda visit the event page: http://ubdc.ac.uk/our-services/events-workshops-training-more/upcoming-events/harvey-j-miller-workshop/

 

25 Jun 2015: Masterclass with Prof. Harvey J. Miller

An Urban Studies event

Date: Thu 25 Jun 2015
Time: 12:00
Venue: Conference Room, Urban Big Data Centre, 7 Lilybank Gardens, University of Glasgow, G12 8RZ

An Urban Big Data Centre event.

The UBDC is delighted to announce a Masterclass with Prof. Harvey J. Miller, Chair in Geographic Information Science and Professor at The Ohio State University. This masterclass is aimed primarily at postgraduate and early career researchers - please see full agenda below. Refreshments and light lunch will be provided.

Please note that registration is required.

For full details, agenda and to register, visit the event page: http://ubdc.ac.uk/our-services/events-workshops-training-more/upcoming-events/harvey-j-miller-masterclass/

 

20-23 Jul 2015: Themes from Smith and Rousseau 2015

A Politics event

Date: Mon 20-23 Jul 2015
Time: 12:00
Venue: University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, United Kingdom

A joint meeting of the International Adam Smith Society and the Rousseau Association at the University of Glasgow July 20th -22nd 2015. The meeting aims to bring together scholars to discuss the shared interests and the relationship between two prominent members of the Enlightenment. Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and Adam Smith (1723-1790) are two of the foremost thinkers of the European Enlightenment, thinkers who made seminal contributions to moral and political philosophy and who shaped some of the key concepts of modern political economy. The intellectual influence of Rousseau on Smith has become a matter of increasing scholarly interest. Smith’s first published work was a letter to the Edinburgh Review (1756) where he discusses contemporary philosophy, the Encyclopédie and Rousseau’s Discours sur l‘origine et les fondemens de l’inégalité parmi les hommes (1755). The discussion comes at a key point in Smith’s intellectual development as he was engaged in writing the Theory of Moral Sentiments (1759) which emerged to great acclaim and established his international reputation.

We’ll explore the ideas and shared concerns of Adam Smith and Jean-Jacques Rousseau in a series of workshop panels divided into three broad themes: Morality, Politics and Smith and Rousseau. The Meeting is supported by a grant from the British Academy/Leverhulme Small Research Grants Scheme.

Adam Smith was a student, professor and rector of the University of Glasgow.

Contact: Dr Craig Smith, Adam Smith Lecturer in the Scottish Enlightenment, School of Social and Political Sciences (Craig.Smith@glasgow.ac.uk)

Website: www.glasgow.ac.uk/smithrousseau2015