Undergraduate 

Biomedical Engineering BEng/MEng

Introduction To Biomedical Engineering 1 ENG1031

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Engineering
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

The aim of the course is to provide students with an introduction to the basic concepts of biomedical engineering. The course will be broadly divided into two halves. In the first, the students will gain an understanding of the structure and function of cells and tissues and the generation of electrical signals in cells. In the second part of the course, the students will be introduced to the basic concepts of biomedical engineering including fluid mechanics, imaging modalities, sensors and biocompatibility.

Timetable

2 x 1 Hour Lectures per week

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

None

Recommended Entry Requirements

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Examination 70%

Laboratory 10% on biocompatibility.

Group presentations on imaging, sensing, biofluids or biocompatbility (SCL) 20%.

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

The aims of this course are to:

■ introduce students to the structure and function of DNA and RNA and the basis by which genetic information is encoded within our genes;

■ introduce students to the structure and function of proteins and the basis by which genetic information encoded within our genes leads to protein expression;

■ introduce students to the structure of membranes, cells and tissues;

■ introduce students to the role of the membrane in the generation and transmission of the action potential;

■ describe the nervous system and how muscular contraction and reflex responses occur;

■ describe the sensory organs including the eye and the ear;

■ describe the vascular system and the unique role of fluids in the body;

■  introduce imaging methods to visualise healthy and diseased cells and tissues;

■  introduce analytical methods to sense signals from healthy and diseased cells and tissues;

■  introduce methods by which materials, including those used in implants and sensors, interact with biological systems.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ evaluate the relationship between the structure and function of DNA and RNA and how they encode for proteins;

■ evaluate the relationship between the structure and function of proteins and understand how they are encoded by the genetic code;

■ apply the knowledge of the molecular structure and function of DNA, RNA and proteins to understand the basis of healthy cells and disease;

■ apply the basic principles underlying the structure of the cell membrane and proteins to understand the nature of electrical excitability in cells;

■ demonstrate and understanding of the basis of the nervous system in the context of muscle contraction and the reflex response;

■ apply the knowledge of the structure and function of the eye and the ear to understand the sensory function of these organs;

■ evaluate the relationship between the role of biological fluids and their function in the context of their mechanical properties;

■ apply the knowledge of imaging methods to understand techniques to visualise healthy and diseased cells and tissues;

■ apply the knowledge of analytical methods to sense signals from healthy and diseased cells and tissues;

■ apply the knowledge of the ways by which materials, including those used in implants and sensors, interact with biological systems, to understand the concept of biocompatibility.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must attend the degree examination and submit at least 75% by weight of the other components of the course's summative assessment.

 

Students must attend the timetabled laboratory classes and all timetabled external seminars (4x1h) in semester 1.

 

Students should attend at least 75% of the timetabled classes of the course.

 

Note that these are minimum requirements: good students will achieve far higher participation/submission rates.  Any student who misses an assessment or a significant number of classes because of illness or other good cause should report this by completing a MyCampus absence report.