Politics 1A: Introduction to Politics POLITIC1001

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Social and Political Sciences
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 1 (SCQF level 7)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes
  • Available to Erasmus Students: Yes

Short Description

The course will introduce students to politics by focusing on institutional structures in the United Kingdom, with a look at concepts and issues that will include elections, political parties and organised interests. A multilevel governance approach will examine politics across Scotland and the UK, as well as explore Britain's global role in international organisations. 

Timetable

Lectures: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 1-2pm.
Tutorials:
As required

Requirements of Entry

None

Excluded Courses


None

Co-requisites

None

Assessment

Final Examination (60%)
Class Essay (3
0%)
Tutorial Performance (10%)

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of politics by exploring basic political concepts and themes in a British context. In the process of exploring these basic concepts and themes, students will be exposed to the core components of British and Scottish politics, including political institutions and organisations - plus various forms of political participation. Students will also learn about the international organisations the UK is associated with, facilitating a better understanding of Britain's global role and the links between domestic and international politics.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

Course-specific ILOs:
Students should work to attain the following abilities before undergoing summative assessment:

(a) to identify the key institutional
components of a liberal-democratic political systems, and to distinguish the primary from the secondary functions of political institutions;
(b) to isolate, and to compare, the effects individuals have on political institutions, and the effects that instit
utions have on individuals;
(c) to distinguish empirical and normative political arguments;

(d) to analyse political concepts and theories;

(e) to apply those political concepts and theories to 'real world' examples and case studies;

(f) to interpret quant
itative evidence.

Minimum Requirement for Award of Credits

Submission of the course essay and completion of the examination. Achievement of a minimum of Grade G.