Global Inequality and International Development POLITIC4122

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

In September 2000, world leaders in New York adopted the Millennium Declaration, which embodied eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and about 20 specific targets. Following a decade in which the 'development project' seemed to have lost fashion, the international community decided to face up the widening gap between the rich and the poor. This led to a renewed focus by most donors on foreign aid and in fact the amount of development assistance increased enormously, more than doubling between 2000 and 2007. But to achieve the MDGs, it eventually became clear that foreign aid was not enough, but better synergies between aid and non-aid policies needed to be explored. This course focuses on the relations between the North and the South and looks at how issues of trade, agriculture, migration, investment in environment can reduce global inequalities and promote international development.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Assessment

Assessment

Summative: final mark is composed of two components:

■ A final essay of 3,000 to 3,500 words (75% of final mark). For specific submission dates please refer to the Honours Course Guide.

■ The better two of three quizzes taken in class during the course (25% of final mark). If a student is absent for one of the quizzes, the remaining two quizzes will count. If a student misses two quizzes, the remaining quiz will count, provided that the student has been granted good cause. If a student misses three quizzes, the final essay will count for the entirety of the summative assessment, provided that the student has been granted good cause.

Main Assessment In: April/May

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

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Course Aims

In September 2000, world leaders in New York adopted the Millennium Declaration, which embodied eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and about 20 specific targets. Following a decade in which the 'development project' seemed to have lost fashion, the international community decided to face up the widening gap between the rich and the poor. This led to a renewed focus by most donors on foreign aid and in fact the amount of development assistance increased enormously, more than doubling between 2000 and 2007. But to achieve the MDGs, it eventually became clear that foreign aid was not enough, but better synergies between aid and non-aid policies needed to be explored. This course focuses on the relations between the North and the South and looks at how issues of trade, agriculture, migration, investment in environment can reduce global inequalities and promote international development.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this programme students will be able to:

■ demonstrate a clear grasp of contemporary debates on the politics of international development in a broader theoretical and historical perspective;

■ assess why and how international donors allocate and deliver foreign aid;

■ evaluate the impact of non-aid policies on the economic and social development of developing countries;

■ assess the role of international institutions (such as the UNDP, IMF, and World Bank) and key international states in promoting international development

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.