Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery 2 VETMED2022

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Veterinary Medicine
  • Credits: 120
  • Level: Level 2 (SCQF level 8)
  • Typically Offered: Runs Throughout Semesters 1 and 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

BVMS 2 is the second of 2 years of the Foundation Phase of the BVMS Programme and builds on the areas studied in BVMS 1. This phase aims to provide a firm foundation in knowledge and skills for further clinical study, integrating concepts of structure and function, health and disease in contexts which emphasise the clinical and societal applications of this knowledge and encourage the development of skills for lifelong learning.

Timetable

The course adopts a modular structure, with each module of teaching focused around a specific body system. The course consists of 6 modules, within each module, there are typically three weeks of intensive instruction followed by a week focussed on consolidation and synthesis of content and concepts. Based on maximum 24 hours/week and averaging no more than 12hrs/week lectures, typical weekly timetables are shown below:

Weekly timetable BVMS2

INTENSIVE INSTRUCTION

(3 weeks)

AM

PM

Monday

Self study

Lectures (3h)

Tuesday

Supported self-directed learning (2h)

Lectures (3h)

Wednesday

Practical (4h)

Free

Thursday

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Lectures (3h)

Friday

Lecture (3h)

Practical(4h)

 

CONSOLIDATION & SYNTHESIS (1 week)

AM

PM

Monday

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Tuesday

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Wednesday

Practical (2h)

Free

Thursday

Tutorial (2h)

Supported self-directed learning (4h)

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Students must have successfully completed the BVMS1 course.

Recommended Entry Requirements

Not applicable

Excluded Courses

Not applicable

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

End of Course Assessment

There are 2 end of course assessments, each of which will be reported under a separate course code (VETMED2022 & VETMED2023).

 

Knowledge and understanding assessment (Marked against Schedule A descriptors)

The grade for this assessment will be derived from summatively assessed course work (10%) and end of course written examination (90%).

 

Competency assessment (marked against Schedule B descriptors).

The grade for this assessment will be derived from the grade achieved for the Professional portfolio (10%) and a 2 hr end of course objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) (90%).

 

A candidate must achieve a minimum of Grade D in both the OSCE examination and in the Portfolio in order for the candidate to progress to the next phase of the programme.

 

Summatively assessed coursework:

It will be compulsory for all Students to submit a range of coursework assignments for assessment

throughout the course. The students will be exposed to each type of coursework assignment formatively before it is used as part of the summative coursework assessment.

Coursework assignments may include material from one or more modules.

The coursework assignments will be varied but may include:

- Self-directed or collaborative learning assignment (self/peer assessed against generic feedback)

- Presentations

- Essays

 

End of course written examination

Total 6hrs split over a few papers which may include testing methods such as single best answer multiple choice questions, extended matching questions, short answer question formats, problem solving, practical spot test and data handling questions.

 

Professional Portfolio

A Professional Portfolio will be summatively assessed at the end of the course. The purpose of the

Professional Portfolio is to promote personal development planning, support the development of skills

in reflection and reflective practice and demonstrate that students have met the intended learning outcomes of the course relating to professional skills.

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? No

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

 

Reassessment

A student may be offered reassessment of the written examination component of the Knowledge and Understanding assessment and/or the two components (professional portfolio and OSCE) of the competency assessment at the next available diet. Reassessment of summatively assessed coursework is not available.

Course Aims

The BVMS2 course forms the second of 2 years of the Foundation Phase of the BVMS programme. The Foundation Phase aims to provide a firm foundation in knowledge and skills for further clinical study, integrating concepts of structure and function, health and disease in contexts which emphasise the clinical and societal applications of this knowledge and encourage the development of skills for lifelong learning. In this context, the aim of the BVMS 2 course is to

■  introduce additional principles of veterinary science as well as building on those covered in BVMS 1;

■ promote the development of additional clinical and professional skills as well as refining those obtained in BVMS1;

■ study the body systems not covered in BVMS 1, illustrated by relevant clinical cases.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

Apply basic written and verbal communication expected of a veterinary student undertaking clinical EMS

Apply core attitudes required of a veterinary surgeon and act responsibly in professional contexts

Identify and describe the appearance of healthy niche species including breed, colour and markings, weight/body condition, age, purpose and behaviour

Apply appropriate handling and restraint of niche species for the purposes of their movement, sex determination or performance of clinical procedures

Apply knowledge to perform a basic clinical examination in animals and procedures such as neurolocalisation of lesions, ophthalmic and auroscopic tests and procedures essential for the support of animal respiration.

Apply competence in basic surgical skills including the surgical preparation, suturing, gowning and gloving

Apply skills, knowledge and principles from previous Foundation phase modules to underpin the teaching in this module

Reflect on a variety of relevant experiences to plan and evaluate your own learning and professional development in the context of year 2 teaching and experience

Work independently or as part of a group to collate, evaluate, integrate and present appropriately referenced information from a range of sources to provide a balanced argument or to develop or interpret a plan of investigation

Describe and identify the normal structure and function of the common integument.

Explain the processes underlying healing in different tissue types and methods of managing healing

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the locomotor system and apply correct directional terminology.

Describe and identify the processes involved with normal bone formation, growth and remodelling

Explain mediators of inflammation, immunopathological (hypersensitivity) mechanisms and how these can affect the skin.

Describe key characteristics including transmission and control of ectoparasites, fungi and viruses harboured by blood feeding organisms and explain how the host is affected.

Describe weight bearing and gait during normal locomotion and lameness and explain options available for localising the site of the lameness.

Discuss and demonstrate the safe performance of radiography and identify normal locomotor anatomy on radiographs and ultrasound images

Describe and identify some common pathological processes affecting the locomotor system, explain their pathogenesis and some of the procedures used in their diagnosis

Explain the mode of action and the pharmacokinetics of NSAIDS, local anaesthetics and muscle relaxants

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the peripheral nervous system including the cranial nerves

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the brain

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the spinal cord and vertebral column

Describe how the component parts of the nervous system are structurally and functionally organised and integrated including different types of sensory input to the nervous system, their central projections and neuroendocrine control.

Describe and explain the embryological development of the nervous system and associated structures and the consequences of developmental disorders

Describe tests to investigate the nervous system, interpret their results and use this information to discuss potential treatment strategies

Describe the mechanisms underlying the sensation of pain, the pharmacology of drugs used to alleviate pain and evaluate evidence for pain in animals.

Explain the pharmacology of drugs that affect the central and autonomic nervous systems.

Explain the mechanisms regulating posture and locomotion including the hierarchy of motor control and spinal reflexes

List the routes of infection, describe the pathological features associated with selective disorders and explain the causes of tissue damage and mechanisms of repair within the central nervous system.

Describe the clinical consequences of abnormalities arising in the component parts of the nervous system and explain how to localise neurological problems

Discuss animal ethics with regard to the moral status of animals and different ethical frameworks

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the respiratory system.

Describe the physiology of respiration and the regulatory processes involved.

Discuss the metabolic implications of anaerobic and aerobic respiration

Describe the principles of inhalational anaesthesia, the pharmacology of the drugs used

Explain the importance of viral genetic change, and other factors, in the emergence of new viral diseases

Describe the aetiology and pathogenesis of basic respiratory disease processes and their impact

Describe the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of drugs commonly used in the treatment of respiratory conditions

Describe tests to investigate respiratory dysfunction, interpret their results and use this information to discuss potential treatment strategies

Explain the role of environment as a contributing factor to animal health and performance

Describe and identify the normal structure, function and topography of the cardiovascular system

Explain the pathophysiology of heart failure and the systemic response to haemorrhage

Describe the pathology of common cardiovascular disorders

Describe the common microbiological and parasitic causes of cardiac disorders

Explain the pharmacology of drugs commonly used to treat cardiovascular disorders

Describe tests to investigate cardiovascular dysfunction, interpret their results and use this information to discuss potential treatment strategies

Discuss fetal development of the circulatory system and the anomalies that can arise.

Describe the Vet's role in helping clients with the responsibilities and difficulties of purchasing and insuring a horse.

Identify the main niche species and their taxonomy

Identify and compare the main anatomical and physiological differences that exist between niche species

Describe the appropriate management and nutritional requirements of niche species in a range of settings to ensure good standards of basic care

Identify the characteristics of normal and adaptive behaviour patterns within niche species to identify possible signs of illness and or welfare issues

Identify common pathologies related to poor management of niche species and appropriate preventative measures

Describe the responsibilities of the Veterinary profession relating to the legal and regulatory frameworks associated with niche species

Explain basic concepts of wildlife rehabilitation and when it is appropriate to release an animal into the wild

Explain basic concepts of animal conservation including reproductive success and population management.

Apply safe working practices in the PM room, describe how to perform and record a basic post mortem examination and collect suitable samples for ancillary testing

Review the fundamental pathological mechanisms which underpin disease processes and relate these to changes in the structure and function of body systems in response to clinical disease

Describe the structure, function and regulation of endocrine systems.

Describe the common zoonotic risks associated with parasitic infection, be able to collect and process appropriate samples and use these to identify common parasites.

Collect and process appropriate samples and use these to identify common parasites

Describe the processes which ensure animal welfare, quality and safety of food and food products of animal origin from farm to fork

Discuss the importance of genetics in improving animal production systems worldwide and potential applications of transgenic animals, cloned animals and stem cells.

Follow safe procedures for processing and analysis of microbiological samples and explain the importance of microbiological testing in ensuring food safety and informing clinical diagnosis.

Describe the basic principles of diagnosis, staging and therapy for neoplastic disease and relate these to underlying mechanisms of disease

Describe the organisation of a Veterinary practice and appropriate dispensing, use and storage of Veterinary medicines

Describe and discuss the role of the Veterinary Professional in international society and recall how legal and regulatory frameworks underpin veterinary practice.

Describe the structure, function and regulation of endocrine systems

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students on the BVMS 2 Foundation Phase course must complete all components of the course including compulsory attendance at all practical and tutorial sessions. Students must complete all course work.