Roman Drama In Performance LATIN5014

  • Academic Session: 2019-20
  • School: School of Humanities
  • Credits: 20
  • Level: Level 5 (SCQF level 11)
  • Typically Offered: Semester 1
  • Available to Visiting Students: Yes

Short Description

The aims of the course are

to analyse from the point of view of staging selected plays of Plautus, Terence, Seneca, and any fragmentary Roman playwrights that are available in English translation and have a substantial corpus;

to consider the function of stage-movements, props, exits and entrances, comic business, and dress-codes as theatrical devices that contribute to character-portrayal and advance the plot;

to draw some conclusions about the ways in which each of the abovementioned playwrights constructs his plays and conveys messages to his audience.

Timetable

This is a PG (T) course, taught over one semester. Teaching will be by weekly seminar if enrolment is five or more, or by weekly supervision and guided reading if enrolment is less than five

Requirements of Entry

Available to students who have Latin to Honours level or equivalent, or at the discretion of the MLitt (T) convener

Excluded Courses

Roman Drama in Performance JWFS

Assessment

Two essays (20% each)

Project (60%)

Main Assessment In: December

Course Aims

The aims of the course are

to analyse from the point of view of staging selected plays of Plautus, Terence, Seneca, and any fragmentary Roman playwrights that are available in English translation and have a substantial corpus;

to consider the function of stage-movements, props, exits and entrances, comic business, and dress-codes as theatrical devices that contribute to character-portrayal and advance the plot;

to draw some conclusions about the ways in which each of the abovementioned playwrights constructs his plays and conveys messages to his audience.

Intended Learning Outcomes of Course

By the end of the course students should be able to

- develop, orally and in writing, a well-constructed and coherent argument about the ways in which specific Plautine and Terentian comedies and Senecan tragedies operate as theatrical spectacles;

- demonstrate, orally and in writing, that they have critically read all primary and secondary sources required, that they have mastered the system of making references, and that they have conducted independent and original research engaging personally with their subject