Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

The CPD workshop topics for 2018/19 reflect the University's strategic learning and teaching priorities, and include specific suggestions from University of Glasgow staff.

The series includes 5 strands, which you can read about in detail at the bottom of the page:

Download the LEADS CPD Series Handbook 18-19

Booking is via our Events calendar, where sessions are listed chronologically. Individual Event listings are also linked from the expandable sections below, where contents are orgnanised by strand.

Please note that these CPD workshops are only open to University of Glasgow staff (including Graduate Teaching Assistants / Demonstrators). Colleagues from validated institutions are, however, welcome to attend sessions delivered by invited external speakers.

Invited external speakers

Invited external speakers

Supervising doctoral students’ writing

Supervising doctoral students’ writing

Invited speaker: Prof Rowena Murray

This seminar will explore the idea of using a range of approaches to help postgraduate students develop academic writing skills and strategies, so that they can complete their theses on time and, where appropriate, publish during the doctorate.

We can discuss the pros and cons of different strategies and their potential at different stages.

Supervision (title TBC)

Supervision (title TBC)

Invited speaker: Dr Martyn Kingsbury

Martyn is Director of the Educational Development Unit at Imperial College London; a group of academics and support staff from a variety of different disciplinary backgrounds, the former of whom have experience of teaching and supervision at undergraduate and postgraduate level, with expertise in educational theory and practice.

Scholarship of Teaching & Learning Strand

1: What is the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL), and why should I care?   Fri 5 Oct 2018 1 - 3pm
Prof Moira Fischbacher-Smith / Dr Michael McEwan   Book here

Expertise and excellence in teaching and in SoTL can be a vehicle for developing leadership, esteem, and evidence for academic promotion. This session focuses on developing an understanding of SoTL, introduces the four scholarships of Boyer’s ‘scholarship reconsidered’, and finishes with a framework for SoTL project design. During the session, we’ll present examples of SoTL to give a feel for what constitutes SoTL in Higher Education.

NB: Prof. Fischbacher-Smith has recorded some preliminary advice on academic promotion already. We ask that you watch her short presentation before attending (3 videos, ~25 minutes total):

 
2: Designing data collection and analysis  Thu 1 Nov 2018 12 - 2pm
Dr Michael McEwan   Book here

This session moves from formulating scholarship questions towards deciding how you’ll answer them. What counts as data? What kind of data do you require in order to actually address the issue at hand, and how can you plan your data collection, management and analysis to make sure that’s achievable – especially when the data might be of an unfamiliar form? 

 
3: Preparing to do scholarship, and writing an ethics application  Mon 5 Nov 2018 12 - 2pm
Dr Vicki Dale / Dr Michael McEwan    Book here

Depending on the details of a given scholarship projects, specific ethical approval might need to
be applied for, reviewed and approved before the work can begin. This session will explore ethical considerations for scholarship of learning and teaching, with an emphasis on research into the experience of the learners. We’ll also examine the process of designing an ethically sound methodology. Relevant ethics application forms and associated documentation will be used to give this session a significant practical ‘workshop’ feel. This workshop will appeal to staff preparing to undertake scholarship in any of the four colleges. College-specific documentation will be circulated to allow participants to contextualise their queries in relation to their own college. 

 
4: Methods: designing questionnaires  Thu 8 Nov 2018 12 - 2pm
Dr Vicki Dale   Book here

Questionnaires can notoriously be interpreted in different ways by different respondents, making your analysis of the responses difficult. Good question design can help to eliminate ambiguity and help respondents to provide you with meaningful answers. This workshop will combine theory and practice and will be delivered in three parts: 1) the theory of designing evidence-based questionnaires, 2) practice at developing a questionnaire, 3) feedback and discussion on proposed questionnaire designs, and issues arising.

This workshop will appeal to staff in all four colleges who are interested in undertaking scholarship, particularly around learner experience research. 

 
5: Coding in qualitative research   Wed 14 Nov 2018 1 - 2.30pm
Nicole Kipar   Book here

After collecting responses from human participants in, for example, interviews or open-ended survey questionssurveys, you need to decide how to categorise ing their responses. This session introduces you to coding of text and illustrates a variety of coding techniques in qualitative textual data analysis. It aims to position approaches to coding in the landscape of qualitative research and inquiry, and gives you the opportunity to practice during the workshop with real data. We’ll investigate why coding can be useful, what the benefits are and what pitfalls to be aware ofware, and when you might want to choose coding for your project – and what type of coding technique.

 
6: Approaches: Comparative research (i.e. experiments) and surveys  Thu 15 Nov 2018 1 - 3pm
 Dr Michael McEwan   Book here
This session explores the more positivistic side of educational research, such as interventions, pseudo-experiments comparative studies, as well as touching on larger-scale surveys. With a nod to sequential and concurrent designs, we'll discuss the power and limitations of more quantitative scholarship designs, ensuring that you leave with an understanding beyond what might be your own 'typical' methodology.  
7: Methods: undertaking online research  Tue 20 Nov 2018 12:30 - 2pm
Dr Amanda Pate   Book here
This session focuses on gathering data for research projects through the internet. It covers the use of online surveys, email data collection, the use of virtual documents, and the role that social media can play in your research project. It also highlights issues of data protection when it comes to undertaking research online.  
8: Approaches: ethnography and case studies  Wed 28 Nov 2018 12 - 2pm
 Dr Nathalie Sheridan   Book here

Ethnography is a method of investigation that looks at the situation (in this case, the teaching scenario) from the point of view of the culture and behaviour of the subjects being studied. This session will explore what ethnography is, how it works as a research approach in an educational context, what methods are related to ethnography, and some of the principles of ethnographic research. The session also introduces case studies as a methodology and explores their purpose within research and scholarship in higher education. 

 
9: Methods: carrying out observations  Thu 29 Nov 2018 12 - 2pm
 Dr Nathalie Sheridan   Book here

This session offers an overview of the principles of observation as a research method. We’ll discuss issues around observation bias, interference with the observed, ‘going native’, and the significance of data derived through observation.

 
10: Methods: conducting interviews  Mon 21 Jan 2019 12 - 2pm
 Dr Amanda Pate / Dr Janis Davidson   Book here

In publishing scholarship of teaching and learning, interviews allow you to get deeper responses than surveys, and also to follow up based on initial answers.

This workshop is aimed at anyone undertaking research interviews for the first time. We'll examine aspects such as preparing good interview questions, choosing effective interview environments, having relevant documentation, and approaches to recording interviews.

 
11: Approaches: grounded theory  Wed 6 Feb 2019 1 - 2.30pm
Nicole Kipar   Book here

In contrast to research that starts with a hypothesis, “Grounded Theory is a form of qualitative research developed [...] for the purpose of constructing theory” from the observations upwards (Corbin, 2017).

This session is a brief introduction to the principles of Grounded Theory, and its applicability to educational scholarship. 

 
12: Methods: engaging in self-reflection (reflective logs, autoethnography)  Thu 7 Feb 2019 12 - 2pm
Nicole Kipar / Dr Nathalie Sheridan   Book here
An exploration of some of the ways how a practitioner may research their own practice. The session covers a variety of self-reflective approaches e.g. reflective journals, self-narrative research, and introduces the reflexive method of analytic autoethnography.   
13: Methods: facilitating focus groups  Thu 21 Feb 2019 2 - 4pm
Dr Amanda Pate   Book here
Focus groups let you examine your participants' experience of a teaching situation in more depth than a survey, and with more data sources than a one-on-one interview. This introduction to how and why to use focus groups for data collection covers how to prepare for facilitating them, and includes some of the key issues to consider in focus group design, such as sampling and planning issues, as well as anticipating problems.   

Active Learning Strand

 

(Rescheduled from original date in October)

1: Intro to Active Learning

Mon 3 Dec 2018 12.00 - 13.00
Dr Amanda Pate   Book here

With the campus redevelopment under way, an increasing number of rooms are being built or adapted to give you greater flexibility in your modes of teaching. This session gives an introduction to active learning and examines the concept of Glasgow's learning spaces, both physical and online. It introduces the resources generated through the MALT (Moodle Active Learning and Teaching) LTDF project, which demonstrate how active learning can be used creatively to facilitate face-to-face, blended, and online learning. These resources include material to support co-operative and collaborative approaches to teaching, learning, and also assessment - all underpinned by the values of active learning.

Come if you want to: start thinking about how you might adapt your teaching to the developing range of spaces and technologies we have at Glasgow - even if you only ever teach in lecture theatres or traditional smaller classes

 

(Repeated due to high demand - see below - Mon 30 Jan 2019)

2: Adapting your teaching for Glasgow's new active learning spaces

 Thu 11 Oct 2018 11.15 - 12.45 
Dr Susan Deeley / Dr Joseph Maguire / Dr Vicki Dale     Book here
This hands-on session will introduce participants to the concept of Technology Enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) spaces, and different active learning techniques that can be used in such spaces to promote student collaboration and problem-solving. An expert educator in using TEAL spaces in their own discipline will share their lessons learned and recommendations for practice. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in the TEAL space from the student perspective.        
3: Inclusive practice: proactive approaches to intercultural learning & teaching  Thu 25 Oct 2018  10 - 12noon
Nicole Kipar   Book here

This session aims to raise awareness and challenge participants’ own views and understanding, and explores approaches to providing inclusivity in your practice with a specific focus on interculturality. It investigates the role that implicit bias plays, and discusses the need to respect and engage all learners in the context of teaching and learning practice in Higher Education.

You should come because: making our own cultural context explicit is not only fascinating, but it opens our eyes to the assumptions we make about others, and vice versa.

 
4: Creating supportive spaces: teaching in an inclusive environment  Mon 29 Oct 2018  1 - 3.30pm
Dr El Spaeth   Book here
This session helps you consider how you can teach in a way that is open and accessible to all students. Rather than considering specific policy, we will explore this from a pedagogical perspective, including practical ways that you can make your teaching more inclusive.      

(Rescheduled from original date in October)

1: Intro to Active Learning 

Mon 3 Dec 2018 12.00 - 13.00
Dr Amanda Pate   Book here

With the campus redevelopment under way, an increasing number of rooms are being built or adapted to give you greater flexibility in your modes of teaching. This session gives an introduction to active learning and examines the concept of Glasgow's learning spaces, both physical and online. It introduces the resources generated through the MALT (Moodle Active Learning and Teaching) LTDF project, which demonstrate how active learning can be used creatively to facilitate face-to-face, blended, and online learning. These resources include material to support co-operative and collaborative approaches to teaching, learning, and also assessment - all underpinned by the values of active learning.

Come if you want to: start thinking about how you might adapt your teaching to the developing range of spaces and technologies we have at Glasgow - even if you only ever teach in lecture theatres or traditional smaller classes

 
5: Planning for MOOCS (the course design process)  Mon 14 Jan 2019 12 - 2pm 
John Kerr / Vicki Dale   Book here

In this session, participants will gain a deeper understanding into the important role that MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) play at Glasgow. We'll explore the current direction of MOOCs, focus on the processes of announcing, designing and running a MOOC, and investigate the impact they've had on our face-to-face learners along with how they support our distance programmes. Drawing on examples from all four colleges, this workshop will appeal to teachers and teaching support staff from any discipline.

You should come because: you'll get to ask the University's MOOC Manager about his experience from several years of MOOC publishing across various subjects at Glasgow (or even just find out what MOOCs are!)

 

(Repeated due to high demand)

2: Adapting your teaching for Glasgow's new active learning spaces

Wed 30 Jan 2019 12.00 - 14.00
Dr Susan Deeley / Dr Joseph Maguire / Dr Vicki Dale     Book here
This hands-on session will introduce participants to the concept of Technology Enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) spaces, and different active learning techniques that can be used in such spaces to promote student collaboration and problem-solving. An expert educator in using TEAL spaces in their own discipline will share their lessons learned and recommendations for practice. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in the TEAL space from the student perspective.        
6: Using digital storytelling for teaching, learning and assessment  Tue 05 Feb 2019 12 - 2pm 
Dr Amanda Pate   Book here

Digital storytelling is a tried and trusted approach to delivering teaching online in order that contact time can be used for other purposes. This session introduces digital storytelling as an approach for teaching and learning, where we'll look at the concept and at what makes a good digital story. You'll get an insight into the processes involved (and tips for addressing these), and the tools available to support you to develop digital storytelling for your teaching and with your students.

You should come because: digital storytelling not only frees up contact time, but it's a great way to build the digital literacy of teaching staff or students who put it into practice.

 
7: The dos and don'ts of creating online video  Wed 20 Feb 2019  10 - 12noon
Media & Digital Development Team   Book here

The Media & Digital Development experts in LEADS will take you through the basics of practical videography and explore the best use of software and equipment available for creating your own content. They’ll also give you an introduction on how to prepare and work with our team on developing professional videos 

 
8: Spielberg in the classroom: Incorporating rich media in active learning Wed 27 Feb 2019 12 - 2pm
Media & Digital Development Team   Book here
This session is aimed at participants who planning for blended or online learning, and who wish to devise videos for their teaching. There will be a showcase of a variety of resources from MOOCs and BOLD-sponsored courses.     
9: Problem-based learning: a model for active learning used at Glasgow Thu 28 Feb 2019 12 - 2pm
Dr Genevieve Stapleton / Dr Sharon Sneddon (School of Medicine)   Book here

In this workshop, we’ll explore the use of PBL as a small- group teaching method which promotes self-directed independent learning. This is an interactive and practice- based workshop, providing examples, ideas and tools to support staff who are thinking about developing this type of teaching. Traditionally used in medicine, we’ll consider how this approach can be of benefit to students from a wide variety of disciplines. 

 
10: Establishing a mindful classroom (supporting mental health) Mon 4 Mar 2019 12 - 2pm
Dr El Spaeth / Pamela Orr (Counselling and Psychological Services)   Book here
University can have unexpected impacts on a student's mental health. This session considers how we can teach in a way that is mindful of this.     
11: Using Mahara for online portfolios Tue 12 Mar 2019 1 - 3pm
Craig Brown (School of Law)   Book here

Portofolio assessment is useful in letting students show (and reflect on) their progression through a course, and it provides multiple small opportunities for them to stay engaged as the course goes by. This session introduces the e-portfolio tool Mahara. We’ll look at what the tool offers, why you might want to use it, and examples of how it is being used with students in the School of law. 

 
12: Using Moodle for Designing Flipped Learning  Tue 19 Mar 2019 12 - 2pm
Dr El Spaeth / Dr Amanda Pate   Book here

Flipped classroom teaching means asking students to engage with content (such as videos, articles, activities) before class, meaning that classroom time can be used to explore concepts more collaboratively and dialogically. This session helps you consider how this might be implemented in your own practice.

 

Assessment & Feedback Strand

1: Giving constructive and useful feedback to students  Tue 16 Oct 2018 12-2pm
Dr Amanda Sykes   Book here
This session will use recent discussion and research around feedback to consider not only how to provide useful feedback to students, but how to support them to engage with it as well. Participants will be encouraged to consider how this might best fit within their current practice and what they might need to change.  
2: What can Strictly Come Dancing teach us about assessment & feedback (not to mention The X Factor)? Wed 27 Nov 2018 10-12noon
Dr Matthew Williamson   Book here

The judging on Strictly Come Dancing is probably how the largest cross-section of the public are exposed to what
we would call assessment and feedback. The way marks are awarded, decisions are made and feedback given
can give an insight into how we assess and feedback on student work. We’ll use examples from these shows to
start a conversation about how we assess, the feedback we give, and what we might expect students to do with it. The session may help colleagues understand why students don’t always do what we would like them to do with the feedback we give. 

 
3: Writing aims and ILOs  Tue 29 Jan 2019 10-12noon
Dr Amanda Sykes    Book here

This session will introduce the concept of Constructive Alignment and will then use a workshop format to explore well (and poorly) written Aims and ILOs. Finally, you’ll get a chane to review and enhance any Aims and ILOs from your own discipline and / or Aims and ILOs you might currently be drafting. 

 
4: Assessment design  Thu 12 Feb 2019 12-2pm
Dr Amanda Sykes   Book here

Building on the concept of Constructive Alignment (indtroduced in the previous session), this session will use a workshop format to and address how ILOs can be assessed. The workshop will look at a variety of assessment types and their pros and cons. You’ll be invited to consider the design of your own courses / programmes. 

 
5: Designing authentic assessment to promote academic integrity and prevent plagiarism Mon 11 Mar 2019 (note new date) 2.30 - 4.30pm
Dr Matthew Williamson / Dr Amanda Sykes   Book here

We’ll discuss ideas of authentic assessment and provide examples of what we mean by this. We’ll then address authentic assessment in the context of your own teaching, and help you to consider how you might make the assessments you use throughout a course and / or programme authentic and relevant. 

 
6: Peer review tools for your students (Moodle, Aropä, Peerwise)  Wed 20 Mar 2019 12-2pm
Dr Amanda Sykes / Dr Vicki Dale / Dr Mary McVey   Book here

This session will address the topic of peer assessment and will attempt to answer the following questions: What is peer assessment? What can it be used for? Can it be used summatively or just formatively? In terms of enabling technologies, the session will introduce participants to Aropä, PeerWise and Moodle Workshop for peer assessment, and we will encourage staff to consider how they might use these tools in pedagogically effective ways to promote students’ active learning and collaboration.

Although the session will mainly draw on examples from Life Sciences, examples of peer assessment in other disciplines will be highlighted. Therefore, the workshop will be applicable to staff from any college looking to introduce peer assessment in their courses.

 

Developing Your Students Strand

1: International students and plagiarism: cultural differences and setting expectations  Thu 4 Oct 2018 12-2pm
 Dr Julia Bohlmann / Dr Michael McEwan   Book here

This session focuses on what plagiarism actually means in an international context, and will demonstrate that (in some instances, at least) plagiarism is the result of cultural differences and not a crime! This session is based on a recent review of plagiarism- focused literature, and gives guidance on how to make your teaching, your expectations, and your materials more accessible and more explicit. 

 
2: Supervising international research students (MRes & PhDs)

Wed

10 Oct 2018 12-2pm
 Dr Julia Bohlmann / Dr Jennifer Boyle / Dr Andrew Struan   Book here

Diverse cultural and educational backgrounds can have an influence on the performance and experience of international research students. This session provides a space to discuss experiences and challenges, and offers examples of good supervisory practice that you could think about adopting. The session also introduces resources that will be helpful to supervisors and their students on issues ranging from mental health to writing difficulties. 

 

(Rescheduled to January - see below)

3: Supporting students with maths, stats and numeracy

 
 Shazia Ahmed / Dr Michael McEwan   See below for booking

Regardless of subject area, a solid familiarity with maths and basic summary statistics will boost the skillset of your students when they graduate and start seeking work. This session is a chance to identify the mathematical needs of your students, to reflect on how students can improve their confidence and ability in maths, stats and numeracy, and it's also an opportunity to share good practice between subject areas.

I’m from Arts / Social Sciences, and I’d come because: maths and stats isn’t a core part of my teaching, but my students need these skills for their work and I am not sure how to help!
I’m from MVLS / Science & Engineering, and I’d come because: I get frustrated when my students don’t demonstrate the maths and statistics skills that I expect them to have. I want to help, but I have to focus my time on the science!

 
4: Encouraging student engagement with feedback, and developing feedback literacy Tue 13 Nov 2018 12-2pm
 Elina Koristashevskaya / Dr Jessica Bownes   Book here
This session will discuss approaches to encouraging and (where possible) embedding active engagement with feedback into the students’ academic practice. This session will also invite staff to consider the ways in which feedback is interpreted by students, and how to develop students’ feedback literacy to help them make the most of their feedback.   
5: Supervising Arts & SocSci dissertation students (UG & PGT) Tue 4 Dec 2018 12-2pm
Dr Andrew Struan / Dr Janis Davidson   Book here
The purpose of this session is to give staff a clearer understanding of the challenges and obstacles encountered by dissertation students. We'll consider common issues met by students as they transition through their dissertation and the student perception of support offered by supervisors. By considering the research process from the point of view of the inexperienced student, we can better support their academic performance.  
6: Supervising CoSE and MVLS dissertation students (UG & PGT) Thu 6 Dec 2018 12-2pm
Dr Scott Ramsay / Dr Jessica Bownes   Book here
The purpose of this session is to give staff a clearer understanding of the challenges and obstacles encountered by dissertation students. We will consider common issues met by students as they transition through their dissertation and the student perception of support offered by supervisors. By considering the research process from the inexperienced students’ point of view, we can expect the academic performance of these students to improve.  

(Rescheduled from original date in September)

3: Supporting students with maths, stats and numeracy

Fri 25 Jan 2019 11-1pm
 Shazia Ahmed / Dr Michael McEwan   Book here

Regardless of subject area, a solid familiarity with maths and basic summary statistics will boost the skillset of your students when they graduate and start seeking work. This session is a chance to identify the mathematical needs of your students, to reflect on how students can improve their confidence and ability in maths, stats and numeracy, and it's also an opportunity to share good practice between subject areas.

I’m from Arts / Social Sciences, and I’d come because: maths and stats isn’t a core part of my teaching, but my students need these skills for their work and I am not sure how to help!
I’m from MVLS / Science & Engineering, and I’d come because: I get frustrated when my students don’t demonstrate the maths and statistics skills that I expect them to have. I want to help, but I have to focus my time on the science!

 
7: Decolonising the curriculum: why and how?  Fri 15 Feb 2019 1-3pm
 Dr Carol Collins   Book here

This session will look at the growing imperative in HE Institutions to challenge assumptions about racial and civilisational hierarchies and their impact on academic study. The session will consider, through discussion and practical activities, why it might be important to challenge the historical contexts of knowledge and how, through considering course content, including biographies, you might make small changes to courses that can represent a more diverse student population and engage all students in challenging assumptions about knowledge. 

 

Annual Learning & Teaching Conference

Further to our series of CPD sessions, one of our major CPD events is the Annual Learning & Teaching Conference, held in the spring each year.