Frequently Asked Questions

Advice and support for offer holders and future students

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When will programmes start in 2020/21?

All students

Freshers’ Week, including Welcome & Induction, begins on 14 September. See the FAQ 'Is Freshers’ Week and other welcome, orientation and induction activity happening?' for further information.

Wherever possible, you should aim to arrive in Glasgow for the start of your programme. If you cannot arrive on time, for instance, due to visa delays, travel restrictions or Covid-19 related medical/health reasons, you can start your studies online and transition to Glasgow when it is safe and feasible to do so.

Initially, most teaching will be delivered remotely during Semester 1, for as long as Public Health Scotland guidance requires two metre physical distancing.

However, the campus will be open with access to facilities and resources, providing essential face-to-face experiences in labs and other skills-based sessions. Individual and group study space will also be available. As guidance evolves, so too will the opportunities for on-campus activity.

Your Programme, School or College will be in touch directly with more detailed information about online access to your courses so you can begin your studies on time remotely.

See the Access to Registration information for when you will receive your 'Access Your Student Account' email.

Meanwhile, you can find more information about what learning & teaching will look like in the FAQ 'How will my programme be taught?'

Undergraduate students

The start of teaching for the majority of undergraduate programmes is 21 September 2020. 

Some programmes in Education have earlier start dates: 

Postgraduate taught students

September 2020

The majority of taught programmes will start teaching as planned on either the 14 or 21 September 2020: 

Wherever possible, you should aim to arrive in Glasgow for the start of your programme. If you are unable to travel to Glasgow in time, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, providing you transition to Glasgow as soon as you can. The previously stated latest arrival date of Monday, 12 October no longer applies.

Your Postgraduate taught programme will run to the usual academic year dates with graduation November-December 2021.

Please note, around 30 programmes have a 'dual start' option, offering a January 2021 start date as well as September 2020. This gives you the option to delay your studies to January if September is no longer viable for you. See FAQ 'Can I defer my 2020/21 place?'

November 2020

More than 50 taught programmes will now commence on 9 November 2020:

Wherever possible, you should aim to arrive in Glasgow for the start of your programme. If you are unable to travel to Glasgow in time, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, providing you transition to Glasgow as soon as you can.

Your Postgraduate taught programme will run for the usual duration, concluding 16 October 2021. We are currently exploring the possibility of graduation in December 2021.

January 2021

More than 80 taught programmes will now commence on 11 January 2021: 

Wherever possible, you should aim to arrive in Glasgow for the start of your programme. If you are unable to travel to Glasgow in time, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, providing you transition to Glasgow as soon as you can.

Your PG Taught programme will run for the usual duration, concluding 17 December 2021. We are currently exploring the possibility of graduation in late February 2022.

Please note, we will provide a range of Welcome & Induction activities for all PGT students, regardless of start date.

Online Distance Learning students

The start dates for postgraduate taught online distance learning students remain unchanged.

Postgraduate research students

The main start date for PG Research students, 1 October 2020, remains unchanged, with the usual flexibility to start at other times during the academic year. 

Programme alteration or discontinuation

The University will endeavour to run all programmes as indicated. In exceptional circumstances, however, we may alter or withdraw a programme.

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Do I need to come to study if lectures are online? 

All students 

Whilst we are encouraging all students to be at the University for the start of teaching, we appreciate that the first Semester will be different, and many of our students may face travel or medical/health challenges that make physical arrival difficult.

Currently, we need to maintain 2-metre physical distancing on campus. This severely restricts our ability to timetable as many face-to-face teaching events as we would like.  As a result, and to accommodate late arriving students, teaching will be delivered predominantly online and you can begin your studies remotely if necessary. 

However, our campus will be open with access to facilities and resources, providing essential face-to-face experiences in labs and other skills-based sessions. Individual and group study space will be available, as will access to academic and support staff. We anticipate this will remain the case as we continue to respond to changes in public health advice.  For example, implementing additional safeguards, or opening further facilities as the advice dictates.

We also intend to run events and activities to support you, and provide informal learning opportunities as well as social and cultural experiences. Our four student bodies (Students' Representative Council (SRC), Glasgow University Union (GUU), Queen Margaret Union (GUU) and Glasgow University Sports Association (GUSA)) are working hard to ensure there will be plenty of extracurricular activities throughout Freshers’ Week and beyond for you to enjoy.

If you are shielding or have other health-related concerns, please see the FAQ: 'What happens if I am shielding or have other health-related reasons that mean I cannot come on campus?'

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What should I do if I cannot get to the University for the start of my programme?

All students

If you believe you will be unable to travel to your campus in Glasgow or Dumfries in time to begin your programme, as a result of visa/travel restrictions or medical concerns, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, but you should transition to Glasgow or Dumfries as soon as you can.

Please refer to the Access to Registration information for when you will receive your 'Access Your Student Account' email.

Your Programme, School or College will be in touch directly with more detailed information about online access to your courses so you can begin your studies on time remotely.

You can also find lots of other useful information:

If you are shielding or have other health-related concerns, please see the FAQ: What happens if I am shielding or have other health-related reasons that mean I cannot come on campus?

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Why has my Postgraduate taught programme start date changed?

Postgraduate taught applicants

To support as many of our PG Taught offer holders and new applicants as possible, we have made changes to the start dates of some Postgraduate taught programmes, with the aim of providing as much flexibility as possible.

Programmes will now either start in September, as originally planned, November or January. Some programmes have a dual start of September and January.

To decide which programmes would start when, we:

  • extensively researched our offer holder preferences during May. The result was a clear preference to offer later options where possible, staggered between September 2020 and January 2021.
  • reviewed external surveys during April and May, indicating that overseas offer holders preferred a delayed start if it minimised the amount of online-only teaching they receive. They also point to travel, health and safety concerns about starting in September, with later starts allowing these factors to improve.
  • considered our capacity and ability to change the start dates of over 300 PG Taught programmes, normally comprising around 7000 students from 100+ countries. All 30,000 new and continuing UofG students require high quality access to academic and support staff, learning facilities and systems, in challenging circumstances.

These are highly complex considerations to inform quick decision-making, and our aim is to ensure we provide the best possible combination of remote and on-campus learning, and student experience, that we can.

As a result, we have made the difficult decision to offer September, November or January only start date options, based on the size and composition of each PG Taught programme, and our capacity to deliver the experience you rightly expect.

In addition, and to provide more flexibility than ever before, we have significantly expanded the quantity of programmes offering dual start dates.

Clearly, these changes will not suit everyone, and we will endeavour to support your decision-making in whatever way we can over the coming weeks.

Please see the FAQ below for further details on what to do next, including the possibility of transferring to another programme, should you remain concerned about your start date.

Thank you for your understanding.

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My new Postgraduate taught programme start date doesn’t suit me. What are my options?

Postgraduate taught programmes now have staggered start dates; in September, as originally planned, November or January. Some programmes have a dual start of September and January.

However, we appreciate that these changes may not suit everyone’s personal circumstances. If your programme start date has changed and is no longer suitable, you have the following options:

  • Explore your options for starting on the new date
  • See if other similar programmes that you are qualified for have a start date that better suits you, and ask us to change your offer
  • Consider deferring your studies to the 2021/22 academic year
  • Withdraw your 2020/21 application by declining your offer.

If you wish to request a change to your offer, please submit your request to pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk with the title “OFFER CHANGE” in the subject line. We will respond to your request within 14 working days.

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Can I still apply to commence study in 2020/21?

Undergraduate applicants

Application deadlines for UG programmes commencing September 2020 have been extended, where vacancies are available:

  • UK, International & EU applicants: 31 August 2020 (via UCAS, inclusive of Clearing)

Postgraduate taught applicants

September 2020

Application deadlines for PG Taught programmes commencing September 2020 have been extended, where vacancies are available:

  • International applicants: 10 August 2020 (Exceptions apply for certain high demand programmes. See programme webpage for details)
  • UK/EU applicants: 31 August 2020
November 2020

Application deadlines for PG Taught programmes now commencing November 2020 have been extended, where vacancies are available:

  • International applicants: 28 September 2020 (Exceptions apply for certain high demand programmes. See programme webpage for details)
  • UK/EU applicants: 19 October 2020
January 2021

Application deadlines for PG Taught programmes now commencing January 2021 have been extended, where vacancies are available:

  • International applicants: 27 November 2020 (Exceptions apply for certain high demand programmes. See programme webpage for details)
  • UK/EU applicants: 15 December 2020

See postgraduate taught programme teaching start dates 

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Has my deadline for accepting my 2020/21 offer changed?

Undergraduate applicants

UCAS

For UG applicants applying through UCAS, the deadline for acceptance is 18 June 2020. 

If you apply after this date through UCAS, your deadline for acceptance will be stated on UCAS Track and will be no later than 31 August 2020. If you apply via Clearing your deadline for acceptance will be communicated in your Clearing Offer Email. 

Common App

For International UG applicants applying through Common App before 16 June 2020, your deadline for acceptance is 30 June 2020. 

Changes to your offer and acceptance status will be sent to you via email.

Please send confirmation of your acceptance to ugadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk. 

Postgraduate taught applicants

September 2020

If you apply for a Postgraduate taught programme commencing September by 2 June 2020, your deadline for acceptance and payment of deposit (if required) is 30 June 2020. 

If you apply after 3 June 2020, prior to the 10 August 2020 (International) or 31 August 2020 (UK/EU) PGT application deadline, your acceptance date will be stated in your offer letter (typically 4 weeks).

November 2020

If you apply for a Postgraduate taught programme now commencing November by 17 August 2020, your deadline for acceptance and payment of deposit (if required) is 31 August 2020. 

If you apply after 18 August 2020, prior to the 28 September 2020 (International) or 19 October 2020 (UK/EU) PGT application deadline, your acceptance date will be stated in your offer letter (typically 4 weeks).

January 2021

If you apply for a Postgraduate taught programme now commencing in January by 2 June 2020, your deadline for acceptance and payment of deposit (if required) is 30 June 2020. 

If you apply after 3 June 2020, prior to the 27 November 2020 (International) or 15 December 2020 (UK/EU) PGT application deadline, your acceptance date will be stated in your offer letter (typically 4 weeks).

Please note, your deadline for acceptance and payment of deposit (if required) should be viewable in Applicant Self Service. If you view another date, please don’t be concerned, we will update it with your new date, as indicated above, as soon as possible.

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I’m an EU PG Taught offer holder for a programme that starts in January 2021. Do I need a visa?

Any EU student who may not arrive in UK before 31 December 2020 

Due to the UK's exit from the European Union, only those EU/EEA students who have started living in the UK by the 31st December 2020 can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

If entering the UK after this date, an EU/EAA student coming into the UK for longer than 6 months must obtain entry clearance through the UK visa process. This will also involve payment of the £470 per year healthcare surcharge to gain access to the National Health Service (application prior to October 2020: £300 per year study).

You may wish to explore the option of arriving early with your accommodation provider to establish proof of residence by 31 December, such as a signed tenancy agreement or contract. A hotel booking is not acceptable. 

If you haven't already, you can still apply for University accommodation (August 22 deadline) even if your programme doesn't start until January 2021.

If you wish to enquire whether a residence contract and arrival pre December 31st is possible for your particular circumstances, please contact Accommodation Services directly. They will consider availability and feasibility on a case by case basis.

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I am concerned about meeting the University’s English Language conditions

All applicants and offer holders

We understand the anxiety around whether offer holders and new applicants will be able to secure the requirements they need for entry onto their degree programme in 2020/21. In particular, with English language testing centres in different countries closed, there is concern about your ability to demonstrate that the English language requirement has been met.

We have taken some time to review the various English testing options which are available and are delighted that we can offer some flexibility to reassure offer holders and new applicants of your ability to meet these requirements. 

In addition, some Postgraduate taught programmes will now start in November 2020 or January 2021, providing you with more time and opportunity to meet the conditions of your offer.

Pre-Sessional English online courses will be available for students with programmes starting in January who still need to raise their English level to meet entry requirements.

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My school is closed / my exams may be delayed and I may not meet conditions

Undergraduate applicants

Where an applicants’ grades are demonstrably affected by any extenuating circumstances, flexibility can be offered by the exam board and our advice would be to contact them in the first instance, with support from your school. 

The University will look at cases on an individual basis and you can find information on how we do this: 

We reviewed the applications of existing offer holders during April & May to see who had met our minimum entry requirements through previous certified study. If it was possible to confirm your place ahead of exam result release, we have done so. If not, alternative conditions have been offered. 

Your Offer status can be viewed in UCAS Track.

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I will only receive provisional school exam results and I may be unable to send you my confirmed results

Undergraduate applicants

As evidence of completion of school examination results, we can accept either

  • your confirmed results  

or

  • a screenshot of your provisional results and a letter from your School or College confirming that your study has been completed

Documents can be sent as scans to ugadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk. All qualification documents should include:

  • Your Name
  • Your Date of Birth
  • Date of Award
  • Name of Award
  • Grade, GPA or classification
  • Name of Awarding Body

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My University has delayed examinations and I may be unable to send you my degree certificate

Postgraduate applicants

As evidence of completion of degree study, we can accept either

  • your final transcript

or

  • a screenshot of your final transcript and a letter from your University confirming that your degree has been completed.

Documents can be sent as scans and uploaded to Applicant Self Service. All qualification documents should include:

  • Your Name
  • Your Date of Birth
  • Date of Award
  • Name of Award
  • Grade, GPA or classification
  • Name of Institution or Awarding Body

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When do I need to pay the deposit stated in my offer?

Postgraduate taught applicants

If your offer states you are required to pay a deposit, the payment deadlines are as follows:

September

If your PG Taught programme is starting September 2020 and you apply before 2 June 2020, your deposit deadline is 30 June 2020. If you apply after this date, your deposit payment deadline will be stated in your offer letter.

November

If your PG Taught programme is now starting November 2020 and you apply before 17 August 2020, your deposit deadline is 31 August 2020. If you apply after this date, your deposit payment deadline will be stated in your offer letter.

January

If your PG Taught programme is now starting January 2021 and you apply before 2 June 2020, your deposit deadline is 30 June 2020.  If you apply after this date, your deposit payment deadline will be stated in your offer letter.

This information should be viewable in Applicant Self Service. 

If you have any queries, please don’t hesitate to contact us at pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk.

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When can I expect my Certificate of Acceptance to Study (CAS) / Can I request a change to my CAS?

International students only

CAS are issued on a rolling basis, from three months prior to your start date, upon meeting your conditions, accepting your updated offer and becoming an “Unconditional Firm” offer holder.

See the below timeline to receive your CAS:

Start Date CAS Issue Period Timeline for CAS Issue Last Date for CAS Issue
September now until 11 Sep up to 5 working days from accepting unconditional offer 11-Sep
November 1 Sep - 16 Oct up to 5 working days from accepting unconditional offer 16-Oct
January 19 Oct - 18 Dec up to 5 working days from accepting unconditional offer 18-Dec

Your CAS will state your programme start date:

  • 14 September 2020
  • 9 November 2020
  • 11 January 2021

Wherever possible you should aim to arrive in Glasgow for the start of your programme.

If you are unable to travel to Glasgow in time, due to visa delays, travel restrictions or Covid-19 related medical/health reasons, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, but must do so by your start date, providing you transition to Glasgow as soon as you can

Can I request a change to my CAS?

To give you the most flexible time period to arrive in Glasgow, the latest arrival date stated on all CAS issued from Monday, 10 August will be Monday, 18 January 2021.

If you have already received your CAS stating the latest start date of 12 October 2020 and will not be able to arrive in Glasgow by this time, please complete and submit this form:

We will update your CAS to the latest possible arrival date within the 6-month validity.

Please visit International Student Support for detailed information on the visa application process and any Covid-related updates in their Latest News. 

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My programme has a dual start in September and January. Can I choose when I start?

Postgraduate taught applicants

This year, around 30 programmes have a “dual start” option, offering a January 2021 start date as well as September 2020. This gives you the option to delay the start of your studies to January, if September is no longer viable for you.

If this is the case, your offer will automatically state September, however you can request a deferral to January if that better suits your circumstances.

To request a deferral to January, please contact PGadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk by 31 August.

Please note, where a programme has dual start dates, the University reserves the right to cancel one, or both, if necessary, on a programme by programme basis. If this is required, you will be automatically offered the next available start date.

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How will my programme be taught?

All students

The University is committed to interactive teaching and will continue to prioritise this remotely, to keep you safe and well throughout your Semester 1 studies.  

You should expect a combination of remote learning and, where feasible, essential face-to-face experiences in laboratories and other skills-based sessions will be held on campus. On-campus learning will be supported by use of on-campus study spaces and contact with your Adviser of Studies and Lecturers.

Lectures, Seminars & Tutorials

As long as the 2-metre physical distancing rules required by the Scottish Government are in place, we are required to deliver large group teaching remotely, because we cannot bring large groups of students together in a teaching space.  

This means that we will provide pre-recorded or live lectures, tutorial and seminar sessions and other learning materials through our virtual learning environment (VLE). These teaching experiences will be enhanced by learning activities and guided reading, as would normally be the case. These may involve guest speaker input, simulation activities, peer support and other interactive experiences.

Campus Teaching

We understand the importance of the on-campus experience to you and we are committed to prioritising safe teaching on campus, as much as physical distancing rules allow. We anticipate on-campus teaching will take place increasingly throughout your programme of study. As we increase on-campus provision, we will prioritise the delivery of teaching in small groups, such as tutorials, specialist skills sessions and labs.

Learning Facilities

Access to library and study space on campus will be provided throughout your period of study, in ways that observe physical distancing requirements, so that our students and staff are always safe.

Other experiences

We also intend to run events and activities to support you, and provide informal learning opportunities as well as social and cultural experiences. Our four student organisations (Students' Representative Council (SRC), Glasgow University Union (GUU), Queen Margaret Union (GUU) and Glasgow University Sports Association (GUSA)) are working hard to ensure there will be plenty of extracurricular activities throughout Freshers’ Week and beyond for you to enjoy.

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Will I be able to live in University accommodation?

All applicants & offer holders

Yes, and we encourage you to apply for accommodation as soon as you Firm accept your offer, regardless of when your programme is due to start.

We guarantee University accommodation for all 1st Year Undergraduate students who apply and meet the required criteria, see:

A full set of Accommodation FAQs are online, split by Application, Covid-19 (including information about quarantine arrangements), Pre-arrival and Residence Life.

Postgraduate accommodation is available on a first come, first served basis.

Whilst we cannot guarantee accommodation for families and returning or later year students, there may be a limited number of rooms that become available as the allocation process proceeds. These rooms will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

Depending on requirements stipulated by government or public health officials, we may have to make short notice adjustments to our allocations policy, including consideration of where you are travelling from to come to Glasgow.

Health & Safety in University accommodation

We take the health and safety of our residents very seriously. We are currently working through each residence to ensure that physical distancing arrangements and protocols are implemented. This may mean that some social spaces have restricted access or capacity. Strict guidelines about use of communal kitchens in residences are also likely. If you are allocated a room in a cluster flat, residents of each flat will be treated as one household and will be asked to follow relevant public health guidance accordingly. 

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Is Freshers’ Week and other welcome, orientation and induction activity happening?

All students

Yes, they are but in different ways to previous years, with a combination of online and on-campus activities*.

Joining Team UofG during the 2020/21 academic year will be like no other, and we are working hard to ensure your transition to the University of Glasgow is as exciting, informative and safe as it can possibly be.

As well as re-imagining  Freshers’ Week, we have introduced new online orientation modules for you to work through to help you prepare for University and Glasgow life.

Your School / College will also be providing academic orientation and induction activities to help you get the best possible start. 

Find out more, including a handy checklist to guide you through what you might need to do and when:

* Please remember that in person and on-campus activities will only proceed if permitted under Public Health Scotland guidance at the time.  Your health and safety is our top priority so plans may change, possibly at short notice.

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What will the University be doing to protect my health and wellbeing?

All students

We are taking comprehensive steps to protect the health and wellbeing of every student.  Glasgow has the advantage of having the largest Medical School in Scotland and a highly qualified team of experts who are informing our approach to keep the UofG community safe. We manage one of the three main testing centres in the UK, have a range of Covid-19 related research underway, and are currently testing a Covid-19 vaccine in collaboration with our colleagues in Oxford.  All of this expertise is being used to ensure that health and safety at Glasgow is second to none.

We will always closely follow national guidelines, potentially going beyond them at times, learning from the best practice from around the world. This inevitably has consequences for life on campus.  

This isn’t a complete list of the measures we will take, but hopefully gives you a sense of our commitment to your safety during 2020/21:

  • All members of the University community will need to abide by clear rules relating to personal hygiene and the way they interact with others 
  • A thorough cleaning regime will apply in all spaces used by students and staff
  • We will operate one-way systems in corridors of buildings 
  • The numbers allowed in any given building or room will be limited to avoid congestion 
  • We will issue all staff and students with face coverings and encourage their use in certain environments 
  • We are investigating the implementation of temperature checks on campus, to identify as soon as possible, anyone who may have contracted Covid-19
  • Anyone who is showing symptoms of Covid-19 will be asked to undertake a test and may have to self-isolate; those who have been in contact with them will be identified and will also be asked to take tests
  • Some facilities (for example, sadly, the night clubs in the student unions and some sports facilities) will remain closed for the time being
  • To reduce congestion on campus, many staff will continue to work mostly from home 
  • Rooms across campus will be reallocated to support face-to-face teaching in smaller groups
  • Special rules will apply in confined spaces, such as cafes and toilets, to make physical distancing as easy as possible, and to ensure the highest standards of hygiene. 

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What happens if I am shielding or have other health-related reasons that mean I cannot come on campus? 

All students

If you are shielding or have other health-related personal circumstances that mean that you cannot come to campus and study safely, even with all the health measures in place, then we will look at your case individually to see what is possible. 

Depending on what you are studying, we may be able to support you studying fully at a distance, however, we will not be able to replicate every aspect of the on-campus learning experience.  

For some programmes, it may not be possible to complete your studies without being on campus because there may be requirements to demonstrate particular skills (e.g. clinical or laboratory assessments). 

If you have concerns about beginning your studies, please contact us via the relevant email:

Undergraduate students

Postgraduate students

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Can I defer my 2020/21 place?

The deadline for requesting a deferral to 2021/22 has now passed for all 2020 applicants. ;

Applicants to Postgraduate taught programmes with both September and January start dates can apply for a deferral from September to January (or a revocation) until 30 September 2020.

If you wish to defer within Academic Year ;2020/21 you can email pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk with the subject heading “Deferral Request”. Admissions cannot guarantee a deferral if this subject heading is not used.

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Can I cancel my deferral?

If you have already deferred your place to 2021/22, but would now prefer to commence 2020/21 instead, you can make a request to change your start date.

Undergraduate applicants

You can request a cancellation of your deferral via ugadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk until 31 August 2020.

Postgraduate taught applicants

For Postgraduate taught programmes commencing September, November or January, you can make a request to cancel your deferral by contacting PGadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk up to 31 August 2020. Decisions will be communicated in line with the dates for deferral requests listed above.

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Will I lose my scholarship if I defer my place?

If you have the option of deferring within the 2020/21 academic year, from September 2020 to January 2021, and are in receipt of a scholarship offer, you will not lose your scholarship if you decide to defer; it can be moved to your January start date. However, all scholarship deferral requests need to be actioned by the Scholarship Team, so please contact scholarships@glasgow.ac.uk at the same time as requesting deferral of your offer.

Unfortunately, if you choose to defer your start to the following academic year, you will lose your scholarship offer and need to re-apply alongside other applicants for the 2021/22 academic year.

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If I am unable to start study will you refund my deposit?

All applicants & offer holders

If you have paid a deposit and are unable to join our 2020/21 programmes, or consider deferral to 2021/22 as a result of the impact of coronavirus, please send your refund requests to: PGadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

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How can I contact Admissions with a specific enquiry?

All applicants & offer holders

You can contact Admissions if you have queries regarding:

  • Your application
  • Your offer
  • Meeting your conditions
  • Your CAS (International Students only)

Via the email below:

For queries regarding your learning and teaching delivery, your Programme, School or College will be in touch directly with more detailed information.

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Advice and support for current students

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What changes can I expect to my University experience?

The University has had to respond to the Covid 19 pandemic in a number of ways.  This includes the way that we provide teaching and assessment, and the way we provide services and facilities to students on-campus. Our top priorities always have been and will remain the health and wellbeing of the University community and providing high-quality learning experiences and support to our students.  The following section sets out the key changes you might expect, but in some cases (for example, for particular academic programmes) there may be other changes.  You should look out for further communications from your School and/or Programme contacts for details. 

We believe wholeheartedly that whilst the University experience in 2020/21 will be different, it will be full and engaging, as previous sessions have been.  Of course, for those who live in Glasgow or are able to travel, the rest of the city of Glasgow and all it has to offer is still available to you. There is more information available on our webpages about safety measures introduced on our campus.

Learning and Teaching 

The main change to learning and teaching is that the majority of learning experiences across the University will be provided online in Semester 1, rather than through face-to-face teachingAs long as the 2-metre physical distancing rules required by the Scottish Government are in place, we are required to deliver large group teaching remotely, because we cannot bring large groups of students together in a teaching space.   

This means that we will provide pre-recorded or live lectures, tutorial and seminar sessions and other learning materials through our virtual learning environment (VLE). These teaching experiences will be enhanced by learning activities and guided reading, as would normally be the case. These may involve guest speaker input, simulation activities, peer support and other interactive experiences. 

Where we can do so safely, we will facilitate small-group activities and events to support your learning. In addition, for programmes where practical and/or skills-based learning and teaching is a requirement, we will free up space on campus for access to laboratories and other practical sessions wherever possible. 

Assessment 

Since the introduction of restrictions as a result of the pandemic the University has moved the vast majority of assessment to an online format – electronically submitted coursework, open book exams and timed exams.  These have proved to be successful and we anticipate that for the foreseeable future (as a result of the pandemic) this is likely to remain the format for the vast majority of assessments.  However, for certain programmes where skills or competence have to be assessed through practical assessments or projects, Schools and/or Programme leaders are working on plans for how these will be delivered with the relevant safeguards in place.  

Campus facilities and services 

Our campus is open and many services and facilities are operating, with appropriate safeguards in place -for example, through the use of physical distancing, face coverings, and enhanced cleaning regimes. Access to library and study space on campus will be provided throughout your period of study, subject to appropriate safeguards, so that our students and staff are always safe. Given that most learning and teaching will be delivered online in semester 1 we expect to provide a mixture of in-person access to services and support, and support delivered through online means. This will ensure that students based on campus, and those at a distance, are appropriately catered for.  

Within campus buildings, face coverings should be worn by colleagues and students who are able to do so, except when they are sitting down and able to maintain a 2m distance from others. The requirements in research facilities will be determined by bespoke risk assessments which will be reviewed by the Director of Health, Safety and Wellbeing. In teaching, study and meetings spaces there is no requirement to wear face coverings once seated.  However, students and members of staff may choose to wear cloth or paper face coverings.  We will also make visors available for those who wish to use them. We ask that everyone is respectful of those who, for whatever reason, are unable to wear face coverings and that everyone adheres to our dignity at work and study policies

Wider learning experiences, social and cultural activities on campus 

Because we are delivering the bulk of teaching online, we expect to free up some spaces on campus for alternative uses.  We plan to offer a range of events and experiences using these spaces. For example, TED-style talks, events exploring some of the cutting-edge research taking place at the University and other opportunities for students to get to know staff members and fellow students. Our student organisations (Students' Representative Council (SRC), Glasgow University Union (GUU), Queen Margaret Union (GUU) and Glasgow University Sports Association (GUSA)) are also planning a range of events and activities to ensure you have a fulfilling and rewarding experience at the University. 

If you have concerns about any aspect of your University experience you can use the UofG Helpdesk to find out more information or seek support.  Your School will also have been in touch and, if your question relates to your particular programme of study, then contacts in your School will be best placed to advise you.  

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What should I do if I cannot get to the University for the start of my programme?

If you believe you will be unable to travel to your campus in Glasgow or Dumfries in time for the start of the academic year, as a result of visa/travel restrictions or medical concerns, you can register, enrol and commence study remotely, but you should transition to Glasgow or Dumfries as soon as you can. 

Please refer to the Access to Registration information for when you will receive your 'Access Your Student Account' email. 

Your Programme, School or College will be in touch directly with more detailed information about online access to your courses so you can begin your studies on time remotely. 

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What happens if I am shielding or have other health-related reasons that mean I cannot come on campus?  

If you are shielding or have other health-related personal circumstances that mean that you cannot come to campus and study safely, even with all the health measures in place, then we will look at your case individually to see what is possible.  

Depending on what you are studying, we may be able to support you studying fully at a distance, however, we will not be able to replicate every aspect of the on-campus learning experience.   

For some programmes, it may not be possible to complete your studies without being on campus because there may be requirements to demonstrate particular skills (e.g. clinical or laboratory assessments).  

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Will graduations be going ahead?

It is with a very heavy heart that I have to announce that we will not be holding our winter graduation ceremonies which are due to begin on the 30th of November.  This decision has been taken with a great deal of regret and after careful consideration of the Scottish Government Coronavirus restrictions. We felt it important to provide certainty at an early stage to ensure that our students and their friends and families didn’t make plans that would have to be cancelled later.

The degrees which students have worked so hard to earn will be sent out by post by the 18th of December. We are planning online celebrations during the week of graduations and we will invite you to attend a future ceremony on campus. These future ceremonies, which we hope to hold in 2021, will have the same form as our standard graduation ceremonies and will allow you to celebrate with your families and friends.

Students will be required to enrol to graduate as normal so that we can ensure that the University gathers all the relevant information to allow the parchment to be sent out. You will receive further information about enrolling for graduation in due course.

All of the staff who look forward to sharing the special time that is graduation are extremely sorry, but we realise that this is only a fraction of the disappointment that students will be feeling.

My sincere apologies at having to make, and communicate, this very difficult decision. My very best wishes to all students as they complete their studies and to the whole of our University of Glasgow community.

Students at our partner institutions in China and Singapore will be informed separately about arrangements for them, as soon as these are confirmed. 

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Is the Library open?

The Library is open, albeit with restrictions in place. Please see the Library webpages for more information.

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Advice for PGRs

The document Approach to supporting PGR [PDF] describes the University's approach to mitigating the impact of COVID-19 on postgraduate research students.

The approach sets out to support students in their funded period, at any stage of their studies, regardless of funding source, as well as those who are self-funded and who are within the minimum period of their degree.

Students will be supported based on the impact that the pandemic has had on their project or on their ability to progress their project.

The document also describes the support made available by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) to UKRU-funded doctoral students in their final year who have been impacted by COVID-19.

Please note there is more information in the 'Advice for researchers' section.

I’m a PGR student, can I still meet my supervisor? 

Current guidance suggests that you should arrange to meet virtually with your supervisor or other colleagues. Many staff are currently working remotely, and the University provides tools to support remote working and communications.

There may be reasons why you need to be on campus (e.g. lab work) but please consult your supervisor or PI for current guidance or rotas for attendance to ensure colleagues are working safely.

I am a PGstudent with field work to do, can I still do this? 

You should talk to your supervisor about this and decide what is appropriate for your project. There are so many different types of field work that an individual response is needed. You should follow the travel guidance within these FAQs below and consider the social aspects of any field work when you decide upon the best course of action. If there are funding conditions that are concerning you, then speak to your supervisor who in turn can seek advice from the University as it relates to any funding or degree requirements. 

I am an International PGR student, can I do my research remotely?

You should speak to your supervisor about your particular circumstances. If you can do your project with remote supervision and are able to continue working, there is no reason why you should not. If you choose to leave the UK, the University will maintain sponsorship of your Tier 4 visa, providing you continue to engage in your studies whilst you are away. This means your visa will remain valid and you will be able to use it to return to Glasgow at a later date.

I am a PGR student and want to work from home, can I do this? 

You should discuss the details with your supervisor but there are likely to be many aspects of your research that can be done remotely. The University provides tools like Office 365, which should allow you to connect to the University and other colleagues and collaborators: see, Glasgow Anywhere. It is, however, important for your work and for your personal wellbeing that you keep in touch with your supervisor and other colleagues.

My PG research is lab-based so if I cannot come into the University, my work will be delayed or otherwise negatively impacted. What should I do? 

Please speak to your supervisor or PI about your specific circumstances; students’ circumstances will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. This is an opportunity to focus on writing, reflection and other tasks that can be undertaken outside the lab as appropriate to your work.  

You may feel that your work has been negatively impacted and this will be assessed, and any appropriate mitigation put in to place, once we have moved past this uncertain period. 

The University and your College, School and/or Institute understand that aspects of your work will be delayed, or will perhaps need to be rethought or reorganised, but you will be supported to do so that you are able to satisfactorily complete your work. 

I am a PGR student, what if I need to take time off for sickness?  

Please follow the University policy for sickness absence you should record your absence on MyCampus and remain in contact with your supervisor as much as you can. The policy states that you can take up to 13 weeks absence in a 12-month period without suspending your studies for medical reasons. A suspension would be required for longer periods. Medical certification will be requested on a case-by-case basis. How this affects your existing funding will vary by funder and you should seek advice from your Graduate School if this is concerning you. 

What if my PhD supervisor is off due to illness and is either out of contact or unable to support me for a period of time? 

Your secondary supervisor should become your main point of contact if your primary supervisor is unavailable.

The Postgraduate Convenor(s) in your School or Institute are an additional point of contact if you are struggling because you are unable to communicate with your supervisor(s).

Your Graduate School also exists to support you so please do reach out.   

What if I have already made travel arrangements for a trip that is now cancelled, is this covered by travel insurance?

Information about making a claim can be found at: How to Make a Travel Insurance Claim

If you are a PGR student and not able to get a refund through travel insurance, please make expense claims as normal as we would not expect students to bear the burden of costs themselves where this would otherwise be paid for by a funder or other source of support.

Would it not be easier to just take a leave of absence from my PhD studies? 

We would not encourage this unless circumstances warranted it. PGRs generally have several tasks, e.g. reading and writing, that can be completed off-campus where necessary. Unless you are affected by physical or mental ill-health, we would expect you to keep working. The University remains open even if many staff and students are working off-site.   

We are due to have annual PhD progress review (APR) meetings shortly, will these be cancelled? What will happen instead? 

Guidance will continue to be released by Graduate Schools about this as the situation is assessed and arrangements are agreed. You should expect that APRs will take place, and that the details of local arrangements will be confirmed with you in due course. You will be informed in plenty of time for you to prepare. 

I am due to have my PhD Viva shortly, will this be cancelled? Can I participate remotely? 

You should contact your Graduate School to confirm the arrangements. In some cases, it may be possible for an external examiner to participate remotely. In some cases, your Viva may be postponed. We appreciate that a postponement may cause issues with offers of employment, visas, or other arrangements or that you may have expected to travel back to Glasgow for your viva and are now not able to.

Please discuss any issues with your Graduate School as soon as possible to ensure that any changes to current arrangements can be agreed.   

I’m a PGR student and have a Tier 4 visa, can I return home?

For international students who intend to go home, we would ask that you check the quarantining arrangements of your home country, to minimise the risk of transmission. You should also check your travel insurance.

If you do go home, the University will maintain sponsorship of your Tier 4 visa, providing you continue to engage in your studies whilst you are away. This means your visa will remain valid and you will be able to use it to return to Glasgow at a later date.

If you return home, unless your specific circumstances dictate otherwise, you should treat this as working remotely and discuss any issues or required support with your supervisor. 

I’m a PGR student and have a Tier 4 visa, what if I need to take time off for illness?

You may take sick leave as any other student. If you require a leave of absence due to illness, you must adhere to the terms of your visa and may not suspend your studies for longer than 60 days while remaining in the UK. It is important that you remain in touch with your supervisor during this time.

If your circumstances require a longer suspension, please contact International Student Support for additional information.

What should I do if I need proof or documentation from the University related to my circumstances and/or ability to complete my PhD work in a timely fashion? 

Any supporting letter or other documentation required to support you in requests to funders, government bodies, etc. will be provided to you in due course to sort out any issues related to research, travel, funding or other issues related to your study. Staff will deal with these requests as swiftly as possible, but please bear in mind that there may be many students making such requests. 

I am already away from the University on PhD-related fieldwork or a research trip, should I return to the UK? What if I need support? 

Foreign & Commonwealth Office has issued 2 exceptional global travel advisory notices for British people.

  • Return to the UK now if you’re travelling abroad and
  • Do not travel abroad unless it’s essential

Foreign & Commonwealth Office: Guidance for British people travelling overseas during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Traveline Scotland:  Returning to Scotland from abroad +44(0)141 465 1878 

Keeping in mind limitations on chartered flights available, and the fact that the advice relates to British nationals returning to the UK, you may or may not be able to return home whether that is to the UK or elsewhere.

Selective

If you booked travel through our travel provider, Selective, they will have been in touch to find out if you wish to return home and you must respond immediately if you do. Your travel insurance will support you in this, where possible, and ‘travel assistance’ may be available under the University’s insurance provision. If you made your own travel arrangements and/ or did not take the University’s travel insurance and are experiencing difficulties, please contact the Gatehouse on +44 141 330 4282.

You may be in an area in which there is little disruption or you may prefer not to travel at this time. If you are safe and well where you are, and you wish to remain, you may choose to do this. Your decision should be supported by an update of your risk assessment in discussion and agreement with your supervisor/ manager and this should be forwarded to Selina.Woolcott@glasgow.ac.uk (the Director of Health, Safety and Wellbeing). Please keep an eye on relevant advice which continues to change and stay in touch with your supervisor/ line manager. Also, do make sure that you can extend your accommodation, visa and health insurance, should the need arise, and that you can afford to stay on!

If you are a student, you should also keep in touch with the Study Abroad & Exchanges team (goabroad@glasgow.ac.uk) and let them know your plans so that we can continue to support you appropriately

How do any delays to my PhD research affect my funding? 

This will vary by funder and their particular terms and conditions. Funders are still working on additional guidance so please keep in mind that this is an evolving situation. Working within any guidelines provided, the University will take a similar pragmatic and sensitive approach to communicating with funders on behalf of students and working to ensure that any negative consequences are minimised.

What should I do if I’m signed up to do a training course for PGRs run by the University? 

In most cases you should be contacted directly about what arrangements are in place. Where at all possible, courses are being converted to webinars or otherwise put online. This won’t be suitable for all kinds of training so please keep an eye on your emails for communications.

Training is organised by different entities within the University, so you are advised to contact your Graduate School or relevant Service (e.g. IT Services, Library, Research and Innovation, etc.) if in doubt.

I’m a PGR due to submit my softbound thesis, how can I do this if staff are working at home? 

Submission of a softbound thesis is no longer required. All theses must be submitted online using the University’s file transfer system. The address for submission via this system should be your Graduate School’s main email address unless advised otherwise by your Graduate School. 

I’m a PGR due to submit my final hardbound thesis, how can I do this if staff are working at home?

It is sufficient for the time being to provide your final thesis electronically to the Library, rather than providing a hard-bound copy.

Create your record on Enlighten: Theses and use the  University’s file transfer system to provide files to theses@glasgow.ac.uk. Completed thesis access declaration forms can be sent by file transfer too. Electronic versions of theses under embargo/copyright restriction will not be uploaded to your record but will be securely archived in the usual way.

You may provide a hardbound copy of the thesis at a later date, but the award will no longer be contingent on provision of a physical copy - electronic receipt of the final version of the thesis will be considered sufficient for award of the degree. You will receive instructions regarding this when it has been confirmed by the examiners that any corrections have been addressed.

I’m a GTA and I depend on payment for this work, will I still be paid?

GTAs and demonstrators who would have expected to be delivering teaching but whose classes do not take place will still be paid for these sessions.

What if my progress and/or data collection is delayed by having to work at home?

You should continue to do what you can, discuss your challenges with your supervisor and document your challenges. We are working with funders and with other institutions to identify the best way to support researchers whose work has been adversely affected by the disruption; any request for support will be made easier by good record keeping and your ability to be specific in that request. We will continue to review our policies and ensure that in the aftermath of this crisis students are able to complete in as timely a fashion as possible.

I am a parent or have caring responsibilities.  What if I am unable to do sufficient work to continue to make progress on my research?

The short answer is that this is individual to your circumstances and there is no guidance or support that would suit everyone.  Fundamentally, if you can keep working, you should - even at a reduced rate. Please discuss any issues with your supervisor; they should be able to help you work out a plan or assess the feasibility of your approach. 

We are working with funders and with other institutions to identify the best way to support researchers whose work has been adversely affected by the disruption; any request for support will be made easier by good record keeping and your ability to be specific in that request. We will continue to review our policies and ensure that in the aftermath of this crisis students are able to complete in as timely a fashion as possible.

What if I am unable to undertake required training courses in time for my Annual Progress Review?

You will not be prevented from progressing if current circumstances prevent you completing a required training course. This applies to courses such as ‘research integrity’ which are required but not required before specific activity is undertaken.

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What is the University doing with its catering outlets? 

Catering outlets having been impacted by Covid related restrictions, please refer to our Catering & Events pages for further information.

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What is the University doing to minimise the risk of infection?

We are taking steps to ensure that we reduce the risk of infection for both students and staff.  As we have explained, we will be conducting the majority olearning, teaching and assessment online initially.  In accordance with current public health advice, bringing large numbers of students together in teaching spaces is not possible to do safely at this time.  However, many areas of the campus are open, and services are available to students.  Where this is the case, we will be taking the following steps: 

  • All members of the University community will need to observe guidance around hygiene and in relation to interactions with others 
  • An enhanced cleaning regime will apply in all spaces used by students and staff 
  • We will operate one-way systems in corridors of buildings, where these can be safely implemented 
  • There will be specific guidance for those living in student residences regarding access to kitchens and any shared household facilities 
  • The numbers allowed in any building or room will be limited to avoid congestion 
  • We will issue all staff and students with face coverings and encourage their use in certain environments 
  • Anyone who is showing symptoms will be asked to undertake a test and may have to self-isolate; we will aim to identify those who have been in contact with them and ask them to take a test 
  • Some facilities (for example the night clubs in the student unions and some sports facilities) will remain closed for the time being 
  • Again, to reduce congestion on campus, many staff will work mostly from home 
  • Special rules will apply in confined spaces such as cafes and toilets, again to make physical distance as easy as possible and to ensure the highest standards of hygiene. 

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Dignity and Respect

There is the unfortunate possibility that current events may cause an increase in incidents of racial harassment, aggression or abuse which some students and staff might face either on or off campus. This is never acceptable. If you face any negative or abusive comments or behaviour from anyone, you should tell someone and seek support from the SRC Advice Centre, your personal tutor or supervisor, or from the Human Resources team. Any conversations will be handled with due care and confidentiality, and our staff will work with you to find the appropriate means of safety and redress.  

Students who experience a crisis outside regular working hours can contact the University for support through the University Security 24/7 contact number 0141 330 4444, or report an incident online.

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I have a field trip planned, what is the University’s position on field trips?

It is expected that some field trips may be able to take place as Covid restrictions are eased. If this is possible, Schools will arrange this in conjunction with any students involved. Schools are also being asked to consider alternative provision for assessed work related to field trips in case further travel restrictions are imposed.  

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Are the sport facilities open?

Some sport facilities may be affected by the ongoing restrictions, please refer to our Sport webpages for more information.

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Can I stay in my University accommodation?

Please refer to our separate FAQs for student accommodation: 

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What financial support is available to students?

We have announced details of an emergency financial support package for students.

More details can be found here: University of Glasgow financial aid 

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What other student support is available?

Whilst face to face teaching and in person assessment will initially be restricted in the 2020/21 academic year, we are still committed to supporting you in your learning at the University: 

If you need advice on academic writing and skills, or on preparing for assessments, you can access guidance and book 1 to 1 appointments with our team of learning ad visers. Our disability advisors are also on hand to provide guidance in relation to reasonable adjustments. You can contact the Disability Service at disability@glasgow.ac.uk or by calling 0141 330 5497 

If you are feeling anxious or concerned about the current situation and, in particular, the impact on your learning and assessment, you can discuss this with others on Togetherall, or email  studentcounselling@glasgow.ac.uk or call 0141 330 4528 to speak to a member of our team in confidence 

We are not able to compensate you for loss of earnings as a result of the current situation, but we may be able to help if you are currently in financial hardship. 

The University’s student enquiry team and all other services (including support for students in our residences and for international students) continue to operate during this period and so please do not hesitate to contact us. 

There is an online UofG helpdesk where you can get the answer to any questions you may have. This also provides for IT support. 

While studying off campus you can find useful Library and IT resources as well as online training and guides from Glasgow Anywhere 

At times like these, we need to look out for one another. The Glasgow Mutual Aid Group is a group of volunteers, helping to support some of the most vulnerable people in the city at this time.   

The SRC continues to provide independent, confidential advice on academic and non-academic issues. 

These are extraordinary times and many of us are feeling unsettled and anxious.  Please keep safe, look after yourself and look out for others.  And if you need us, get in touch. 

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Advice and support for staff

For information relating to HR policy, please see the HR staff info webpages.

This includes:

  • Information about furlough
  • Annual leave, childcare and other HR policies
  • Information on isolation and how it will impact staff at work
  • Guidance on training and development while in lockdown

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What preparations are we putting in place for staff returning to campus?

Our Guide for Staff outlines how we expect our campus to operate as we begin to see more activity taking place onsite, and the measures that we are introducing to support staff returning to work on our campuses.

There are details about the operations being supported in each phase of our recovery programme, available through our Recovery Route Map

Within campus buildings, face coverings should be worn by colleagues and students who are able to do so, except when they are sitting down and able to maintain a 2m distance from others. There is more information available on our webpages about safety measures introduced on our campus.

 

The requirements in research facilities will be determined by bespoke risk assessments which will be reviewed by the Director of Health, Safety and Wellbeing.

In teaching, study and meetings spaces there is no requirement to wear face coverings once seated.  However, students and members of staff may choose to wear cloth or paper face coverings.  We will also make visors available for those who wish to use them.

We ask that everyone is respectful of those who, for whatever reason, are unable to wear face coverings and that everyone adheres to our dignity at work and study policies

 

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I need to access a building, how do I arrange this?

Generally, if you need to collect equipment from your office, please contact your line manager

If your office is in a Phase 4 non-essential office building, please submit a request via the UofG Helpdesk.  These requests will initially be reviewed and assessed by a contact in your local area. Once approved, Estates aim to turn around access arrangements. 

Phase 4 buildings are detailed in the Access Protocol

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How do I carry out essential building and equipment checks in university buildings?

Please refer to the building inspection and access information for details on how to carry out essential building and equipment checks.

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What should I do if I have symptoms that could be Covid-19?

If you are not already at work:

If you are not at work, DO NOT come to work. Contact your line manager and let them know you have symptoms. You must arrange to be tested as soon as possible.

If you are already at work:

If you start to feel unwell with symptoms whilst at work, keep 2m distance from anyone else, inform your line manager immediately and follow their instructions and arrangements to isolate you from others until arrangements can be made for you to go home or, if you are very unwell, to hospital. If you go home, you must arrange to be tested as soon as possible.

How do I arrange to be tested for Covid-19 if I am symptomatic?

If you have symptoms, this NHS website will help you access a test:

If I test positive for Covid-19, how long must I stay off work?

If you test positive, you must isolate for at least 10 days and cannot return to the workplace until you have been fever-free for at least 48 hours. If you are well enough, and able to work remotely, you may do so.

You must keep your line manager informed of any test results, isolation requirements and your health status (as normal for sickness absence).

If I test negative for Covid-19, when can I return to the workplace?

You should notify your line manager as soon as you get your test result and may return to the workplace as soon as you feel well enough.

If I have tested positive, do I need to nofity the University of any close contacts I have had recently at the University?

No, the Test and Protect team will contact you to establish this information and will then contact and advise your close contacts directly to advise them to self-isolate for 14 days.

What do I need to do if I am contacted by the Test & Protect Team and informed I am a close contact of a confirmed case?

You should notify your line manager that you are required to self-isolate. If you remain well enough, and are able to work remotely, you may do so for the duration of the isolation period. If you become unwell and are too unwell to continue to work, you should inform your manager that you are unwell and you will be placed on sickness absence in the normal way.

If you test positive for Covid-19 during this period you should notify your line manager. You, or your line manager if you are too unwell to do so, should register your illness on the UoG Helpdesk Covid-19 report tool. This can be found on the UoG Helpdesk front page in the tile entitled Covid-19 Support Articles.

If you remain well but are unable to work remotely because of the nature of your role, you will continue to receive full pay during the isolation period.

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Where can staff access training and support for remote working?

Our Guide for remote working provides support and guidance for staff and students continuing to work remotely over the coming weeks and months.

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Is there advice available for line managers planning a return to campus?

We have published information for line managers planning a return to campus for their staff, to allow local managers to undestand and put in place measures which enable a smooth transition.

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How are we supporting specialist roles?

Our campuses in Glasgow and Dumfries are closed to all non-essential staff, however some specialist roles will still be required on-campus. 

In these exceptional circumstances we are asking staff to discuss with line managers supervisors about supporting priority tasks and taking on new responsibilities outwith normal duties. 

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Will GTA staff and demonstrators be given guidance on online teaching?

Detailed guidance is available, and more is being prepared, to support all staff who are involved in teaching and assessment. You can find this at Glasgow Anywhere. We are planning to offer staff training during the next few days and weeks.   

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Additional FAQ for MVLS staff 

The following FAQs have been developed specifically for MVLS staff:

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Examinations and assessments

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What is Good Cause?

In times of illness or other adverse circumstances, Good Cause is the University’s process for making appropriate allowance for assessments or exams, such as waiving a late penalty, granting extensions, or allowing a resit. Good Cause claims are submitted via MyCampus. Please view the Good Cause FAQs for more information.

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Why are the Exams not being delayed or cancelled?

We weighed very carefully the possibility of a delay to the exams against when we may  see peaks in Coronavirus and other factors such as the remaining academic timetable, the no detriment position that is being adopted, the associated changes to good cause and the requirements for some graduating students to take up postgraduate study offers or job offers.  Overall, the decision taken to hold the dates as they were was not taken lightly and the conclusion was that this approach was in the best interest of everyone.

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What is the 'no detriment' approach?

There is full information and guidance on our no detriment policy published on the Senate Office webpages

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Where can I find the no detriment policy and other assessment policy information?

Relevant assessment policy information is published on the Senate Office webpages.

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I am entering the final year of my undergraduate degree (or fourth year of an Integrated Masters), how does the No Detriment Policy apply to me?

The information below applies to students who are entering their fourth year of an Honours degree (often called Senior Honours) or the fourth/fifth year of an Integrated Masters degree in 2020-21.

 

The No Detriment Policy is designed to ensure that there is no negative impact on your degree outcome from assessments taken between 15 March – 11 September 2020 because of the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

The principles of the No Detriment Policy will be applied to assessments from this period (15 March – 11 September 2020) when calculating your degree award. In brief, assessments you have undertaken during this period will be compared to your average grades outwith it, both before and after the pandemic period. Then, in order to ensure that your results from this period do not lower your overall result, we will – as far as possible – disregard grades which are below that average. Note that, in terms of the No Detriment period, we will only be looking at individual assessment grades (which you will have received from your School) and not your overall course grades.

The details of these precise calculations will be finalised in the coming academic session. The University is committed to the value of your qualification now and in the future, and so we will be taking the time over the coming months to ensure that these calculations are carried out in your best interest.

It is therefore in your interest to continue to focus on the coming 2020-21 academic session, as the baseline to which your No Detriment period grades will be compared will include all your results from this coming year. The University will be in touch with more details as soon as they are ready.

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When will I get more information about my exams?

The University is working hard to prepare detailed guidance to support you with doing assessment online. The timetable for these assessments has been published and available online here.


There are four types of assessment described within the diet: 

  • The majority take the form of 24-hour open online exams/assessments; in this case, you may complete the exam at any time during the scheduled 24 hour period, although we would not expect you to spend more time in total on the exam than is indicated in the guidance that will accompany your exam information.
  • Some of you will be taking timed online exams/assessments, in which case your school will supply more information.  If you are taking such an exam, the time available will include time for downloading the questions and uploading your answers.  (The total time available will be double the time you should take to complete the exam itself.)
  • In a small number of cases, your school may set an alternative assessment, and
  • In a small number of cases, we have decided to postpone an exam or assessment altogether.

 Your school will be in contact by email as soon as possible to provide you with more details about any timed exams, alternative and postponed assessments.  

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What do I do if I have exams that overlap one 24-hour period?  

The overall number of exams and joint degree combinations means that it is not possible to schedule the timetable differently. We have mostly retained the original exam timetable and so the timings comply with the University’s exam scheduling policy.  Remember that the 24-hour online assessment period takes account of the fact that students are studying in different time zones, may have IT issues, have caring responsibilities or disabilities that mean a bigger time allowance would be helpful.  The intention is that you spend no more time on the exam than you would do, if it was being held on campus. For example, if it was due to be a 90 minute face-to-face exam we still expect you to take no more than 90 minutes to complete your answers.  These are not 24-hour long exams, just 24-hour windows in which you can submit your answers. Staying awake for 24 hours and focusing entirely on one paper will not produce your best work. Preparing as best you can in the run up to the exams and doing the best you can in the normal timing of the exam is what we expect of you.

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How long should my exam answer be and what about referencing?

Our expectations are that these exams will be completed as far as possible in the originally allocated times. With this in mind, we do not expect a full reference list at the end of the answer we just expect in-text citations to evidence your arguments as you would in a normal exam.  Similarly, our expectations around word count are consistent with what we would generally expect in the normal exam time.  In collaboration with other universities we have agreed that this would normally be around 1,500 words per hour of the original examination time although this will vary depending on the exam so this is just an approximate guide. A penalty will not be imposed for going above or below this word count.  Remember the questions on these papers have been set so that high quality answers are achievable within the original times for what would have been hand-written exams.

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What happens if I have IT issues?  

We know that most students have access to IT that allows them to do the exams.  However, some may not, and so the University has made additional funds available to support students through these assessments. You can apply for a grant to help you if you need to purchase any additional hardware for completing and uploading your assessment. The process is relatively simple, and we recommend that you consider making an application if you feel it would help. https://www.gla.ac.uk/myglasgow/registry/finance/funds/

There are also still a small number of laptops available for loan to those in Glasgow. However even with this additional funding and support, things can happen on the day.  The main advice is that if it does, don’t panic!  We have a variety of solutions. The University will have a 24-hour support system in place throughout the exam period. If you can access the exam questions, and write your answers, we will find a way of getting that submission from you and will shortly set out guidance on how to get in contact at any time during the exam period.

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Am I allowed to use online resources? Will I be disadvantaged if I have poor internet and can’t search resources?

You are not expected to use online resources, or to spend time undertaking literature searches.  You should answer the question as much as possible in the style you would in a ‘normal’ exam.  A pitfall in open book examinations is to expect answers to come directly from page X of the textbook, slide Y of the notes, or from Google. Whilst we cannot stop you using online resources, you will find that they are not a panacea. Your own critical abilities will serve you better as you should be drawing on your own learning throughout the course!  The revision you are able to do without access to the question should best prepare you to do well in the exam.

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I’ve never used Moodle for exams or assessment before – how will this work?

You are all familiar with using Moodle in some way already and so it is not entirely new, but not all of you have used the online submission process for assessments.  Guidance about Moodle use in assessments will follow soon. There will also be a test site where you can practise downloading a paper and uploading your answers.

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What about my dissertation/project?

Your dissertation or project work should be submitted as planned unless your School has informed you that the submission dates have been revised. The only change is that all submissions will now have to be online. Your School will be able to give you guidance on how to do this. If you think that you will need an extension you should contact your course convener or adviser of studies as soon as possible.

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Will changes to exams and assessments affect the accreditation of my degree?

We have been working very closely with our all of our professional and accrediting bodies to ensure that your degree receives the same professional accreditation as it would in normal circumstances. For those of you who still have one or two years of study to complete before you finish your programme, your School is already planning how to fill any gaps in the demonstration of required competences. This also applies to Y1 and Y2 students.

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How can I be confident that my results will be fair compared to other students with a 24-hour window exam? I suspect that they may cheat.

Firstly, please understand that the only sure way to do well in an exam, whether online or in an exam hall, is by knowing the material well, experiencing the rigour of revision, and demonstrating your own understanding in your answers to the question.  Any of your colleagues who plan on cheating may find that the internet, or offers of outside assistance, are liable to fail them unexpectedly. The University is reserving the right to carry out vivas (oral examinations of students), which can help ensure that submitted material is the student's own work, and that the student has an understanding of what they have written.  The University may also check work using originality checking software. Students will declare the originality of their work before each exam, and a false declaration will not just affect an individual course, but could put a student's whole degree at grave risk. 

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What will the University do to support students who are parents or carers, but who also have to take exams at a time when the schools are closed?

 We decided to hold assessments because we thought, on balance, it would be of benefit to students and it is certainly our intention that no student should be disadvantaged by their performance.  We do understand that in the current circumstances it will be difficult for many students to take these exams at home and, in particular, those with young children.  Our no detriment stance will enable us to set aside your performance in these examinations if you are unable to take them.  

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Will adjustments be made for students with a disability? 

Our expectation is that the original time allowance for the exam, plus the extra time that you would have been allowed in the exam hall, is easily accommodated within the 24-hour examination window.   As such, no further time will be added to the 24-hour window.  If you have a timed exam, the time allocated for that exam is already double the time of the original paper, so if you were due to get 30 minutes extra, this is already accommodated within the doubling of the time. Disability Service are liaising with schools to ensure that student’s needs are met. If you have any questions about exam adjustments or are anxious, please do contact your disability advisor directly and they will be happy to talk things through with you and hopefully put your mind at ease.

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I am a continuing undergraduate student, what should I think about before deciding whether to retake any assessment from the COVID-19 period? 

If you are continuing with your degree in the next academic year (for example you are in year three of a four-year Honours degree) then you will have the option to resit over the summer any assessment you choose (such as essays or exams) which was submitted or taken during the COVID-19 period. 

 There are many factors which may influence your decision about taking this additional assessment this summer. We know that the decision can be a difficult one to make, and that the uncertainty of the recent COVID-19 pandemic period has been stressful. 

Before making the decision about what assessment you wish to resit, if any, there are a number of factors we recommend you keep in mind. We outline the most important of these below. 

  • Impact on your final GPA, if any. Your primary consideration should be the impact that any reassessments will have on your final GPA calculation, which is used to award your degree classification. You can find out more about your GPA calculation in 2020 here. A significant impact on your final GPA, and degree classification, might signal a justification for taking resits of essays or exams. However, you should carefully consider the weighting of your assessments and how much they contribute to your GPAFor most students, the GPA is made up primarily of assessments from outwith the COVID-19 period. Your GPA is also made up of many different components which are relatively small in the context of your full degree. 

So, for example, in a 240-credit Honours degree, an exam worth 50% of a 20-credit course represents 4.1% of your final degree classification. A change in that exam’s grade of two grade points (on the 22-point marking scale) – such as a resit taking an original grade of C1 to a B2 – would only increase the final GPA by 0.083, so that a GPA of 15.3 would become 15.4. Depending on your GPA, to change your degree classification you may therefore have to resit and do better in a very large amount of assessment, or your GPA will have to be very close to the higher degree classification. For many students, even resitting all exams and essays etc from the COVID-19 period may not be enough to change their final degree classification. However, for some who are very close to a higher classification it may make sense to voluntarily resit some assessment. You should therefore look carefully at your GPA and the assessments you are considering resitting to see how much of a likely impact any resits will have. 

  • Time needed to prepare and undertake reassessment. A commitment to retaking assessment will require you to dedicate time over the summer months to studying, preparing for, and undertaking assessment. Consider carefully the impact this will have on your time over the summer months, and think about whether the time allocated to this extra work will benefit your final GPA and your plans after graduation.  
  • Wellbeing and studying through COVID-19. We appreciate that working, studying, and sitting assessments throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge for everyone involved. Our No Detriment Policy, and our work on online learning and assessment, have been designed to minimise where possible any impact on you. Nonetheless, you should consider the need for rest and recovery over the summer. So, when considering whether to resit any assessment, keep in mind the potential impact further study, preparation, and assessment may have on your wellbeing over the summer. If you want to discuss further your approaches to studying, remember that the Advisers in LEADS can provide guidance. 

We strongly recommend that you consider all the factors above before making any decisions about undertaking reassessment. Keep in mind that your Adviser of Studies/Advising Team or relevant Honours/Year Convenor will be able to discuss your options with you, and you can contact them if you have any further questions. 

 You may also wish to consult our FAQs on online examinations and our guides to the No Detriment Policy and how we calculate your degree outcomes.

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I am a PGT student (including Masters degrees), what should I think about before deciding whether to retake any assessment from the COVID-19 period?

If you are a PGT/Masters student in 2019-20 then you will have the option to resit over the summer any assessment you choose (such as essays or exams) which was submitted or taken during the COVID-19 period. 

There are many factors which may influence your decision about taking this additional assessment this summer. We know that the decision can be a difficult one to make, and that the uncertainty of the recent COVID-19 pandemic period has been stressful. 

Before making the decision about what assessment you wish to resit, if any, there are a number of factors we recommend you keep in mind. We outline the most important of these below. 

  • Impact on your final GPA, if any. Your primary consideration should be the impact that any reassessments will have on your final GPA calculation, which is used to award your degree classification. You can find out more about your GPA calculation in 2020 here. A significant impact on your final GPA, and degree classification, might signal a justification for taking reassessments. However, you should carefully consider the weighting of those assessments and how much they contribute to your GPA. 
  • For most students, the GPA is made up primarily of assessments from outwith the COVID-19 period. Your GPA is also made up of many different components which are relatively small in the context of your full degree. So, for example, in a 240-credit Honours degree, an exam worth 50% of a 20-credit course represents 4.1% of your final degree classification. A change in that exam’s grade of two grade points (on the 22-point marking scale) – such as a resit taking an original grade of C1 to a B2 – would only increase the final GPA by 0.083, so that a GPA of 15.3 would become 15.4. Depending on your GPA, to change your degree classification you may therefore have to resit and do better in a very large amount of assessment, or your GPA will have to be very close to the higher degree classification. For many students, even resitting everything in the COVID-19 period may not be enough to change their final degree classification. However, for some who are very close to a higher classification it may make sense to voluntarily resit some assessment. 
  • The No Detriment policy also ‘sets aside’ assessment which is below your 15 March Baseline GPA (see this link for more details). Note that if your resit grade is above your Baseline GPA but below your overall taught GPA after the April/May assessment diet is complete, then a resit result may reduce your final taught GPA. For example, if a student’s Baseline GPA was 15.2, then only grades from the COVID-19 period which were at or above that Baseline GPA will be included in their final taught GPA, so an exam result of C1 during April/May 2020 would be disregarded for the purposes of the final taught GPA. Taking into account only assessment above their Baseline GPA, this student achieves an overall taught GPA of B1 (17.0) after all assessment is complete from the April/May period. If this student were then to resit the exam in which they had a C1 and gain a resit grade of B2, then that B2 is higher than their baseline GPA so would now be included in their taught GPA. But note that even though this B2 is higher than their baseline, it is lower than their previous taught GPA of B1, and so when this taught GPA is recalculated after the resits it will be reduced by the inclusion of the new grade. The resit therefore gave the student a higher grade than the original assessment, but in this situation doing so has lowered the student’s final GPA. 

You should therefore look carefully at your GPA and the assessments you are considering resitting to see how much of a likely impact any resits will have. 

  • Time needed to prepare and undertake reassessment. A commitment to retaking assessment will require you to dedicate time over the summer months to studying, preparing for, and undertaking assessment. Consider carefully the impact this will have on your time over the summer months, and think about whether the time allocated to this extra work will benefit your final GPA and your plans after graduation.  
  • Dissertation work. In particular, any time you spend on reassessment will take away from the time available to work on your Masters dissertation. The dissertation is a large and essential part of a Masters degree and you should make sure to allocate time to properly focus on it. You should therefore consider if the time you will spend preparing for and undertaking reassessment is on balance better spent on your dissertation work. 
  • Delay in graduation for PGCert or PGDip students. If you are a postgraduate student on a PGCert or PGDip programme and expect to graduate after the June boards, then should you opt to resit your assessment you will not be able to graduate in the summer months and so you will not receive your award until the December 2020 graduation period. You should therefore consider if the delay in receiving your Diploma or Certificate will impact on any potential post-graduation employment, study, or internship opportunities.  
  • Wellbeing and studying through COVID-19. We appreciate that working, studying, and sitting assessments throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge for everyone involved. Our No Detriment Policy, and our work on online learning and assessment, have been designed to minimise where possible any impact on you. Nonetheless, you should consider the need for rest and recovery over the summer. So, when considering whether to resit any assessment, keep in mind the potential impact further study, preparation, and assessment may have on your wellbeing over the summer. If you want to discuss further your approaches to studying, remember that the Advisers in LEADS [www.gla.ac.uk/LEADS/students] can provide guidance. 

We strongly recommend that you consider all the factors above before making any decisions about undertaking reassessment. Keep in mind that your Adviser of Studies/Advising Team or relevant Programme Convenor will be able to discuss your options with you, and you can contact them if you have any further questions. 

You may also wish to consult our FAQs on online examinations and our guides to the No Detriment Policy and how we calculate your degree outcomes. 

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I am a graduating undergraduate student (including Honours degrees), what should I think about before deciding whether to resit all my exam assessment from the COVID-19 period? 

If you are due to graduate this year with an undergraduate Honours or Integrated Masters degree, the No Detriment Policy and the University’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic allows you to determine whether to decline your degree classification and resit your examinations from the COVID-19 period. Remember if you decline your final GPA calculation you must resit all of your examinations from the COVID-19 period (that is, all exams from April or May this year); you cannot resit only some exams. 

 There are many factors which may influence your decision about retaking all these exams over this summer. We know that the decision can be a difficult one to make, and that the uncertainty of the recent COVID-19 pandemic period has been stressful. Before making your final decision there are a number of factors we recommend you keep in mind. We outline the most important of these below. 

  • All-or-nothing. The most important thing to note if you are a student who is considering declining your offer of an award is that your exam resits as a graduating student are for the entire 2020 April/May exam diet. You cannot pick the exams you wish to be reassessed in; by opting to take the entire exam diet again, you are declaring that you should not have taken your original 2020 exams at all owing to medical or other circumstances. You will therefore need to take the full exam diet again in August, and we will award you a degree based on whichever is better of the full April/May exam diet or the full August exam diet – we will not choose individual exam results to selectively improve your result. This is our mechanism for fairly dealing with students who, on reflection, should not have sat their exams in April/May 2020 owing to illness or other circumstances. If this applies to you, then you would sit exams in the resit diet alongside those students who did no exams at all during April/May 2020. It will likely not be in your best interest to take this exam diet if you are not in this position. 
  • Impact on your final GPA, if any. Your primary consideration should be the impact that any reassessments will have on your final GPA calculation, which is used to award your degree classification. You can find out more about your GPA calculation in 2020 here. A significant impact on your final GPA, and degree classification, might signal a justification for taking reassessments. However, you should carefully consider the weighting of those assessments and how much they contribute to your GPA. For most students, the GPA is made up primarily of assessments from outwith the COVID-19 period. Your GPA is also made up of many different components which are relatively small in the context of your full degree. So, for example, in a 240-credit Honours degree, an exam worth 50% of a 20-credit course represents 4.1% of your final degree classification. A change in that exam’s grade of two grade points (on the 22-point marking scale) – such as a resit taking an original grade of C1 to a B2 – would only increase the final GPA by 0.083, so that a GPA of 15.3 would become 15.4. Depending on your GPA, to change your degree classification you may therefore have to do better in a very large amount of assessment, or your GPA will have to be very close to the higher degree classification. For many students, resitting all exams in the COVID-19 period may not be enough to change their final degree classification. You should therefore look carefully at your GPA and the assessments you are considering resitting to see how much of a likely impact any resits will have. 
  • Time needed to prepare and undertake reassessment. A commitment to retaking all your April/May exams will require you to dedicate time over the summer months to studying, preparing for, and undertaking these exams again. Consider carefully the impact this will have on your time over the summer months, and think about whether the time allocated to this extra work will benefit your final GPA and your plans after graduation.  
  • Delay in graduation. Students who accept their degree classification will receive a copy of their graduation certificate and HEAR/transcript by post sometime in July or August. If you opt to resit your examinations, you will not be able to graduate in the summer months and so you will not receive your degree until the December 2020 graduation period. You should therefore consider if the delay in receiving your degree will impact on any potential post-graduation employment, study, or internship opportunities. 
  • Wellbeing and studying through COVID-19. We appreciate that working, studying, and sitting assessments throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge for everyone involved. Our No Detriment Policy, and our work on online learning and assessment, have been designed to minimise where possible any impact on you. Nonetheless, you should consider the need for rest and recovery over the summer as you prepare for your future plans. So, when considering whether to resit your exams, keep in mind the potential impact further study, preparation, and assessment may have on your wellbeing over the summer. If you want to discuss further your approaches to studying, remember that the Advisers in LEADS can provide guidance. 

 We strongly recommend that you consider all the factors above before making any decisions about resitting your whole April/May exam diet. Keep in mind that your Adviser of Studies/Advising Team or relevant Honours/Year Convenor will be able to discuss your options with you, and you can contact them if you have any further questions. 

 You may also wish to consult our FAQs on online examinations and our guides to the No Detriment Policy and how we calculate your degree outcomes here.

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How do course grades work under the No Detriment policy? 

We have modified the award of course grades in light of our No Detriment policy. Where possible we want your academic performance reflected in your course grade, but at the same time we need to be fair in recognising that not all assessment has been possible (especially for first and second years) and that your performance in assessments during the Covid period may have been impacted. 

The following approach applies to course grades where any course assessment (including level 1 and 2 reassessment) was scheduled after 15 March 2020*. 

Where enough assessment for the course has been completed to award a detailed grade (at least 65%): 

  • a letter grade (e.g. A4, B2, C1) will be awarded if it is above the threshold grade (normally D3 for undergraduate students and C3 for postgraduate students) 
  • however, if your course grade is below the threshold grade (normally D3 for undergraduate students and C3 for postgraduate students) CA grade will be awarded in recognition that your performance may have been affected during the pandemic. 

Where less than 65% of the course assessment is completed: 

All students will receive the CA Grade. This is because we cannot make a fair judgement on course performance where less than 65% of assessment has been completed.To protect the reputation of your degree, we do not award grades without clear evidence making up at least 65% of the assessment required.  

In either situation, the award of CA for a course indicates that you have taken the course and been awarded credit for it, but also means that the assessment for that course was disrupted during the period of the Covid-19 pandemic. Your transcript will include a statement to that effect, so that it is clear to anyone reading that CA does not indicate a poor performance. 

The grades of MV and CW will continue to be used in some cases, if some assessment scheduled prior to 15 March is incomplete. 

The full No Detriment policy page has detailed information on course grades as well as all other No Detriment matters We appreciate that this is complex information and you may wish to seek further explanation of your course grade results from your School via gla.ac.uk/help or your Adviser of Study. 

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What if I am unhappy with any of my course grades from the COVID-19 period? 

As explained in the Question: How do course grades work under the No Detriment policy? We have modified our approach to awarding course grades during the COVID-19 period. 

Where any course assessment was scheduled for the period of the No Detriment policy, standard course grades will be awarded if the threshold grade has been reached (normally D3 for undergraduate students and C3 for postgraduate students). If not, the grade will be CA. 

We realise that in some exceptional cases you may feel that your actual grade does not give an accurate reflection of your performance. This might be because a large element of your assessment took place at a point when there was significant disruption caused by the pandemic. 

You may therefore request that letter grade be changed to CA on your transcript. See the question on how course grades work under the No Detriment policy for more details on what CA means. Remember that this will not affect the calculation of your degree, only how individual course results appear on your transcript. 

 If so, please contact your School. But remember, we believe in most cases it will be better to have an academic grade and the following applies: 

  • Your grade can only be changed to CA if some of your course assessment was scheduled after 15 March 2020. If your course grade has been calculated from assessments taken before the period of the pandemic, then it cannot be changed to CA.; 
  • If you have a letter grade it will by definition be above the threshold grade for your degree, so it cannot be a failing or poor grade. 
  • Once a grade has been altered to CA it cannot be reversed after graduation. In some situations – such as entry to postgraduate degrees, especially outside of the United Kingdom – a non-letter grade may be less helpful for you than a letter grade. It is generally better for you to have as much evidence as possible on your transcript rather than remove any grades. 

 

  • Your overall degree result (eg a First, 2.1, Merit, Distinction, etc) will not be based on course grades but instead on your assessment components in line with the No Detriment policy (for more details, see here for Honours students and here for Masters students), so changing your course grade will have no effect whatsoever on your final degree outcome. Also, references from your lecturers will also be based on your GPA and your individual assessment results and so changing a course grade will not be of benefit to you for references. 
  • We therefore would advise you that you should only consider changing a course grade if you are certain it would give the wrong impression of your ability to a reader of your transcript and if you are also sure there are no circumstances where you would be better having a letter grade. In our experience, this will be advisable only in rare situations. 

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I am a continuing undergraduate student, why does the Enrol for Resits tab in my MyCampus Student Centre show me as enrolled for resits for L1 and L2 courses that I took in semester one when there are no reassessment opportunities for these courses under the No Detriment Policy?

Under the No Detriment Policy there are no reassessment opportunities for Level 1 and Level 2 courses where no assessment was scheduled to have taken place after 15 March 2020.  However, where the first diet course result was MV, CW or the overall course grade was below E1 or below a second diet, or resit, course result of CA must be entered into MyCampus.  This means that the exam will appear in the Enrol for Resits tab in your MyCampus Student Centre, even though there is no resit exam for these courses.

There some courses for programmes of study in the School of Law, Accounting and Finance, and the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing where L1 and L2 resit exams are required for professional accreditation.   Exams for these courses are listed in the resit timetable.

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Advice for researchers

Funding, award, support and REF2021 information:

Returning to campus, including restarting some research activities whilst ensuring safety and wellbeing:

Travel advice: students and staff

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I am arriving in Glasgow from elsewhere, do I need to quarantine?

If you are arriving in Glasgow from a country with which Scotland does not have a travel corridor arrangement or other exemptions in place, you will be asked to quarantine for 14 days after arrival. There are full details on which countries these restrictions apply to on the Scottish Government’s website.

This applies to people travelling from a country of permanent residence and those returning from holiday. It also applies to people who have transited via a non-exempt country.

An initial supply of food will be supplied to people undergoing self-isolation on their arrival in a University residence. If you have any further questions or concerns, please do refer to the 'UofGLiving' webpages or social channels on FacebookInstagram or Twitter as answers to many queries can be found there. Over and above that if you can’t find an answer then please don’t hesitate to get in touch at accom@gla.ac.uk and we will respond to you as soon as possible.  

Any student and staff member who is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 should follow the guidance on the NHS Inform website.

If you are returning to Glasgow from a part of the UK which is currently under local lockdown restrictions, or where testing is being offered locally for people who do not have symptoms as part of the public health response arrangements, you will be required to quarantine for 14 days following your arrival in Glasgow.

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What is the University's position on travel?

The University is working on the principle that any business travel from the University will only be able to proceed if all the factors below are addressed:  

1. The UK Government still advises British nationals against all but essential travel (see UK Government's travel advice) except to certain exempted countries –travel to these countries can proceed at this time subject to the procedures below.

If there is UK Government advice against non-essential travel to a country, specific higher-level authorisation MUST be obtained for each individual trip in addition to the procedures below. This authorisation should normally be sought from Head of College/ Chief Operating Officer level and will only be granted if the trip is for essential business purposes. (Travel for Covid-related research may fall within this category.) 

2. The Scottish and UK Government Public Health guidance must permit such travel to recommence  

3. The fieldwork must be agreed with the research Supervisor and Head of School/ Director of Institute/ Service to be essential 

4. An Oversea Travel Risk Assessment must be completed. See template and guidance on completing the risk assessmentThe risk assessment must be agreed and signed off by both line manager/ supervisor and Head of School/ Director of Institute/ Service. 

5. The Covid-19 Overseas Travel Risk Assessment supplement must also be completed. The risk assessment must be agreed and signed off by both line manager/ supervisor and Head of School/ Director of Institute/ Service. 

6. In-country Government guidance around health and safety must be observed 

7. An appropriate standard of health and safety must be ensured for accommodation and during group and private transportation. This will include any required physical distancing measures and hygiene and cleaning processes. 

8. The borders/ government of host country(ies) (UK or International) must be open to/permit travel of this nature at the planned arrival date. 

9. Any partner institute supporting or hosting activities must allow such visits by the proposed start date 

10. Any host organisation must outline contingency plans in the event of a possible further outbreak 

11. Consideration must be given to the impact on the host country and local area, particularly rural communities, of the activity and associated risk of virus transmission to the community; organisers must ensure that there is no adverse reputational risk associated with carrying out the work. 

12. There is sufficient cover in place to manage financial and health risks effectively through insurance or other contingency funding. See the University's travel insurance policy in relation to coronavirus

Travel Authorisation 

Authorisation for travel is via the local line-management process, not through Health, Safety and Wellbeing services, but guidance and advice around specific risk assessments is available on the SEPS website above or by contacting SEPS via safety@glasgow.ac.uk 

Additional Support  

Traveline Scotland has set up a new telephone hotline and webpage to provide information on available travel routes back to Scotland, should it be required:   

  • Hotline: +44(0)141 465 1878 
  • Traveline Scotland: Returning to Scotland from abroad

Criteria for UK Fieldwork and Related Activities

The University recognises the need to enable departments who must conduct fieldwork as part of their core activities to do so, and aims to allow some resumption of fieldwork, so far as it is safe to do so. This should be done by following a risk-based approach underpinned by any Government guidance or legal requirements that may be in force.

When considering whether fieldwork can safely be undertaken, the health, safety and wellbeing of those involved should always be the key priority. This includes the safety of those undertaking the work and those in the wider community who may be affected by it.

The nature of fieldwork varies massively between Colleges/Schools/Institutes and Services and each activity that is proposed MUST be risk assessed by the unit proposing the work to help decide whether it can safely be undertaken.

In general, authorisation for UK field activities can be granted at Head of School/Service or Director of Institute level. However, when considering whether to authorise proposals that may be identified as higher risk, those in such management roles should consider whether there is a need to discuss these further at higher level, or to consult with staff elsewhere in the University. (e.g. on ethics processes, safety advice, reputational risk, insurance risks etc.)

Some basic principles to be followed in making these judgements are provided below.

  • There must be no Scottish or UK Government legal restriction that prevents the activities being planned.
  • There must be no Scottish or UK Government guidance in force that would be contravened by the activities planned.
  • There must be no University of Glasgow prohibition on the travel, or of the activities planned.
  • The fieldwork must have been agreed with the research supervisor/project lead and Head of School/ Director of Institute to be an essential element of a research project, or of the core work of the department.
  • The fieldwork must have been agreed as being unable to reasonably be delayed until later stages of the Covid recovery phases without significant adverse impact.
  • The activities must not be likely to adversely impact the wellbeing of the community/area being visited nor result in a risk of reputational damage to the University.
  • A fieldwork risk assessment must have been completed and signed off by the Supervisor and Head of School/ Director of Institute. (The SEPS fieldwork risk assessment template can be used for this although, in recognition of the diverse nature of fieldwork across the University, this does not preclude other assessment processes and documents being used where these are more appropriate.)
  • Where the field activities involve practical work that cannot be fully assessed and recorded within the fieldwork risk assessment template, a separate general risk assessment(s) of the work must have been prepared.
  • Any advisory and mandatory Scottish or UK Government guidance around health and safety, including physical distancing measures, must be able to be fully observed. Evidence of how this will be achieved should be provided within the risk assessment(s) or in other work plans referenced within the assessment.
  • Where there is to be use of shared/group transport, or there is an overnight stay, the risk assessment must explain how any Government recommendations on distancing and hygiene will be achieved. (Use of shared accommodation may not be acceptable in the early recovery phases.)
  • All partner organisations or other participants in the fieldwork must agree to comply with measure in place. It is recommended that risk assessments be shared and a simple written agreement (e.g. email) obtained regarding compliance.
  • Contingency plans must be in place to deal with any Covid case that may occur during fieldwork group trips.

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I’m worried my immigration status might be affected by travel restrictions

If you are a student or member of staff affected by coronavirus and you have concerns about your immigration status, please contact immigrationcompliance@glasgow.ac.uk

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Is there any advice for Tier 4 Visa Students?

We have taken the decision to suspend face-to-face teaching and therefore, if you would like to return home, and there are no travel restrictions in place for your destination, you can do so. Please respect the quarantining arrangements of your home country, to minimise the risk of transmission

You will not be penalised academically and the University will maintain sponsorship of your Tier 4 visa, providing you continue to engage in your studies whilst you are away. This means your visa will remain valid and you will be able to use it to return to Glasgow at a later date.

I am a PGT student, if I go home now, should I return for my dissertation/project at a later date or can I submit it from my home country?

We hope you will be able to return to Glasgow later in the year to complete your dissertation/project if you wish. Alternatively, you may complete and submit your dissertation/project from your home country. In both cases, your visa will remain valid.

I am a PGT student, do I still need to attend the June 2020 Tier 4 Check-in in person?

No, this check-in will not take place. We will write to you with details of our alternative monitoring arrangements in due course.

I am a continuing undergraduate student and will need to return for further years’ study, can I still go home to take my exams remotely?

Yes, you can still go home and take any necessary assessments. Undergraduate students are not usually required to attend during summer. You will be able to return on your current visa to continue your studies next academic year.

I am an International PGR student, can I do my research remotely?

You should speak to your supervisor about your project. If you can do your project with remote supervision, then you can continue to engage with your supervisor while you are away. Your Graduate School can advise you on the procedures for Research Furth.

My visa will expire soon and I am concerned I may not be able to leave the UK due to travel restrictions.

Please contact the International Student Support Team for advice.

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I am planning to go abroad for study/ work placement in 2020/21, what should I do? 

After careful consideration, the University will allow study exchange and work placement in 2020/21 when it is safe and possible to do so. Our highest priority in determining whether your opportunity can go ahead is your health, safety and wellbeing. 

Travel from the UK to international destinations will only be able to proceed if all 6 factors below are addressed:  

  • The Foreign & Commonwealth Office (FCO) must lift the Exceptional Travel Advisory Notices. UofG exceptions apply to European destinations.** 
  • University of Glasgow must lift travel restrictions which apply to staff and students. 
  • The Scottish and/or UK Government must have authorised such travel to recommence. 
  • The borders of host countries must be open at the student’s planned arrival date. 
  • The partner institute or placement provider must allow physical placement by the semester or employment start date. Students will be expected to attend their placement in person from the start, and it is acknowledged that a proportion of the learning may take place virtually or in the case of work placement on a ‘work from home’ basis. 
  • There is sufficient cover in place to manage financial and health risk effectively through insurance or other contingency funding. 

**travel to Europe for Go Abroad programmes is permitted as ‘essential travel’ and therefore students can travel to European destinations where FCO advises ‘against all but essential travel’. This is based on risk assessment. This is under review and is subject to change. 

Semester 1 and full year abroad placements 

If you are travelling for semester 1 or a full year, you will have been notified about the status of your placement by the Go Abroad Team goabroad@glasgow.ac.uk 

Semester 2 placements 

Review dates for semester 2 have been set and take into account in-country term start dates and factor in time to make travel and visa arrangements:  

  • Study Exchange non-European destinations – 21 October 2020 
  • Study Exchange European Destinations – 11 November 2020 
  • SMLC assistantships and work placement – 27 January 2021 

You will be notified by the Go Abroad Team if travel is possible following these dates. 

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What happens if my study/ work placement is suspended?

Your study or work placement will be suspended if:  

  • Your partner university or placement provider were unable to offer opportunities in 2020/21. 
  • The criteria in the above section cannot be met by the review date for your placement which have been set to factor in in-country term start dates and time to make travel and visa arrangements. 

We will be in touch with you if your opportunity is impacted. 

Alternative options may be available to you. Please contact the Go Abroad Team goabroad@glasgow.ac.uk for advice. 

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I am a study abroad student currently on exchange in Glasgow, what should I do?

The University has taken the decision to suspend teaching and we are making arrangements for alternative assessments to replace the April/May examinations. In view of this, if you would like to return home, you should do so. Please respect the quarantining arrangements of your home country, to minimise the risk of transmission.

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I was studying/working abroad and returned home. Is there help with the extra costs I incurred?

If you are an Erasmus student and are now studying or working online, you will continue to receive your Erasmus grant until the end of the semester as planned.  If you have incurred exceptional costs as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, you may be eligible for a grant from our hardship fund; please contact the GoAbroad team to submit a claim (goabroad@glasgow.ac.uk).

If you are not an Erasmus student, the GoAbroad team will contact you regarding any exceptional costs you may have incurred in returning home.

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My visa will expire soon and I am concerned I may not be able to leave the UK due to travel restrictions. 

Please contact the International Student Support Team or view the latest news for further advice.

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If you have any questions or concerns, please check the NHS website or you can email us directly using the contacts provided in the FAQ.

Helpful links