Events & Seminars

Scottish literature is involved in a number of internal and external events, including the calendar of seminars in the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies and events and activites associated with our Centre for Robert Burns Studies.

We also run the annual Glasgow Thomas Muir Lecture on Democracy and Civil Society.

Postgraduate Seminar Archive

2017

Friday 17th February, 4pm, room 101, 5 University Gardens, Glasgow University: David Malcolm, Scottish/Polish crime writer, translator, poet and Professor of English Literature at the University of Gdansk. A native of Aberdeen, David has lived and worked in Japan, the USA and Poland for over thirty years and is the author of The German Messenger, a WWI spy thriller, and a collection of short fiction, Radio Moscow and Other Stories. Come and hear him read from and discuss his own work, the continuing development of Scottish literary studies in Poland, and the relations between original writing, scholarship, translation and the international European context.  

Friday 13 October, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Domesticity, nationalism, poetry and ways of living. Professor Bashabi Fraser will be discussing the relations between Patrick Geddes, the Scots biologist, town-planner, inspiration of the 1920s Scottish Renaissance movement, and friend of the major Indian poet, author and Nobel prize-winner Rabindranath Tagore and Hugh MacDiarmid. Professor Fraser is also the co-editor with Alan Riach of the just-published collection Thali Katori: An Anthology of Scottish and South Asian Poetry, opening new perspectives on the relations between Scotland and India, from Walter Scott to the contemporary scene. She will read from her own poems to illustrate and prompt discussion on the themes of feminism, domesticity, nationalism, and the history of empire and identity.

Friday 3 November, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Jackie Kay, The Adoption Papers. After the unpredictably successful reading of MacDiarmid’s A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle last November we’re proposing a reading of the title poem-sequence from the current Scots Makar’s first book, The Adoption Papers, an autobiographical sequence in three parts and 10 chapters for a range of voices. This is one of the major poem-sequences of our times and the first, breakthrough work of the current Scots Makar, who follows Liz Lochhead and Edwin Morgan in that role.

Friday 10 November, at 4pm, in room 101, 7 University Gardens: Dr Jamie Reid-Baxter, independent scholar, musicologist, poet, composer and translator, will deliver an illustrated talk on ‘Scotland’s Renaissances of the Fifteenth/Sixteenth Century and of the Twentieth Century: Distinctions and Affinities’. Reference will be made to the great early poets of Medieval and Renaissance Scotland, including Elizabeth Melville, and then to Hugh MacDiarmid’s Golden Treasury of Scottish Poetry (1940).

Friday 17 November, at 4pm, in room 101, 7 University Gardens: Dr Pauline Mackay and Dr Craig Lamont: ‘Aspects of Editing Robert Burns’. Pauline will address: ‘Ramsay, Burns and the Rhetoric of the Body’. Pauline is Lecturer in Robert Burns Studies. In addition to co-editing the new Oxford Edition of Robert Burns’s Correspondence, she is currently researching the authorship and circulation of bawdry (sexually explicit verse and prose) in eighteenth-century Scotland. Craig is a Research Associate in the Centre for Robert Burns Studies. Building on a new bibliography of the Bard’s early editions, Craig is now working on the letters of Burns as part of the new Oxford Edition. His PhD thesis on Georgian Glasgow and cultural memory won the 2016 Ross Roy medal.

2016

Friday 21 October, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Emma Dymock (University of Edinburgh). Emma is the co-editor of the Collected Poems of Sorley MacLean and most recently the editor of the Collected Poems of Douglas Young. She will be talking about her work as an editor of the work of these major figures in modern Scottish literature and the interface between Gaelic, Scots and English-language poetry and politics in modern Scotland.

Friday 28 October, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Carl MacDougall (Scottish PEN). Scottish PEN (Playwrights, Essayists, Novelists) was established as an international writers’ union and supports writers throughout the world in situations of persecution. The Scottish office was established by Hugh MacDiarmid in 1927 and Carl MacDougall is currently Vice-President. A novelist, storyteller, broadcaster, and Scottish cultural historian, Carl will talk about his own work and the role of PEN in the 21st century.

Friday 11 November, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Gerda Stevenson (poet, playwright, actor, director): Gerda is one of Scotland’s foremost contemporary writers whose new poetry collection-in-progress centres on the theme of neglected Scottish women. Gerda’s talk and readings will engage with research, the ways in which scholarship and creativity inform each other, and other forms of 21st-century Scottish cultural production.

Friday 25 November, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Len Murray (Dean of the Guild of Robert Burns Speakers): ‘Why do the Scots make a fuss of Robert Burns?’ Len has travelled all across the world speaking on Burns.  In this talk he looks at some of the reasons for the poet’s world-wide fame and popularity.

Friday 2 December, 4pm, room 101, 7 University Gardens: Glasgow University Scottish Literature postgraduates and staff: To mark the 90th anniversary of the publication on 22November 1926 of Hugh MacDiarmid’s A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle (in an edition of 500 copies, only 90 of which sold in the first year), we’ll be reading the complete poem hopefully between 4 and 6pm, without a break, before end-of-term celebrations and appropriate pandemonium continue elsewhere.


Events Archive

Thursday 15 December, 6.15pm, Kelvin Hall was the book launch of Gerard Carruthers & Don Martin (eds.), Thomas Muir of Huntershill: Essays for the 21st Century. Sir Tom Devine opened the evening with a fine speech on Muir's era of Enlightenment. The volume shed new light on an often neglected figure of Scottish history, with contributions from Scottish Literature staff members Drs. Rhona Brown and Ronnie Young.


Past Events

Thursday 15 December, 6.15pm, Kelvin Hall was the book launch of Gerard Carruthers & Don Martin (eds.), Thomas Muir of Huntershill: Essays for the 21st Century. Sir Tom Devine opened the evening with a fine speech on Muir's era of Enlightenment. The volume shed new light on an often neglected figure of Scottish history, with contributions from Scottish Literature staff members Drs. Rhona Brown and Ronnie Young.