Feminist Perspectives on Politics POLITIC3023

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 3 (SCQF level 9)
  • Typically Offered: Either Semester 1 or Semester 2
  • Available to Visiting Students: No
  • Available to Erasmus Students: No

Short Description

This course seeks to introduce students to a variety of feminist perspectives on politics. The course examines key questions within the study of politics at both the local and the global level and within and beyond state boundaries to reveal how feminist perspectives have transformed understandings of the 'political'.

Timetable

This course may not be running this year. For further information please check the Politics Moodle page or contact the subject directly.

Requirements of Entry

Grade D3 in Politics 2A and Politics 2B

Excluded Courses

Feminist Perspectives on Politics - POLITIC4104)

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

The summative assessment for the course is based on a Critical Review (40%) and Essay (60%) 2,500-3,000 words.

Course Aims

This course seeks to introduce students to a variety of feminist perspectives on politics. The course examines key questions within the study of politics at both the local and the global level and within and beyond state boundaries to reveal how feminist perspectives have transformed understandings of the 'political'. In particular, the course explores the ways in which feminist analyses have revealed and challenged key assumptions about the 'who, when, where and how' of politics resulting from 'masculinist' constructions of state-society relations, international relations and human rights. Students will then apply feminist analyses to a series of contemporary questions in international politics with a particular focus on issues relating to women's human rights.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of this course students will be able to:

■ Understand feminist thought and practice as part of a range of political phenomena, enabling non-honours students to build upon and develop knowledge and skills acquired at pre-honours.

■ Understand a variety of feminist perspectives and the differences between them;

■ Explain the contribution that feminist perspectives have made to our understandings of the political;

■ Apply feminist analyses to contemporary empirical questions;

■ Understand the development of the politics of women's human rights

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Students must submit at least 75% by weight of the components (including examinations) of the course's summative assessment.