The Leslie and Elizabeth Alcock Library and Resource Centre

The Leslie and Elizabeth Alcock Library and Resource Centre

The Leslie and Elizabeth Alcock Library and Resource Centre for Historical Archaeology is a charitable trust established in 2005.

The purpose of the Library and Resource Centre is to encourage research into the study of historical archaeology, with particular reference to the early middle ages of Scotland and the British Isles. The Library and Resource Centre will achieve this by:

  • providing access to Alcock's collection of books, papers, notes and photographs for the use of postgraduate students and bone fide researchers
  • making bibliographical information and the catalogue of the collection available on the internet
  • promoting scholarship in the field of historical archaeology through the sponsorship of lectures and symposia

Leslie Alcock

Leslie Alcock passed away on 7 June 2006. He was the first professor of Archaeology at the University of Glasgow (1973-90) and a major figure in Scottish and British Archaeology. Details of his life can be read in various obituaries:

If you have memories or stories about the Alcocks that you think worthy of preservation please send them to Stephen Driscoll, who will ensure that they enter the archive and will make them available on the website as it is developed.

Catalogue of Books and Monographs

Details of the books and monographs from the Alcocks' collection held in the Library and Resource Centre are now available for download: Catalogue

Trustees

The trustees of the Alcock Trust for Historical Archaeology are:

  • Professor Christopher D. Morris
  • Professor Stephen T. Driscoll, University of Glasgow (Secretary)
  • Professor Ian B.M. Ralston, Kinross,
  • Dr Sally M. Foster, Edinburgh
  • Dr Philip Freeman, Hamilton

Sponsors

The Library and Resource Centre has been set up through because of the generosity of John Alcock and Penny A. Parkes, who donated their parents’ library and collection.

The work of cataloguing and preparing the material has been made possible through the financial support provided by:

  • The Hunter Archaeological Trust, Falkirk
  • The Hunter Marshall Bequest, University of Glasgow
  • The Russell Trust, Markinch, Fife
  • The Strathmartin Trust, St Andrews, Fife