Chinese Politics POLITIC4124

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

This course will examine the apparent paradoxes of politics today in the People's Republic of China by looking at (a) the changing foundations of CCP legitimacy and political support, and (b) the political and social consequences of China's adoption of a "socialist market economy". The course will integrate academic literature on China's institutional and economic transformation with popular Chinese debates on changing national and cultural identities.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt 

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

An essay of 2,000-2500 words and a literature review of the same length (45% each), plus a 20 minute presentation, with Power Points handed in, completed in groups (10%).

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

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Course Aims

Chinese politics can appear paradoxical. While communist one-party states around the world collapsed after 1989, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has retained power. At the same time the CCP has presided over sustained market-led economic growth and extended its membership to the new private business elite. This module will examine the apparent paradoxes of politics today in the People's Republic of China by looking at (a) the changing foundations of CCP legitimacy and political support, and (b) the political and social consequences of China's adoption of a "socialist market economy". Topics include: political history of China, institutions in a one party-state, the politics of economic reform, nationalisms, Globalisation, civil society and resistance, ethnic relations, democratisation, and foreign policy. The course will give students a strong foundational knowledge to understand the institutional mechanisms and policies which govern China. It will also introduce students to popular debates within China on the social and cultural impact of China's economic transformation.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ acquire a firm grasp of the foundations of the Chinese political system.

■ critically assess the political and social consequences of China's "socialist market economy".

■ draw on academic research on contemporary Chinese politics.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.