Generous cyclists saddle-up for charity

Issued: Wed, 05 Aug 2009 15:23:00 BST

Hundreds of people will be saddling-up this month for the seventh annual Cycle Glasgow event to raise money for charity.

The event on Sunday 16 August, organised by the University of Glasgow, sees participants cycle from Glasgow to Clydebank, and back if they choose, to raise money for the Paul O’Gorman Leukaemia Research Centre.

To date, the event has raised more than £245,000 which has been integral in providing new facilities and equipment to run the centre. This year the centre has plans to create two new research groups, with one focusing solely on childhood leukaemia, and needs as much money as possible from generous donors.

The route, which is 13 or 26 miles, starts and finishes at Kelvingrove Park by Kelvin Way, with cyclists heading to Clydebank along the Kelvin Walkway and returning via the cycle path on the Forth and Clyde Canal.

The event is sponsored by Tunnock’s, Costco, Nethanfoot Farm, University of Glasgow Sports & Recreation Service, and University of Glasgow Estates & Buildings.

Entry to the event costs £8 per person or £3.50 for under-16s and those wishing to take part can register online or download an entry form, and sponsorship form, at www.gla.ac.uk/events/cycleglasgow


For more information, contact Stuart Forsyth in the University of Glasgow Media Relations Office on 0141 330 4831 or email s.forsyth@admin.gla.ac.uk

Notes to Editors
The Paul O'Gorman Leukaemia Research Centre at the University of Glasgow was officially opened on the 22nd of May 2008 by Dr Richard Rockefeller. The facility is state of the art and incorporates the latest research technologies and attracts international leaders in leukaemia research who translate laboratory findings into new treatments for patients.
Building the centre would not have been possible without the commitment and enthusiasm of more than 1,800 generous donors.  Our fundraising campaign continues with the focus now on staffing equipment and infrastructure.

<< August