Please note: there may be some adjustments to the teaching arrangements published in the course catalogue for 2020-21. Given current circumstances related to the Covid-19 pandemic it is anticipated that some usual arrangements for teaching on campus will be modified to ensure the safety and wellbeing of students and staff on campus; further adjustments may also be necessary, or beneficial, during the course of the academic year as national requirements relating to management of the pandemic are revised.

Global Environmental Politics POLITIC4007

  • Academic Session: 2020-21
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 4 (SCQF level 10)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

In this course students will study how states and non-governmental actors seek to cooperate to address transboundary environmental problems. We begin by identifying the theoretical foundations of international cooperation and governance as well as the role that institutions, and non-state actors play in these political processes. Students will use this analytical toolkit to evaluate why some environmental problems can be governed effectively, while others cannot.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Mandatory Entry Requirements

Entry to Honours Politics requires a grade point average of 12 (Grade C) over Politics 2A and Politics 2B as a first attempt.

Excluded Courses

None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

■ Policy briefing 1500 words (30%)

■ Essay 3000 words (60%)

■ Seminar participation, including engagement in an in-class debate or role playing exercise (10%). Where applicable (e.g. power point presentations), written material will also be submitted. Adjustments and/or alternative modes of assessment will be available for students with disabilities that hinder attendance and/or public speaking.

Are reassessment opportunities available for all summative assessments? Not applicable for Honours courses

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Course Aims

Over the last several decades, international environmental problems, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, and the depletion of natural resources have gained increasing attention from policymakers, academics, and occasional observers alike. Common to all these problems is that they require global solutions, but how do global environmental politics work?

 

In this course students will study how states and non-governmental actors seek to cooperate to address transboundary environmental problems. We begin by identifying the theoretical foundations of international cooperation and governance as well as the role that institutions, and non-state actors play in these political processes. Students will use this analytical toolkit to evaluate why some environmental problems can be governed effectively, while others cannot.. Topics discussed in class include questions like: Why are climate politics so difficult? Do democracies have better environmental policies? Can international environmental agreements be effective? What role do firms and global markets play in environmental cooperation? All these topics are rooted in the most recent literature and, where applicable, linked to current policy debates.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course students should be able to:

 

■ demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the major theories of global environmental politics;

■ apply relevant concepts and theories to analyse the interaction between the political, economic, and institutional aspects of global environmental politics;

■ interpret a range of quantitative and qualitative research findings regarding pressing global environmental problems, such as climate change and a renewable energy transformation;

■ critically assess the different goals of global environmental policy and governance, and identify the key trade-offs involved in environmental policy-making;

■ evaluate the political and economic implications of adopting different environmental policy options;

■ advance reasoned and evidence-based arguments, both orally and in writing.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.