Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

Globalization and the Nation State SPS5024

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

Globalization, by definition, fundamentally challenges the role and significance of the nation state, the central political institution of the modern world. This course examines how that tension has developed, how it has been managed, and with what results.

Timetable

Lectures: one hour per week

Seminars: one hour per week

Requirements of Entry

NONE

Excluded Courses

none

Co-requisites

none

Assessment

One assignment testing knowledge of key concepts (1,000 words) 25% (especially related to ILOs 1,2,)

One essay of 3,000 words 75 % of assessment (especially related to ILOs 1,2,3,4)

These assessments are in line with other taught courses in the degree.

Course Aims

1. To introduce students to a series of topics and debates in the area of globalization 

2. To encourage students to think about the variety of questions raised in the study of modern political economy, and situate them in a broad context of economic and political change.

3. To promote the students' critical understanding of secondary literature across the full range of topics relevant to globalization, including, for example, GATT and tariff issues.

4. To encourage students to express their ideas and put forward arguments on complex subjects in the recent political economy of globalization 

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

1. articulate a critical understanding and systematic knowledge of the relationship between globalization and the nation state.

2. critically evaluate theories and evidence relevant to the subject  

3. apply critical analysis in order to evaluate key issues concerning political decision-making in shaping economic developments

4. synthesize complex theories from the frontiers of the discipline  with appropriately evaluated evidence

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.