Designing Places URBAN5010

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 10
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

This course aims to provide an introduction to Urban Design as the process of making places for people. It aims to develop an appreciation of the importance and process of design in creating high quality places and enhancing the public realm.

Timetable

The course will start with a full day drawing workshop and then be delivered in 3 hourly blocks, once per week, over 5 consecutive weeks.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements:

None

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment:

The course is assessed through an in-depth analysis and design proposal for a site in Glasgow. This will include an analysis of physical urban form, movement, activity and a design framework that proposes how development might evolve in the future (maximum 2,500 words with a minimum of five illustrations). Presented in a professional report style.

 

This is an applied assessment with relatively limited background reading, as typical of an academic essay. Therefore, the drawings are in addition to the 2,500 words but substitute for a significant proportion of the reading requirement.

Course Aims

This course aims to provide an introduction to Urban Design as the process of making places for people. It aims to develop an appreciation of the importance and process of design in creating high quality places and enhancing the public realm.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course and having undertaken the relevant reading and assignments, students should be able to:

■ debate the importance & process of design in creating high quality places and enhancing public realm for benefit of all in society;

■ summarise, interpret and critique urban design theories and apply them to a project;

■ demonstrate they are familiar and understand the language and terminology of land use and urban design, and can apply the visual tools and methods used to present and articulate urban design ideas;

■ differentiate the relationships that exist between market processes, built form, different development models & patterns of movement, and evaluate the links between design of place and climate change;

■ consider how best to generate & capture added value for both particular interests & wider community;

■ appreciate and evaluate the use of different design sensitive tools and mechanism for place-making.

■ evaluate effectiveness of alternative design approaches, and developments in the policy agenda that have emphasised the design/physical dimension of regeneration;

■ formulate an opinion and contribute to the debate on urban space design; and

■ apply drawing and mapping skills as ways to communicate ideas.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.

 

Minimum requirement for award of credit for students on MSc City Planning and MSc City Planning & Real Estate Development is D3 or above.

 

Students on other qualifications then University standard regulations apply.