Political Ideologies POLITIC4134

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

This course explores different accounts of 'ideology' and examines the different methods for identifying 'ideology', their construction, development and impact.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Assessment

Assessment

Summative assessment is based on one essay of between 2,000 and 2,500 words (40%), an exam of two hours where they attempt to answer two questions out of six (50%) and oral participation (10%).

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

Reassessments are normally available for all courses, except those which contribute to the Honours classification. For non Honours courses, students are offered reassessment in all or any of the components of assessment if the satisfactory (threshold) grade for the overall course is not achieved at the first attempt. This is normally grade D3 for undergraduate students and grade C3 for postgraduate students. Exceptionally it may not be possible to offer reassessment of some coursework items, in which case the mark achieved at the first attempt will be counted towards the final course grade. Any such exceptions for this course are described below. 

Course Aims

This course explores different accounts of 'ideology' and examines the different methods for identifying 'ideology', their construction, development and impact. The course then concentrates on Michael Freeden's conceptual approach to studying ideology. It assesses the core principles of ideologies, and investigates how they adapt, challenge and interchange with one another over key questions of political action. The course covers various thinkers and schools of thought: Daniel Bell, Francis Fukuyama, Orthodox Marxism, Karl Mannheim, Antonio Gramsci, the New Left, Althusserian Marxism, and Anarchism.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Identify different interpretation of 'ideology'

■ Identify and assess distinctive methods for studying ideologies

■ Describe and illustrate with appropriate examples, and using appropriate conceptual methods, key similarities and differences between and within ideologies.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.