Theatre Studies 2:Classical To Modern THEATRE2001

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Culture and Creative Arts
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 2 (SCQF level 8)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

This course offers a historical and critical survey of the dominant forms of theatre practice in Europe before 1900. It is designed to introduce students to broad theoretical concepts, such as those in Aristotle's Poetics, Neo-classicism, and Naturalism and to assist them in investigating the influence of such movements on dramaturgy and theatre practice within the relevant socio-historical context.

Timetable

2 lectures per week (M, W, 3-4pm) plus 1 hour seminar per week (slots Tu 3-4pm, Tu 4-5pm, Th 3-4pm, Th 4-5pm). No lectures on: M and W of week 6 (reading week). No seminars in week 1 or week 6 (reading week).

Requirements of Entry

Satisfactory completion of both Level 1 TS courses with neither course attaining less than grade D.

Assessment

1 x 90 minute exam: students will be required to answer two questions, one relating to material in second part of semester; and one comprising a comparative question taken from materials across the whole semester. (Weighting: 50%).
1x2500 word essay relating to material in first part of the semester (weighting 50%).

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

This course aims to:
1. provide an historical and critical survey of the major dominant forms of theatre practice in Europe up to the early C20;
2. analyse historical, dramatic and performance texts using an appropriate critical vocabulary and with an understanding of relevant social and theatrical conditions;
3. introduce influential theoretical concepts, such as those in Aristotle's Poetics, Neo-classicism, and Naturalism; and,
4. investigate the influence of such movements on dramaturgy and theatre practice within the relevant socio-historical context.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

On the successful completion of this module students will be able to:
1. analyse historical dramatic and performance texts using an appropriate critical vocabulary and knowledge of relevant social and theatrical conditions;
2. demonstrate an appreciation of the meaning and significance of theatre and the theatre text in different historical contexts;
3. read the critical literature critically, and be able to identify problems clearly for discussion in seminars;
4. use seminars with confidence as a way of clarifying and evaluating ideas, and as a means to exploring theoretical issues through practical application; and,
5. present ideas critically, clearly and coherently in academic essays, developing well-structured arguments, and observing the disciplines of referencing, footnoting and bibliography.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.