Dr Sihong Lin

  • Lecturer in Early Medieval History (History)

email: Sihong.Lin@glasgow.ac.uk

Room 405, 10 University Gardens, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QH

Import to contacts

ORCID iDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-1125-2775

Research interests

I am a historian of cross-cultural exchanges in late antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Although this period is frequently seen as when the unity of Christendom fractured, my research argues that cross-cultural exchanges remained vibrant and that we should still study the Greek East and the Latin West together. As a result, I have been interested in how religious and intellectual networks allowed for the spread of ideas from the sixth- and seventh-century Middle East to western Europe, even to as far as Britain, and how these networks were influenced by the papacy in Rome. I remain a keen Byzantinist, however, and I have also published on the political and religious history of the eastern Roman/Byzantine Empire, with a particular focus on the sixth-century emperors Justinian and Justin II.

My work has also addressed the influence of eastern ideas on post-Roman authors, particularly Gregory of Tours in Gaul and the Venerable Bede in Northumbria, and together they argue for a more interconnected Christendom at the end of late antiquity. I am therefore keen to also emphasise the importance of taking a transnational, even global, perspective on early medieval history.

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2023 | 2022 | 2021 | 2020
Number of items: 6.

2023

Lin, S. (2023) The fall of Merovingian Italy, 561‒565. Early Medieval Europe, 31(4), pp. 543-562. (doi: 10.1111/emed.12670)

2022

Lin, S. (2022) Rereading absence: silent narratives in the ‘Life of Eligius of Noyon. In: Fafinski, M. and Riemenschneider, J. (eds.) The Past Through Narratology: New Approaches to Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Series: Das Mittelalter. Perspektiven mediävistischer Forschung. Beihefte (vol.18). Heidelberg University Publishing: Heidelberg, pp. 27-39. ISBN 9783968221076 (doi: 10.17885/heiup.921.c13612)

2021

Lin, S. (2021) Justinian’s Frankish War, 552‒ca. 560. Studies in Late Antiquity, 5(3), pp. 403-431. (doi: 10.1525/sla.2021.5.3.403)

Lin, S. (2021) Bede, the Papacy, and the Emperors of Constantinople. English Historical Review, 136(580), pp. 465-497. (doi: 10.1093/ehr/ceab113)

Lin, S. (2021) Justin under Justinian: the rise of Emperor Justin II revisited. Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75, pp. 121-142.

2020

Lin, S. (2020) The Merovingian Kingdoms and the Monothelete controversy. Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 71(2), pp. 235-252. (doi: 10.1017/S002204691900229X)

This list was generated on Thu May 30 20:08:31 2024 BST.
Number of items: 6.

Articles

Lin, S. (2023) The fall of Merovingian Italy, 561‒565. Early Medieval Europe, 31(4), pp. 543-562. (doi: 10.1111/emed.12670)

Lin, S. (2021) Justinian’s Frankish War, 552‒ca. 560. Studies in Late Antiquity, 5(3), pp. 403-431. (doi: 10.1525/sla.2021.5.3.403)

Lin, S. (2021) Bede, the Papacy, and the Emperors of Constantinople. English Historical Review, 136(580), pp. 465-497. (doi: 10.1093/ehr/ceab113)

Lin, S. (2021) Justin under Justinian: the rise of Emperor Justin II revisited. Dumbarton Oaks Papers, 75, pp. 121-142.

Lin, S. (2020) The Merovingian Kingdoms and the Monothelete controversy. Journal of Ecclesiastical History, 71(2), pp. 235-252. (doi: 10.1017/S002204691900229X)

Book Sections

Lin, S. (2022) Rereading absence: silent narratives in the ‘Life of Eligius of Noyon. In: Fafinski, M. and Riemenschneider, J. (eds.) The Past Through Narratology: New Approaches to Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Series: Das Mittelalter. Perspektiven mediävistischer Forschung. Beihefte (vol.18). Heidelberg University Publishing: Heidelberg, pp. 27-39. ISBN 9783968221076 (doi: 10.17885/heiup.921.c13612)

This list was generated on Thu May 30 20:08:31 2024 BST.

Supervision

I would be keen to hear from potential PhD candidates who are interested in the eastern Roman Empire, the post-Roman kingdoms (particularly in Merovingian Gaul and Britain), as well as cross-cultural connections in the world of late antiquity. My work so far has focused on the sixth and seventh centuries, but I will in the future broaden the chronological and geographical scope of my work on networks/church history, so I am likewise interested in supporting broader research projects on late antiquity and the early Middle Ages.