Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

Globalisation Of International Banking And Finance SPS5021

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

This elective explores the process and the impact of globalisation on international financial and banking systems. Topics include the development and characteristics of national banking systems, the process of integration of financial markets, financial innovation, development of prudential supervision and regulation, and the causes and consequences of recent international financial crises.

Timetable

Two Hours on Tuesdays from 2pm to 4pm. The course begins in the second week of January and ends in the 4th week of March. The course is taught by Professor Catherine Schenk.

Requirements of Entry

2.1 Honours degree or equivalent. Please note this course is offered subject to staff availability.

Assessment

individual 4,000 word assignment

Course Aims

This elective explores the process and the impact of globalisation on international financial and banking systems. Topics include the development and characteristics of national banking systems, financial innovation, development of prudential supervision, the effectiveness of capital controls, and the causes and consequences of recent international financial crises.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

On completion of the module students should be able to:

 

Describe the pattern of the expansion of international financial activity.

 

Explain the differences between national banking and financial systems

in key countries in Europe, North America and East Asia

 

Explain the evolution of international finance and banking since 1945

 

Discuss the arguments for and against regulation of international finance

 

Analyse and compare international financial crises across time and space

 

This course will give the students the opportunity to practice the skills of critical evaluation and discursive dialogue which were developed earlier in the programme.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

  See Code of Assessment