Just War In The 21St Century POLITIC4011

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

This module will explore the role of war in international society, and the moral and legal issues it raises. To this end, students will be introduced to the primary traditions of thought regarding the right to war in world politics, namely pacifism, realism, and the just war tradition.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Two essay of 2,000 to 2,500 words. Each essay will count for 50% of the final grade.

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable

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Course Aims

This module will explore the role of war in international society, and the moral and legal issues it raises. To this end, students will be introduced to the primary traditions of thought regarding the right to war in world politics, namely pacifism, realism, and the just war tradition with emphasis placed upon the historical and religious roots of these traditions. The second half of this module will focus exclusively on the just war tradition, allowing students the opportunity to apply its principles and categories to contemporary issues in international politics. Among these will be jus ad bellum controversies relating to the justified recourse to war (terrorism and anticipatory war), and jus in bello dilemmas pertaining to proper conduct in war (torture, war crimes, and supreme emergencies). Extensive use will be made of case-studies, with a pronounced emphasis on material drawn from the War on Terror. This module will encourage students to question whether traditional conventions and practices regarding the right to war are relevant to the twenty-first century, or do they require revision.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this programme students will be able to:

■ obtain a thorough understanding of the different theoretical approaches employed to question the ethics of war;

■ engage with and analyse the major traditions of thought pertaining to justice and warfare, i.e., realism, pacifism, and just war;

■ list, define, and problematize the central principles associated with the just war tradition;

■ apply and interrogate these just war principles to historical and contemporary cases;

■ discuss the continuing utility (or lack thereof) of the just war tradition in the context of the War on Terror.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.