Latin American Politics POLITIC4013

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The process of political and economic change in Latin America has been complex - involving a changing cast of actors and an evolving spectrum of motivating ideas. This module will introduce students to some of the debates around politics in the Latin American context.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Assessment

An essay of 2,000-2,500 words (40%), an unseen two-hour exam in which students must tackle two questions out of six (50%), and class participation (10%) based on attendance and contribution to the class discussions.

 

Adjustments and/or alternative modes of assessment will be available for students with disabilities which hinder attendance or prevent public speaking.

Main Assessment In: December

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

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Course Aims

The process of political and economic change in Latin America has been complex - involving a changing cast of actors and an evolving spectrum of motivating ideas. This module will introduce students to some of the debates around politics in the Latin American context. It will examine the changing relationship between the state, civil society and citizens since 1980. The course will cover various aspects of the democratisation process in the region. In the first two weeks it will consider the concepts at the centre of the debates. This followed by an examination of the 'transition to democracy' and subsequently by discussions of the different elements which have played a key role in shaping contemporary politics in Latin America. Finally, it will address some of the challenges confronting Latin American states today.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this programme students will be able to:

  be able to show an understanding of theoretical ideas drawn from the field of comparative politics, as applied to Latin America.

  develop an appreciation for the economic and social issues that remain sources of division in Latin America after transitions.

  read and synthesise material from a range of academic sources

  discuss cogently with the class and synthesise discussions in presentations

  present arguments in writing using a number of sources that are correctly referenced

  debate articulately the various models of democracy and their usefulness in explaining Latin American politics

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.