Veterinary Epidemiology: Methods In Surveillance And Field Investigation VETMED5019

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Summer
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

  To provide participants with knowledge and comprehension of essential elements of human and animal health in practise, such that they are able to identify, collate and synthesise disparate pieces of information of relevance to veterinary public health, make sensible decisions on the basis of their analyses of this information and other logistical factors, and communicate and act upon their findings to mitigate public health risks.

Timetable

The timetable for the 1-week residential component of this course is given below:

Monday
Practical and historical aspects of veterinary public health
- Surveillance
Deliverable public health objectives
Antimicrobial resistance in public health

Tuesday
The role of veterinary profession in public health
Outbreak investigation
- The role of (molecular) epidemiology
Case study 1

Wednesday
Public health policy
EU Legislation
Group assignment

Thursday
Health economics
Risk communication
Risk management
Case study 2

Friday
Leadership in veterinary public health
- Delegation of responsibility
- Resource management
Veterinary public health scenarios: student presentations

Requirements of Entry

This course is one of seven, which together comprise the Master of Veterinary Public Health programme. All courses are mandatory for the degree to be awarded.

Co-requisites

This course is one of seven, which together comprise the Master of Veterinary Public Health programme. All courses are mandatory for the degree to be awarded.

Assessment

This course will be assessed on the basis of 4 assignments given to the students during the residential course and completed by distance education. Submission of the completed assignments will be within three months of completion of the residential course (for full-time students only). In addition, students will be required to give an oral presentation to their peer group and tutors on the last day off the residential component of the course, which will also be assessed.

Main Assessment In: August

Course Aims

To provide participants with knowledge and comprehension of essential elements of human and animal health in practise, such that they are able to identify, collate and synthesise disparate pieces of information of relevance to veterinary public health, make sensible decisions on the basis of their analyses of this information and other logistical factors, and communicate and act upon their findings to mitigate public health risks.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course, a student should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical knowledge of the major historical events that have led to the development of modern (veterinary) public health
2. Critically evaluate the design, implementation and management of a surveillance programme
3. Interpret surveillance data
4. Formulate and summarise deliverable public health objectives
5. Critically evaluate the importance of antimicrobial (and other drug) resistance in human and animal health and judge the strength of any relationship between them
6. Recognise and critically discuss the role of the veterinary profession in public health
7. Formulate a strategy for investigating a disease outbreak and apply this in a simulated setting
8. Explain the role of molecular epidemiological techniques in outbreak investigations and surveillance
9. Summarise important elements of public health policy and European Union legislation relating to veterinary public health
10. Summarise the principles and importance of the standard measures of health economics
11. Calculate the standard measures of health economics
12. Recognise and discuss the ethical considerations in applying health economic measures
13. Communicate (both written and oral) risk information effectively to groups with different educational backgrounds
14. Design a practical risk management plan, including details of delegation of responsibilities and management of resources
15. Judge and adjust (as appropriate) the success of a risk management intervention
16. Respond positively to feedback and constructive criticism from peers and course tutors

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

NONE