Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery 3 VETMED3023

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Credits: 0
  • Level: Level 3 (SCQF level 9)
  • Typically Offered: Runs Throughout Semesters 1 and 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

BVMS 3 is the first of 2 years of the Clinical Phase of the BVMS programme. This phase aims to build on the foundation phase to provide a broad training in key elements of veterinary professional practice, with a focus on common and important problems and presentations encountered in veterinary work.

Timetable

Typical Timetable BVMS 3

Based on maximum 24 hours/week and averaging no more than 10hrs/week lectures, typical weekly timetables are shown below:

Workplace based learning is shown as hours/week but flexibility will be required to maximise the clinical opportunities available, so some sessions may run out-with these periods.

Cohort Teaching

AM

PM

Monday

Seminar (1h)

Lectures (2h)

Tuesday

Study

Lectures (2h)

Wednesday

Lectures (2h)

Free

Thursday

Lectures (2h)

Lectures (2h)

Friday

Lectures (2h) & PM Seminar* (1-2h)

Seminar (1h)

 

Group Practical/WPBL

AM

PM

Monday

Lectures (2h)

Workplace based learning (3-4h)

Tuesday

Practical (1-2h)

Practical (1-2h)

Wednesday

Lectures (2h)

Free

Thursday

 Practical (1-2h)

Practical(1-2h)

Friday

PM Seminar (1-2h)

Workplace based learning (3-4h)*

 

Group SDL/Formative

AM

PM

Monday

Lectures (2h)

Study

Tuesday

Lectures (2h)

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Wednesday

E-learning (2-4h)

Free

Thursday

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Self-directed/collaborative learning (2-3h)

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Students must have successfully completed the BVMS 2 course including having achieved a pass in all compulsory but non-graded assessments and achieved grade D3 or better in all degree examinations in the preceding session.

Recommended Entry Requirements

Not applicable

Excluded Courses

Not applicable

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

 

End of Course Assessment

There are 2 end of course assessments, each of which will be reported under a separate course code (VETMED3022 & VETMED3023).

There is no compensation between the 2 assessments.

 

Knowledge and understanding assessment (Marked against Schedule A descriptors)

The grade for this assessment will be derived from summatively assessed end of course written examination (100%).

 

Competency assessment (marked against Schedule B descriptors).

The grade for this assessment will be derived from the grade achieved for the 1.5hr end of course objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) (100%).

 

End of course written examination

Total 6hrs split over a few papers (may be delivered electronically or with practical spot test elements): Single best answer multiple choice questions, extended matched questions & short answer question formats.

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? No

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

 

Reassessment

A student may be offered reassessment of the written examination component of the Knowledge and Understanding assessment and/or the one component (OSCE) of the Competency assessment at the next available diet. Reassessment of summatively assessed coursework is not available.

Course Aims

The BVMS3 Course forms the first of 2 years of the Clinical Phase of the BVMS Programme. The aim of the Clinical Phase is to build on the Foundation Phase to provide a broad training in key elements of veterinary professional practice, with a focus on common and important problems and presentations encountered in veterinary work. Realistic scenarios form the basis for integrating clinical and scientific perspectives of veterinary practice. In this context the BVMS3 course aims to offer opportunities to develop knowledge in specific subject areas, skills and attitudes required to work in the clinical environment, to begin development of clinical decision making skills and to start to equip students to take a greater responsibility for experiential learning in the subsequent professional phase of the programme.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

Apply growth in the skills, attitudes and responsibilities, in relation to Year 3 topics, required of a veterinary surgeon and be able to reflect on these

Apply effective written and verbal communication, in relation to year 3 topics, expected of a veterinary surgeon

Apply increased capability in the use of animal handling, diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical skills to a level expected of a new graduate in relation to Years 1-3 topics

Outline the causes of common and important behavioural conditions in the cat, dog and horse and synthesise information from a clinical history, examination and other diagnostic testing to propose likely differential diagnoses

 

Perform and interpret a clinical examination, including a pain assessment, in a veterinary patient that requires emergency treatment.

Assimilate from history and clinical examination, the information to recognise cardiorespiratory & haemopoietic disease.

Apply competence in the principles of clinical reasoning (emergency and non-emergency situations) by identifying and integrating relevant clinical and pathological information, listing common alimentary, hepatic, and pancreatic causes of the clinical presentation

Prioritise and plan appropriate actions and investigations.

Identify clinical signs indicating urinary/urogenital, endocrine/metabolic, oncological/paraneoplastic conditions and perform a relevant clinical examination.

Take an appropriate case history, perform a full clinical examination and evidence knowledge of clinical signs of disease of young ruminants and periparturient ruminants

Illustrate the methods used in the harvesting and further processing of food of animal origin

Identify and interpret the main hazards associated with farming and food production

Explain the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of conditions of veterinary interest that require emergency treatment

Explain the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of cardiorespiratory & haemopoietic disease conditions

Explain the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of alimentary conditions of veterinary interest

Explain the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of urinary/urogenital, endocrine/metabolic, and oncological/paraneoplastic conditions

Identify agents and apply knowledge of the aetiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of key diseases/conditions of the periparturient, neonatal and growing periods in the ruminant production cycle

Apply knowledge of the aetiology, pathophysiology & epidemiology of conditions of veterinary interest, including potentially emerging diseases of common in species kept for food- appraising animal welfare throughout the food chain

Detail ante and post mortem inspection of food animals and correctly identify conditions affecting the quality and safety of meat

Select and explain appropriate diagnostic techniques to investigate common veterinary emergencies, including problems arising under anaesthesia, and interpret the findings of these techniques.

Select, undertake and interpret appropriate clinico-pathological tests and suitable diagnostic investigations relevant to cardiorespiratory and haemopoietic disease

Select appropriate samples for the investigation of alimentary, hepatic, and pancreatic conditions and explain how the different diagnostic imaging modalities can be used in the diagnosis of alimentary, hepatic, and pancreatic conditions

Select, undertake and interpret appropriate clinico-pathological tests and suitable diagnostic investigations relevant for urinary/urogenital, endocrine/metabolic, and oncological/paraneoplastic conditions

Apply a systematic approach to investigation of young stock and periparturient disease (including at the flock and herd level) and evidence knowledge of the relevant diagnostic tools

Apply food sampling techniques and be able to appraise results of microbiological examinations

Advise on appropriate management for common and important behavioural conditions in the cat, dog and horse and recognise the circumstances where euthanasia is required

Formulate an analgesic, sedative or anaesthetic plan for a veterinary patient, demonstrating an understanding of the underpinning principles, including pharmacology & the appropriate safe use of anaesthetic equipment.

Formulate a therapeutic plan to treat/manage common veterinary emergencies including complications arising under anaesthesia, demonstrating an understanding of the underpinning science principles.

Formulate and institute a therapeutic/management plan to treat a patient with cardiorespiratory & common cardiorespiratory and haematological disorders diseases, demonstrating an understanding of principles of dietary management, microbiology, pharmacology and toxicology

Formulate a therapeutic plan to treat/manage common alimentary, hepatic and pancreatic disease demonstrating knowledge of the relevant medical and surgical treatment modalities, which includes recognising the need for and formulating guidelines for nutritional management.

Formulate and institute a therapeutic plan to manage a patient with a urinary/urogenital, endocrine/metabolic, oncological/paraneoplastic condition. demonstrating an understanding of principles of dietary management, microbiology, pharmacology and toxicology relevant to specific diseases; encompassing surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy

Explain current therapies and formulate control/prevention plans of common diseases of the periparturient, neonatal and growing periods of ruminants (at an individual and group level).

Evidence knowledge of the issues of production animal therapeutics within the context of food residues and development of anthelmintic and antimicrobial resistance

Illustrate the importance of the prevention of Veterinary Medical residues

Apply knowledge of epidemiological studies to assess anaesthetic risk in veterinary patients and identify strategies to minimise risk

Formulate and implement preventative veterinary medicine interventions for alimentary tract diseases based on analysis of datasets and epidemiological data

Analyse herd and flock performance and epidemiological data to summarise the impact of diseases and recommend preventative interventions

Analyse food spoilage stages and be able to formulate preventative measures

Compare hygienic status of food processing plants, personnel and practice identifying non-compliance in context

Interpret premises design and be able to implement risk based food management systems

Apply an appreciation of the impact of domesticated species on society and environment in relation to Year 3 topics

Discuss the ethical considerations and legal responsibilities which underpin veterinary professional judgement

Explain the current guidelines and legislative requirements that apply when stocking, prescribing, dispensing and disposing of drugs used in veterinary medicine, including cytotoxic & controlled drugs.

Apply an understanding of medical physics and ionising regulations

Discuss measures to prevent transmission of zoonotic disease and employ the relevant legislation in relation to use of products in food producing species

Judge courses of action against current guidelines and legislative framework to ensure safe working practices and protect personnel

Identify factors; individual, organisational, client and financial considerations that impact on veterinary practice in a business context as they apply to Year 3 topics

Use research methods to collect, analyse and interpret data in the light of published information as it relates to Year 3

topics.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must complete all components of the course including compulsory attendance at all practical and clinical work sessions. A minimum of Grade D in the summative assessments, and completion of all formative assignments.