‌‌

‌‌

Dr Mohammed Al-Rawhani received a BSc in in Electronic & Telecommunication Engineering (Amman, 2004), an MSc in Electrical & Electronic Engineering (Glasgow, 2007) and a PhD in Electronic Integration Design & Implementation for Biomedical Applications in (Glasgow, 2012).   For one year he worked as a field engineer where he was part of a team responsible for installations of microwave communication systems in the remote area of the Republic of Yemen.   He is a Research Associate in the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow.  His research interests include design, integration, assembly, characterisation and evaluation of optical and biochemical diagnostic applications. His research focuses on the design of ASIC chips using high/low voltage CMOS such as that provided by AMS and Taiwan Semi-Conductors. The ASIC chips integrate optical and biochemical sensor arrays with other necessary conditioning circuits.

 

Dr Boon Chong Cheah received a BEng in Electronic & Electrical Engineering (Leeds, 2010), an MSc in Nanotechnology & Advanced Electronic Devices (Leeds, 2011) and a PhD in Electronics and Electrical engineering (Glasgow, 2016). His PhD research involved developing a personal metabolome machine for precision healthcare using CMOS sensor array technology.  He previously worked at Intel Corporation in 2012 and is currently a Research Assistant in the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow. His research interests include microsystems and electrochemical sensors, sensor systems, microfabrication, surface functionalisation, microfluidics and CMOS electronics.  He is currently working towards integrating enzyme/antibody immobilisation techniques with microfluidics/plasmonics on a CMOS chip for the Multicorder Project.

 

 Dr Chunxiao Hu received a BSc in Automation (China, 2008), his MSc in Microsystem Technology (Southampton, 2009) and his PhD in Microfluidic devices for nematodes (Southampton, 2013).  Following completion of his PhD, he worked as a Research Fellow at the University of Southampton, working on Nanowire/Nanoribbon ISFET for biosensing. He is currently a Research Associate in the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow. His research interests include lab on chip, microfluidics, C. elegans, platform integration, Nanowire/Nanoribbon, surface functionalization and biosensing. His research now mainly focuses on using CMOS based chemical sensors for multiple detection.

 

 Dr Srinivas Velugotla received a BTech in Electrical & Electronic Engineering (India, 2004), his MSc in Nanotechnology & Microfabrication (Wales, 2007) and his PhD in Electrical & Electronic Engineering (Edinburgh, 2013). He worked as a Research Assistant at the University of Wales, working on dip pen nanolithography using AFM. Following completion of his PhD he worked as a Research Assistant at the University of Edinburgh for 6 months developing dielectrophoresis based device for continuous separation of cells. He is currently a Research Assistant in the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow. His research interest include biochemical sensors, integration, microfluidics and dielectrophoresis. His research mainly focuses on developing the integration of microfluidics into a biochemical sensor and developing CMOS based chemical sensors.

Dr. James Beeley obtained B Eng (Hons) in Electronics & Electrical Engineering from the University of Glasgow in 1997, and PhD in Electronics & Electrical Engineering from the University of Glasgow in 2004. Research areas include parallel computer interconnection network hardware, electronic olfaction, CMOS ASIC design, fluorescence imaging and medical ultrasound. 

 

 

Claudio Accarino received an MSc in Biomedical Engineering (Strathclyde, 2014) and is currently pursuing a PhD on Integrative Sensing & Measurements with the Microsystem Technology Group and the Centre for Doctoral Training in Integrative Sensing and Measurements.  His research interest includes Microsystems and electrochemical sensors, CMOS electronics and imaging. 

 

Christos Giagkoulovits received a BSc in Physics (Greece, 2011) and an MSc in Electronics & Communications (Radioelectronics) (Greece, 2013). He is currently a research student working towards a PhD in Electrical & Electronic Engineering with the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow. His research interests include design of analog and mixed-mode CMOS integrated circuits for biomedical applications, low cost and low power biological sensors, sensor arrays and microsystems-inspired systems for sustainable lifestyle applications. He is currently building a CMOS microelectrode array of independent electrochemical cells with minimal crosstalk for biomedical applications as part of the Multicorder Programme.

 

 

Bence Nagy received a MEng in Microcomputer Systems Engineering (Glasgow, 2014).  His research interests include software, biosensors, electronics and microfabrication.  He is currently pursuing a PhD in Electronic & Electrical Engineering with the Microsystems Technology Group at the University of Glasgow.  His research focuses on integrating immunoassays with CMOS sensor technology for the Multicorder Project.

 

Valerio Francesco Annese (19/06/1991) received his B.Eng. degree in electronic and telecommunication engineering and his M.Sc. (Magna cum laude) degree in electronics engineering from the Technical University of Bari (Bari, Italy) in 2014 and 2016 respectively. From 04/2014 to 11/2016 he was research assistant at the "Design of Electronic Integrated Systems" laboratory (DEISLab) at the Technical University of Bari (Bari, Italy) where his research interests included brain-to-computer interfaces, biosignals acquisition/processing, FPGA programming and CMOS IC design. Currently, he is working toward the Ph.D. degree in electronic and electrical engineering at the University of Glasgow (Glasgow, UK) with the Microsystem Technology (MST) group. His research activities with the MST group include biosensors surface functionalization, drop-on-demand inkjet printing, device fabrication and post-processing, multiple enzyme assays.

 

Carl Dale is a postdoctoral researcher based at the Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Technologies (D&TT) housed within the Institute of Cellular Medicine at Newcastle University. He has a unique multidisciplinary skills set with experience in clinical biochemistry, nanotechnology and MEMS microfabrication. For the multicorder project, his skills are being utilised for the development of a CMOS biosensing system. His main focus being towards producing a point-of-care diagnostic test to assess the Human risk of developing cardiovascular disease by employing multicorder sensing technology. 

 

Christoph Busche completed a Diplom in Chemistry, followed by a PhD in Inorganic Chemistry in the group of Prof. Peter Comba on Molecular Magnetism, both at the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, Heidelberg, Germany. From May 2010 till October 2015 I was working as a Post-doctoral research associate in the group of Prof. Lee Cronin, University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Since October 2015 I am working as a Research Fellow at the University of Glasgow on a 5-year Royal Society of Edinburgh/Scottish Government Personal Research Fellowship. My interest in magnetic compounds and their uses was first sparked by my doctoral thesis at the University of Heidelberg. In my time, as postdoctoral researcher I pursued this interest by exploring the electronic, electrochemical and physicochemical behaviour of nanoscale molecular architectures. I went a step further by investigating their incorporation in electronic devices. My work is focused on understanding the redox and magnetic behaviour of coordination compounds via electrochemistry, EPR spectroscopy and magnetic measurements, to shed light on the possible use of these molecules in electronic devices. My private hobbies are hill waking, HEMA and photography, especially alternative photographic methods like cyanotype, argyrotype and other iron-based printing methods.