Dr Clara Cohen

  • Lecturer in Psycholinguistics (English Language & Linguistics)

telephone: 01413308122
email: Clara.Cohen@glasgow.ac.uk

Room 205 Level 2, 12 University Gardens, G12 8QH

ORCID iDhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-7308-671X

Research interests

Although I started studying quite traditional generative linguistics (I still have a quiet fondness for clever phonological rule-ordering examples and elegant phrase-structure trees), my interests now tilt more and more towards experimental research into language processing, and computational research with corpus data. Shiny new toys delight me, and I am happiest when I am experimenting with a new programming language to analyze different types of corpus data, a new eye-tracking lab, a new way of doing growth-curve analysis,  Bayesian approaches to statistics, or a fancy ERP cap, with gel and electrodes and blinking lights.

 In order to fight the danger of distracting myself from my work with all these shiny toys, I use the results of my experiments as converging evidence from many different data sources, united in pursuit of larger questions:

  • Experimental: How do details of pronunciation variation illuminate patterns in lexical storage and retrieval? 
  • Computational: How can computational models shed light on the processes underlying bilingual processing and second language acquisition?

 

Publications

List by: Type | Date

Jump to: 2020 | 2018 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2011
Number of items: 9.

2020

Cohen, C. , Higham, C. F. and Nabi, S. W. (2020) Deep learnability: using neural networks to quantify language similarity and learnability. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence, 3, 43. (doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.00043)

2018

Cohen, C. and Kang, S. (2018) Flexible perceptual sensitivity to acoustic and distributional cues. Mental Lexicon, 13(1), pp. 38-73. (doi: 10.1075/ml.16029.coh)

2016

Van Hell, J. G., Cohen, C. and Grey, S. (2016) Testing tolerance for lexically-specific factors in Gradient Symbolic Computation. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 19(5), pp. 897-899. (doi: 10.1017/S1366728916000122)

Cohen, C. and Carlson, M. (2016) Phonetic reduction can lead to lengthening, and enhancement can lead to shortening. Interspeech 2016, San Francisco, CA, USA, 08-12 Sep 2016. pp. 1094-1098. (doi:10.21437/Interspeech.2016-1146)

Kang, S. and Cohen, C. (2016) Relationships between functional load and auditory confusability under different speech environments. Interspeech 2016, San Francisco, CA, USA, 08-12 Sep 2016. pp. 1094-1098. (doi:10.21437/Interspeech.2016-906)

2015

Cohen, C. (2015) Context and paradigms: two patterns of probabilistic pronunciation variation in Russian agreement suffixes. Mental Lexicon, 10(3), pp. 313-338. (doi: 10.1075/ml.10.3.01coh)

2014

Cohen, C. (2014) Probabilistic reduction and probabilistic enhancement: contextual and paradigmatic effects on morpheme pronunciation. Morphology, 24(4), pp. 291-323. (doi: 10.1007/s11525-014-9243-y)

2013

Cohen, C. (2013) Hierarchies, subjects, and the lack thereof in Imbabura Quichua subordinate clauses. Working Paper. Survey Reports, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, Berkeley, CA.

2011

Cohen, C. (2011) Proto-Bantu – Nzadi sound correspondences. In: Crane, T. M., Hyman, L. M. and Tukumu, S. N. (eds.) A Grammar of Nzadi [B865]: a Bantu Language of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Series: University of California publications in linguistics (147). University of California Press: Berkley and Los Angeles, California, pp. 255-270. ISBN 9780520098862

This list was generated on Sat Dec 5 04:25:54 2020 GMT.
Number of items: 9.

Articles

Cohen, C. , Higham, C. F. and Nabi, S. W. (2020) Deep learnability: using neural networks to quantify language similarity and learnability. Frontiers in Artificial Intelligence, 3, 43. (doi: 10.3389/frai.2020.00043)

Cohen, C. and Kang, S. (2018) Flexible perceptual sensitivity to acoustic and distributional cues. Mental Lexicon, 13(1), pp. 38-73. (doi: 10.1075/ml.16029.coh)

Van Hell, J. G., Cohen, C. and Grey, S. (2016) Testing tolerance for lexically-specific factors in Gradient Symbolic Computation. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 19(5), pp. 897-899. (doi: 10.1017/S1366728916000122)

Cohen, C. (2015) Context and paradigms: two patterns of probabilistic pronunciation variation in Russian agreement suffixes. Mental Lexicon, 10(3), pp. 313-338. (doi: 10.1075/ml.10.3.01coh)

Cohen, C. (2014) Probabilistic reduction and probabilistic enhancement: contextual and paradigmatic effects on morpheme pronunciation. Morphology, 24(4), pp. 291-323. (doi: 10.1007/s11525-014-9243-y)

Book Sections

Cohen, C. (2011) Proto-Bantu – Nzadi sound correspondences. In: Crane, T. M., Hyman, L. M. and Tukumu, S. N. (eds.) A Grammar of Nzadi [B865]: a Bantu Language of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Series: University of California publications in linguistics (147). University of California Press: Berkley and Los Angeles, California, pp. 255-270. ISBN 9780520098862

Research Reports or Papers

Cohen, C. (2013) Hierarchies, subjects, and the lack thereof in Imbabura Quichua subordinate clauses. Working Paper. Survey Reports, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, Berkeley, CA.

Conference or Workshop Item

Cohen, C. and Carlson, M. (2016) Phonetic reduction can lead to lengthening, and enhancement can lead to shortening. Interspeech 2016, San Francisco, CA, USA, 08-12 Sep 2016. pp. 1094-1098. (doi:10.21437/Interspeech.2016-1146)

Kang, S. and Cohen, C. (2016) Relationships between functional load and auditory confusability under different speech environments. Interspeech 2016, San Francisco, CA, USA, 08-12 Sep 2016. pp. 1094-1098. (doi:10.21437/Interspeech.2016-906)

This list was generated on Sat Dec 5 04:25:54 2020 GMT.

Supervision

I am interested in supervising experimental projects relating to psycholinguistics, speech perception, speech planning, lexical retrieval, bilingualism, and computational modeling of all these processes.

Please note: I am not available to supervise work on EFL, TEFL, or language pedagogy.

Potential students should be aware that my expertise leans heavily towards quantitative and computational methods. I do not have the expertise to supervise projects that employ only qualitative methods. Students do not need to be statistical programming experts to apply, but they should be prepared to learn a great deal of those skills over the course of their degree.

If you would like me to supervise your studies, please email me with the following information:

  • A research proposal (~10 pages), containing a brief literature review motivating their research question, planned methodology, and a statement of the predicted results. 
  • A summary of computational and statistical skills, in particular:
    • Any experience in progamming or scripting languages (e.g., Python, Perl, Praat, R). Even something as trivial as 'I spent a couple of weekends last summer poking around in Python'. It's fine if you haven't got it, but it will make picking up other skills in experimental design much easier.
    • Experience in inferential statistical analysis. It's fine if you haven't got it yet, but you'll definitely need to learn it. The following questions, in increasing order of knowledge, give an idea of what sort of expertise I care about:
      • Do you know what a p-value is?
      • Do you know the difference between a t-test and an ANOVA?
      • Do you know the difference between linear and logistic regression?
      • Do you know what mixed-effects (or hierarchical) regression models are?
      • Do you know the difference between Bayesian statistics and null-hypothesis significance testing?

Teaching

I teach or contribute to teaching on

I also convene the first year introductory Level 1 sequence