Civil Society and Social Capital: Comparative Perspectives POLITIC4131

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The course will examine classical and competing modern conceptions of civil society and social capital, and will employ comparative perspectives from western and non-western societies to explore critical issues and policy debates. 

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

- Two-hour, unseen exam (50%)

- 2000 - 2500 word case study (40%)

- Participation (10%). The mark will be based on assessment of a presentation which will be marked by the lecturer. The delivery of the presentation will count towards the mark and students will receive written feedback on it.

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

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Course Aims

The course is taught from an explicitly international perspective and draws on comparative case analysis from relevant academic literature and student investigation. It will examine classical and competing modern conceptions of civil society and social capital, and will employ comparative perspectives from western and non-western societies to explore critical issues and policy debates. Ideas about social capital and civil society have influenced academic discussions across social science disciplines and policy discussions in governments across the world, as well as in key international institutions such as the OECD and World Bank. The course will examine comparative research to evaluate the appropriateness and effects of policies and to explore critical issues such as inequality, diversity, the role of the state, the nature and function of bonding, bridging and linking ties, differing understandings of the political role of civil society, cultural vs. institutional explanations, and the 'dark side' of social capital.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Analyse, critique and compare theoretical conceptions of civil society and social capital.

■ Articulate the relationship between civil society and social capital.

■ Assess at least one of the critical issues listed above.

■ Assess the salience and effectiveness of policies promoting civil society and social capital in different political and cultural contexts.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.