picture of Mental Health Resources Headerpic01

INTRODUCTION

Mental health problems are very common in the population and a complex phenomenon in the workplace. These can range from sub-clinical issues, for example psychological distress, to clinical disorders such as depression or generalised anxiety disorders. Psychosocial working conditions, also called job stressors, can affect all working people and trigger mental health issues. Amongst others, these job stressors may include heavy workload, multiple demands, tight deadlines, unexpected changes, job insecurity and interpersonal conflict. Such stressors can cause a number of mental health outcomes such as burnout, anxiety disorders, chronic stress and depression.

Watch this video to learn what stress is and what the long-term issues that chronic stress can lead to are.

Chronic stress, anxiety and other mental health issues are as common in academia as they are in other work environments. There is increasing recognition of a mental health crisis affecting graduate education, and many testimonials show that this crisis is taking a toll on everyone in the academic environment across job types and grades. The Science careers and mental health collection of the journal Nature has many accounts of the “hidden costs” of academic life on students, early career researchers and senior academics alike. These considerable impacts not only affect us as individuals, but also our work and personal relationships.

This website brings some of the many resources available through the University of Glasgow and other sources into one place in an attempt to improve mental health literacy, promote early intervention, suggest simple things you can do to look after your mental health, and provide details of “First Aid” support at the University of Glasgow and of healthcare organisations and charities who can offer expert advice and professional help.      

But before exploring these resources further, take a look at these simple exercises developed by Mind that you can try right now to feel calmer. How about focusing on your breathing for instance?