Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

Ways of Living: Studying Different Worlds SOCIO4127

  • Academic Session: 2021-22
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1 (Alternate Years)
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

One of the distinctive features of the Sociology programme at the University of Glasgow is its combination of sociological, criminological and anthropological perspectives. This course provides an opportunity to engage with a range of key themes and debates in social anthropology, one of sociology's closest cognate disciplines. Building on and extending knowledge about social anthropology gained at pre-Honours level, the distinctiveness of this Honours course lies in its broad focus: after two sessions introducing the discipline and its research methods, eight substantive areas of anthropological research and debate will be examined through the study of both 'classic' texts and recent research conducted in many different countries across the world. Illustrative material from ethnographic films will also be used in the course. Ambitious in scope, this course seeks to demonstrate not only how useful an advanced knowledge of anthropology can be as part of a Sociology degree but also, and more radically, why anthropology matters, due to its potential to transform our own lives and those of other people.

Timetable

None

Requirements of Entry

In order to take this course you need to have met the requirements for entry into our Honours Programme. This means achieving a grade of 'D' or better in Sociology 1A and 1B and a 'C' or better in Sociology 2A and 2B. You also have to comply with the College of Social Science regulations for progression to Honours.

Excluded Courses

None.

Co-requisites

None.

Assessment

One 'critical reflection' of no more than 1,500 words (excluding the bibliography) on a published piece of anthropological research (chosen from a list set by the course convenors), focusing on the methodological, ethical and political issues raised by the research in question. The critical reflection is worth 30% of the final mark for the course.

 

One essay of no more than 3,000 words (excluding the bibliography). A list of essay questions will be provided, but students will be able to design their own question, subject to the approval of the course convenors. The essay is worth 70% of the final mark for the course.

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable for Honours courses

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. Where, exceptionally, reassessment on Honours courses is required to satisfy professional/accreditation requirements, only the overall course grade achieved at the first attempt will contribute to the Honours classification. For non-Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

As part of the Sociology Honours programme, this course's general aim is to provide students with an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key themes and debates in anthropology. More specifically, the course aims to:

■ Allow students to build on and extend knowledge about social anthropology gained at pre-Honours levels, through examining a wide range of key themes, debates and perspectives;

■ Enable students to discuss and evaluate both 'classic' texts in anthropology and more recent research conducted in many different countries across the world; and

■ Debate the contribution social anthropology can make to understanding, and potentially changing, the contemporary world.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Identify, compare and evaluate different anthropological perspectives on a wide range of topics, drawing on research-based evidence from countries across the world;

■ Demonstrate an awareness of methodological, ethical and political issues associated with anthropological research;

■ Discuss and assess arguments about the contribution social anthropology can make to understanding, and potentially changing, the contemporary world.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.