Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery 4 VETMED4021

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Credits: 0
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Runs Throughout Semesters 1 and 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

BVMS 4 is the second of 2 years of the Clinical Phase of the BVMS programme. This phase aims to build on the foundation phase to provide a broad training in key elements of veterinary professional practice, with a focus on common and important problems and presentations encountered in veterinary work.

Timetable

Typical Timetable BVMS 4

Based on maximum 24 hours/week and averaging no more than 10hrs/week lectures, typical weekly timetables are shown below:

Workplace based learning is shown as hours/week but flexibility will be required to maximise the clinical opportunities available, so some sessions may run out-with these periods.

Cohort Teaching

AM

PM

Monday

Seminar (1h)

Lectures (2h)

Tuesday

Study

Lectures (2h)

Wednesday

Lectures (2h)

Free

Thursday

Lectures (2h)

Lectures (2h)

Friday

Lectures (2h) & PM Seminar* (1-2h)

Seminar (1h)

 

Group Practical/WPBL

AM

PM

Monday

Lectures (2h)

Workplace based learning (3-4h)

Tuesday

Practical (1-2h)

Practical (1-2h)

Wednesday

Lectures (2h)

Free

Thursday

 Practical (1-2h)

Practical(1-2h)

Friday

PM Seminar (1-2h)

Workplace based learning (3-4h)*

 

Group SDL/Formative

AM

PM

Monday

Lectures (2h)

Study

Tuesday

Lectures (2h)

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Wednesday

E-learning (2-4h)

Free

Thursday

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Students must have successfully completed the BVMS 3 course including achieving a pass in all compulsory but non-graded assessments and achieved grade D3 or better in all degree examinations in the preceding session.

Recommended Entry Requirements

Not applicable

Excluded Courses

Not applicable

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

In - Course assessments

Assessments will be varied between modules but may include:

■ Collaborative learning assignments

■ Clinical/practical skills assessments

 

Professional Portfolio

The purpose of the Professional Portfolio is to promote personal development planning, develop a capacity for critical reflection and reflective practice and to support a claim to have met learning outcomes of the course relating to professional skills. The portfolio will include elements relating to workplace-based learning, consolidation and synthesis and extra mural studies. Portfolio submission is compulsory and timely submission of the required number of portfolio assets forms 10% of the competency assessment in BVMS4.

 

End of Course Assessment

There will be an integrated summative assessment at the end of BVMS4.

There will be 2 components, each of which will be assessed under a separate course code (VETMED4019 & VETMED4021). There is no compensation between the 2 assessments.

 

Knowledge and understanding assessment (Marked against Schedule A descriptors)

Total 6hrs split over a few papers (may be delivered electronically or with practical spot test elements): Single best answer multiple choice questions & short answer question formats

Competency assessment (marked against Schedule B descriptors).

Competency assessment objective structured clinical examination (OSCE): 3 hour OSCE assessment.

 

Grades

The student will receive 2 grades for BVMS 4, one for the knowledge assessments (100% final written exam, assessed using Schedule A descriptors) and one for the competency assessment (10% professional portfolio submission, 90% OSCE, assessed using Schedule B descriptors)

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? No

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

 

Reassessment

A student may be offered reassessment of the written examination component of the Knowledge and Understanding assessment and/or the one component (OSCE) of the Competency assessment at the next available diet. Reassessment of summatively assessed coursework is not available.

Course Aims

The BVMS4 course forms the second of 2 years of the Clinical Phase of the BVMS programme. The aim of the Clinical Phase is to build on the Foundation Phase to provide a broad training in key elements of veterinary professional practice, with a focus on common and important problems and presentations encountered in veterinary work. Realistic scenarios form the basis for integrating clinical and scientific perspectives of veterinary practice. In this context the BVMS4 course aims to offer opportunities to develop knowledge in additional areas of clinical practice beyond those developed in BVMS3; extend skills and continue development of attitudes required to work in the clinical environment, to hone clinical decision making skills and to prepare students to take a greater responsibility for experiential learning in the subsequent Professional Phase of the programme.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

Apply growth in the skills, attitudes and responsibilities, in relation to Year 4 topics, required of a veterinary surgeon and be able to reflect on these

Apply effective written and verbal communication, in relation to Year 4 topics, expected of a veterinary surgeon

Apply increased capability in the use of diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical skills to a level expected of a new graduate in relation to Years 1-4 topics

Identify those infectious diseases that occur in the UK and those which have a global distribution

Take an appropriate case history, perform a full clinical examination and evidence knowledge of risk factors & clinical signs of disease of adult ruminants

Assess reproductive problems in species of veterinary interest based on history and clinical examination findings.

Identify clinical signs indicative of a neurolocomotor problem.

Perform and evaluate a neurological and orthopaedic examination in domestic species.

Perform and interpret a clinical examination in a range of non-traditional companion animal species.

Perform and interpret dermatological and ophthalmological examinations in a range of domestic species but with emphasis on the dog, cat and horse

Identify the clinical signs that are indicative of disease outbreak in intensively farmed animals

Be aware of the potential infectious agents responsible for disorders of the different body systems in domestic species, and be able to construct appropriate differential diagnoses for each disorder

Identify agents and apply knowledge of the aetiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of key diseases/conditions of adults in the ruminant production cycle

Explain the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of reproductive conditions of species of veterinary interest

Explain the common causes of lameness and neurological dysfunction in domestic species.

Explain the common causes of disease in non-traditional companion animal species and zoo animals

Explain the common causes of dermatological and ophthalmological diseases in a range of domestic species but with emphasis on the dog, cat and horse

Explain the common causes of disease outbreaks in intensively farmed animals.

Select, undertake and interpret appropriate clinico-pathological tests and suitable diagnostic investigations relevant to global disease of veterinary importance, with particular focus on infectious agents, both notifiable and non-notifiable

Apply a systematic approach to investigation of adult stock and (including at the flock and herd level) and evidence knowledge of the relevant diagnostic tools

Select, undertake and interpret appropriate clinico-pathological tests and suitable diagnostic investigations relevant to reproductive disease

Explain the commonly used aids for diagnosis (and appraise results) of the orthopaedic and neurologic case including radiography, CT, MRI, ultrasonography, scintigraphy synovial fluid analysis, CSF analysis, serology and arthroscopy.

Explain the commonly used aids for diagnosis (and appraise results) of the dermatological and ophthalmological case including skin scrapes, allergy tests, serology tests, and ophthalmoscopy.

Explain the approach to the diagnosis and assessment of disease in non-traditional companion animal species and zoo animals and specifically the importance of dietary and environmental factors

Select and interpret appropriate clinico-pathological tests and suitable diagnostic investigations relevant to intensively farmed animals

Formulate and institute a therapeutic/prevention plan to manage patients with diseases of global significance, demonstrating an understanding of principles of dietary management, microbiology, pharmacology and toxicology

Evaluate current therapies and formulate control/prevention plans for common diseases adult ruminants (at an individual and group level).

Evidence knowledge of the issues of production animal therapeutics within the context of food residues and development of anthelmintic and antimicrobial resistance

Advise on appropriate management for common and important reproductive conditions in species of veterinary importance

Formulate a therapeutic plan to treat/manage neurolocomotor conditions, demonstrating an understanding of principles of dietary management, microbiology, pharmacology and toxicology and surgery.

Formulate a therapeutic plan to treat/manage a non-traditional companion animal patient.

Formulate a therapeutic plan to treat/manage a dermatological or ophthalmological problems in a range of domestic species but with emphasis on the dog, cat and horse

Advise on appropriate management for common and important conditions in intensively farmed animals

Apply knowledge of epidemiological studies to assess global risk in veterinary patients and identify strategies to minimise risk

Analyse herd and flock performance and epidemiological data to summarise the impact of diseases and recommend preventative interventions

Analyse individual and herd reproductive performance and epidemiological data and summarise to recommend preventative interventions

Analyse performance and epidemiological data and summarise to recommend preventative interventions in intensively farmed animals

Apply an appreciation of the impact of domesticated species on society and environment in relation to Year 4 topics

Apply an understanding of notifiable disease in the main jurisdictions inc UK, North America, and South East Asia and underpinning regulations e.g. health and safety precautions required when dealing with potential zoonotic infections

Be able to design effective biosecurity plans for disease containment for both the individual and group of animals.

Discuss measures to prevent transmission of zoonotic disease and employ the relevant legislation in relation to use of products in food producing species

Apply an understanding of legislation it relate to reproductive disease in animals of veterinary importance

Follow the appropriate legislative guidelines that pertain to the housing, handling and treatment of zoo animals and non-traditional companion animals

identify the risks of zoonotic diseases present in zoo animals and non-traditional companion animals

Follow the appropriate legislative guidelines to prescribe and store medicines in intensively farmed animals

Identify factors; individual, organisational, client and financial considerations that impact on veterinary practice in a business context as they apply to Year 4 topics

Use research methods to collect, analyse and interpret data in the light of published information as it relates to Year 4 topics.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must complete all components of the course including compulsory attendance at all practical and clinical work sessions. A minimum of Grade D in the summative assessments, and completion of all formative assignments.